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Full text of "Kansas State collegian"

/^K A N S A S STATE 

Collegian 



INSI 

Stuck 

lumii 

to disaM. . u » 



Sub Exp Daw 
Kansas Slate Historic* Society 
Newspaper Section 
PO Bon 3585 
Topeka KS 66601 




www. ksUlccolleg lan com 



Friday, April 29,2005 



Vol 109, No. 153 



Panel 
to discuss 
diversity 
in media 



By LMnn Sukzan 
KANSAS SUTt COUKMN 

Diversity in the media will be ad- 
dressed by a panel today in the 
K-State Student Union. 

The panel will include both cam- 
pus and professional media leaden 

Keener Tippin It, research news 
and features coordinator for K-State 
Media Relations and Marketing, 
said he will share his ideas on the 
importance of diversity 

"I just want to i hare some of my 
experiences as far as being a person 
of color in the media," he said 

Tom Grimes, associate professor 
of journalism, said he wants to show 
the importance of diversity 

"Diversity is a tool to accomplish 
journalistic and sociologk ends," 
Grimes said. "You don't have to be 
a liberal You don't have to love 
everyone, you can do this for the 
sake of doing the job property" 

Along with Grimes and Tippin, 
several other people will be on the 
media diversity panel including Fred 
Brock, assistant professor of journal- 
ism and former reporter for The 
New York Times; Andrew Latham, 
program director of KSDB-FM 
919; Umut Newbury, associate edi- 
tor of Mother Earth News Maga- 
zine; Chris Olsen, reporter for 
KSNT-TV and producer of Purple 
Power Hour; Sarah Rice, editor in 
chief of the Collegian; and Erin Slat- 
tery, chair of Student Publications 
Inc., Board of Directors 



Tuition 

waiver plan 

discussed 



By Wendy nsun 

KANWSSWECOUfWI 

The tuition -waiver plan dis- 
cussed at the Kansas Board of Re- 
gents' meeting last week is being 
drafted by administration 

The plan, 
would give a par- 
tial tuition waiver 
to spouses and 
dependents of 
KState faculty 
members, ft will 
be discussed by 
Faculty Senate 
before being pro- 
posed, and then 
must be pasted 
through the Fiscal 
Affairs and Audit 
Committee 

Jackie Snears, 
Senate president, has done research 
on other universities that have im- 
plemented a tuition -waivers plan. 

"Our perception is that limited 
tuition waivers is important to facul- 
ty retention, especially at the associ- 
ate professor level" Spears said. "We 
are hoping that a limited-tuition 
program will help associate profes 
sore remain at K-State." 

Snears said most institutions in 
the Big 12 have executed a tuition- 
waiver plan at their schools. 

"For the most part, we hire 



Did you know? 

Faculty 

salaries 

■ K-State faculty 

Avenge salary, 
WISH 

■ RqUsthoors' 
faculty Average 
salary $70,893 

Sourer: 



SMTUmOHPSKlO 



Sebelius advances prescription drug program 



By Maths* Bator 

KANSAS STAItCOUMIAN 

Governor Kathleen Sebelius instituted 
a program that will give Kansas residents 
access to cheaper medications. 

Illinois governor, Rod Blagojevich, de- 
veloped the I SaveRx program, which is 
designed to give American citizens access 
to discounted medications produced in 
Canada, Great Britain and Ireland 

The program went into effect due to 
the rising costs of health care and pre- 
scription medications Blagojevich Lnsti 
tuted the program in Illinois on Oct. 4 



and officials in Wisconsin and Missouri 
adopted it as well Blagojevich said the 
program is already helping more than 
30,000 people in all three states 

In a news release after Sebelius' meet- 
ing with the Illinois governor, Blagojevich 
stressed the importance of the program 

"life-saving medicines should not be 
luxury products available only to people 
who can afford them," Blagojevich said. 
"Through I-SaveRx, seniors and others 
with high prescription drug costs can 
now afford the medicine they need." 

Considering Kansans in similar situa- 
tions, Sebelius instituted the program on 



Nov. 30 to help offset medical expenses. 
The program is now available to all 2.7 
million Kansas residents 

I -SaveRx gives all participants access 
to over 100 prescriptions for chronic ill- 
nesses with savings of 25 to 50 percent 

The medications must meet state reg- 
ulations in order to participate. 

All pharmacies within the 1 -SaveRx 
network have agreed to process and dis- 
pense medications according to Illinois 
pharmaceutical guidelines 

Despite the opportunities this pro- 
gram offers, both medically and financial 
ly, there are other considerations. 



The generic pricing of drugs within the 
United States may cost less than drugs of- 
fered through this program In some in- 
stances, insurance may cover most of the 
medications at minimal co-pay costs. 

Participating in the program may also 
pose legal and health risks 

Kansas Attorney General Phi 11 Kline 
said that while this program works with- 
in legal limits, it's dangerously close to vi- 
olating federal guidelines 

The FDA and the government have 
adamantly tried to restrict importation of 

SceMUGSraotlO 









Why we Wabash 

* Wabash CannonbalF began with 14 band members, song about hobos 



By Krlstsn Roderick 

KANSAS STAT! COUiGIAN 

Sometimes legends happen by 
chance. 

When disaster struck in Nichols 
hall, a legend was bom at K-State 

There arc many stories on how 
the "Wabash Cannonball" came to 
life, but they all point to one truth. 

On Dec. 13, 1968, arsonists set 



fire to Nichols Hall, destroying 
much of the music department, in- 
cluding the band's instruments and 
most of the music. Phil Hewett, the 
band director at that time, had to 
take action to find instruments and 
music for the Dec. 16 basketball 
game against Syracuse University 

He found instruments at area 
schools and brought the only piece 
of music he had in his briefcase - 



the "Wabash Cannonball." 

"For some reason, Phil Hewett 
took the music home that night," 
Frank Tracz, band director, said 

Hewett. who served as band di- 
rector from 1968-82, died in 2002 
He told the Tope ka Capital- Journal 
in 1998 that he had planned to wait 
two years before actually perform- 
ing the "Wabash Cannonball" He 
had merely taken it home to make a 



few revisions. 

With 14 band members, a set of 
borrowed instruments and a song 
about railroad hobos, the band 
started a tradition that spread 
across K-State athletics 

"1 think it caught on because it's 
fun to listen to," Tracz said. "It's 
taken on a new light" 

Anthony Walenz, sophomore in 

Set WABASH Pagt 10 



Pop singer Ben Kweller highlights Springfest events tonight 



By Sarah Rke 

KANSAS STATE COt I fGWN 

An inflatable slide, local music, tree 
massages and funnel cakes will pro- 
vide stress relief for overworked stu- 
dents Friday. 

Springfest, sponsored by Union 
Program Council, will also feature 
local bands including The Spins, The 
Mathematics, Surphace and Ruska- 
bank. But the highlight of the evening 
will be a 9:30 p.m. performance by 
nationally- recognized pop singer 



Ben Kweller. 

Kweller, a singer, songwriter and 
guitarist, appeared on the OC in No- 
vember and composed a song for 
Moveon.org as well as playing for a 
John Kerry rally during election sea- 
son. Kweller s most recent album, "On 
My Way," was released in April 2004 

The event has been organized in 
the past, but has never been as big as 
this year's events, Beth Bailey, UPC as- 
sistant director, said. 

"It's just an end-o (the year 
blowout." she said. 



Bailey said she expects a minimum 
of 800 students at the event, which 
cost the program more than $26,000. 
A rain plan will move the concerts to 
Forum Hall from the Bosco Plaza 

Andrea Bryant, adviser to Wildcat 
Forever, the student Alumni Assoc ia 
tion, said she hopes the group gets ex- 
posure by sponsoring the event as well 
as helping students relax 

"It's an event that's flexible and will 
go on late afternoon and evening," she 
said "Take a break even if you can't 
take the whole everting off" 



Springfest events 



4:30 pm The Spins 
5:40 p m The mathematics 
6:50 p.m Surphace 
7:50 pm. Ruskabant 

9:30 pm Ben Kweller 



4:30 p.m The IlgSlkk, 

inflatable 

4:10-9 p. m. fret theraptrtk 

ttsftSfAtJtH 



5 p m Sand art (while 

supplies last) 

5-11 p,m Airbrush tattos 

5 p m. Funnel cakes, first 

250 are free, remaining ttt 

54. 

1 1 p.m Free wrtitsor 

movie, "National Treasure* 

9.30 p.m midnight Rod ft 

I*w1 hi Recreation Area 



Today 



£ 



High 48 
Low 14 



Saturday 



High 63 
Low 41 



NEWS HIGHLIGHTS 



Iraq's cabinet approved 

Iratrs National Assembly on Thursday 
ac^ravedtrtftoumiyi first rJemocra 
tkally elected gwernment, a 91***- 
dommated body that mchsJrs the 
Sumi minority from positions and 
could hamper efforts to dampen the 
Insurgency Two of the tout deputy 
prime minister's slots were vacant 






Social Security changes 

President Bush urged Congress lo 
erafl con tt m ioiis Social Security and 
eneigy legislation and confirm Ms 
cotpjwtfslil court nominees 
Thursday Tin not surprised that 
some are bawng at doing haul 
wonV Bush said oft!* Republican 
uMrtJoHtd Congress. 



Sebelius' veto safe 

nous* memoers wno oppose 
abortion failed Thursday to override 

£~, If ^kl. ., * -*.-*>. .-i -j _ kill 

uov. uuaeea seoemiJ wto ot a m 
imposing additional regulations on 
abortion dimes. The vote was two 
votes short of the minimum needed 
to send the Ml to the Senate. 



DON'T FORGET 



The president and CEO of 


ntssamrairtz and 


th^MMffftM litstftiitc 


Miioeasteni are Deaw 


ffOrtlrWahinlk 


plays at 8 tonight In 


AoBtrtMtiis 


Mchok Theater Tickets for 


presenting a lecture at 


students are $7. 


1030 am today In the K 




Slate Student Union 


AkAsklsVarykmnK 


forum Hall 


tfcMtda* is from 2:30 




to 3:15 pun. today m Hal* 




m. 




) 



» W" * 1 



Page 2 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Friday, April 29, 2005 



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BEST BETS 

Your guide to this weekend's entertainment 



1 1 PURPLE PRIDE 

The K-State football spring game will 
start at 1:10 p.m. Saturday at KSU 
Stadium. This will be the first dunce 
the puWk has to set the 2005 football 
team In action 

Also, the K State baseball team 
will play the University of Kansas at 
6:30 tonight at Toimon Family Field. 
Then the Cats will travel to Lawrence 
(o play KU at 7 p.m. Saturday and 2 
p.m. Sunday ai Hoglund Ballpark 
Lawrence is only 84 miles away, which 
makes for a good raadtrtp, so go cheer 
on the Cats. 



'«> 



The blotter 

Arrests in Riley County 



•» >. 



■ 



j&ikffi** 



2 1 WALK OR JOG THE DOG 




The 2Q0S MS Walk in Manhattan will begin at TO 
a.m. Saturday. Registration for the Walk will begin 
at 9 am at 3rd and PoynQ. The event Includes 
three and six mile routes. You can register at 
www.msm/rAtmenfo.orji or call (800) 745-7148. 

Bring your dog and register to jog at the 10th 
annual Dog-N Jog at 8 am Saturday at the 
K State Veterinary Hospital, located at 1800 
Denison Ave. There will be a 1 0K and a 5K race, 
both that begin at 9. At 10:30 there will be a Fun 
Run race Proceeds go to the 2006 Class of 
Veterinary Medicine students 



3 1 THAT'S A BUNCH OF... 



The musical is about the Little Sisters of Hobo ken who are trying to raise 
money so they can bury sisters were accidentally poisoned by the 
convent cook Sister Julia (Child of God). The show has been a hit, winning 
Poor awards including Best off -Broadway Musical. 

"Nunseme" will be performed next week at 8 p.m Thursday, f riday 
and Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday. Tickets are $10 for students, $6 for 
children under 12, $14 for adults and $S for student walk-ins Thursdays 
and Sundays. Tickets are available at the Center located at 1 520 Poyntz. 
For more information call 537-4420. 



4 1 MUSIC GALORE 




This weekend is another big weekend in musk. 

Springfest Is tonight in Forum Hall. Various 
activrties such as a slide, sand art, airbrush 
tattoos, massages and funnel cakes will be avail 
able. The concert for Springfest starts at 4:30 and 
includes the Spins, the Mathematics, Surphace, 
Ruskabank and nationally known 
singer/songwriter Ben Kweller 

Also, Sunset Revival, featuring Pomeroy, the 
UNIT, Emma's Mine, Mlkey Needleman, 
Addicted Behavior and Kipper's Cradle The concert 
begins at noon Saturday on the Sigma Nu front 
lawn, located at ST 3 Sunset Ave (over is $10 at 
the door for the all day event for all ages. 



5 1 GET REAL 



The openkv) rKeptton for the latest Sij^iier Plebori Art Gallery eilMbrt will 
be tonight at 5 to 8 run. featured artists a» Aaim fttrwri, wr« ensiles 
contemporary realism paintings and Mart Berahaus, who creates metaphys 
kal sculptures Special guest artist is Jaquetyn Hughes Mooney has a series 
of art guilts on display as well. Art from other artists will be on display, too. 
Gallery hours are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m Monday through Saturday 



Reports are taken directly 
from Riley County Polke 
Department's daily logs. 

Wednesday. April 27 

■ At 10:20 am, Keriann 
Layman, 701 Allison Ave., was 
arrested for driving on a 
suspended license Bond was set 
at $750. 

■ At 1:05 p.m., Angela Parker, 
Topeka, was attested for driving 
on a suspended license. Bond 
was set at $500 

■ At 4:53 pm, Clifton Napier, 
Paxko, Kan., was arrested for 
theft and forgery. Bond was set 
at $5,000. 

■ At 5:50 p.m , Jamie Gibson, 
Alma, Kan , was arrested for 
aggravated burglary and proba- 
tion violation. Bond was set at 
$90,000. 

■ Al 6:40 p.m ., Sequoya Stokes, 



1700 M. Manhattan, No. 309, 5 
was arrested for battery. Bond 
was set at 5500. 

■ At 9 pm, Sylvia Chase, 3813 
Kates Court, was arrested for 
battery Bond was set at $500 

■ At 9:30 pm, Ray Chase, 38T3 
Kates Court, was arrested for 
battery. Bond was set at $500. 

■ At 11:03 pm, Kimberty 
Hodges, 3000 Turtle Creek Blvd., 
No. 546, was arrested for driving 
on a suspended Ikense and OUT 
Bond was set at $1,000. 

Thursday, April 28 

■ At 2:45 am., Jason Hicks, 525 
N Manhattan Ave., No. 1, was 
arrested for DUI. Bond was set at 
$750. 

■ At3:50a.m.,MandyHabtg, 
730 Allen Road, lot 41, was 
arrested for DUI Bond was set at 
$750 



The planner 

Campus bulletin board 



Campus Calendar is the 
Coilegians carnpus bulletin 
board service, To place an item 
in the Campus Calendar, stop 

byKed/iel16andfiHouta 
form or e-mail the news editor 
at f>u//etinsii*spu6,tou,e<ru by 
1 1 a.m. two days before ft It to 
run. 

■ The Graduate School 
announces the final oral defense 
of the doctoral dissertation of 
MyongJaeLeeatlOamtoday 
in Justin ISO. 

■ The Graduate School 
announces the final oral defense 
of the doctoral dissertation of 
Karen Gasket) is at 1 p.m. today 
In Chemistry/Biochemistry 
building room 437. 

■ The Graduate School 
announces the final oral defense 



of the doctoral dissertation of 
Daniel Asunskls at 3:30 p m 
today in Willard 101. 

■ KSU American Fisheries 
Society ts hosting its annual 
fishing tournament is from 
sunrise to 3 p.m on Saturday at 
Miffonl State Lake There is a $5 
entry fee, and contestants must 
contact ik447?&k-aate.edu by 
noon today or sign up in 
Bushnell 212. 

■ The Rotaract dub is helping 
with the school carnival at 
Woodrow Wilson Elementary 
School from 10:45 am to 2 p.m 
on Saturday. 

■ Delta Upsiton and Alpha Delta 
Pi an? hosting a Dry After Hours, 
all you can eat Pancake Feed for 
$3 from midnight to 3:30 a.m. 
Saturday 



Corrections and clarifications 

Corrections and dattfkations appear in this space If you see 
something that should be corrected, call News Editor Krist i Huria at 
532-6556 or e mail atk0an9spubJ(5U.tiiu 



Kansas State Collegian 

(USPS 291 020) The Kansas Stale Collegian, a student newspaper al 
Kansas State university, ts published by Student Publications Inc. , 
Kediie 103, Manhattan. KS 66506 The Collegian is published 
weekdays during the school year and on Wednesdays during the 
summer Periodkai postage is paid at Manhattan, KS 66502 
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Kansas State Collegian, orcu 
latton desk, Kediie 103, Manhattan, KS 66506-7167 

O Kansas State Collegian, 2005 




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Friday, April 29, 2005 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Kige i 



Pi Beta Phi wins dance-off 




Jotlyn8rown|C0tiWN 

Stephanie Harwell, freshman in education and mathematics, dancM with Sigma Chi coach, Jaied Rolding, freshman In nutritlip ..id 
emciw, during pi Beta Phil 80s mil. PI Ma Phi's dam* placed first during the Derby Days com petition. 



fay Kristi Hurt* 

KANW STATE COUlGIAN 

Roll call was answered by 
loud cheering 

Veils of enthusiasm came 
from the crowd for the hope 
their team would win 

The Derby Days event spun 
sored by Sigma Chi fraternity to 
benefit the Children's Miracle 
Network was at the Wareham 
Opera House Thursday night Pi 
Beta Phi sorority won the com- 
petition, Delta Delta Delta took 
second and Chi Omega look 
third 

For a $2 donation, people 
could watch six sororities dance 
off in an annual competition 

Its the must anticipated 
event of the year" Ashley 
Payson, sophomore in advertis- 
ing and Delta Delta Delta si >n >r 
ity member, said 

SEach Mater, freshman in 
computer engineerinj: and p^v 
cltology and Sigma Chi member. 
1. 1 ill ce ted donations at the door 
Matet said that although it is his 



78% OF OUR READERS 



first year working with Derby 
Days, he has heard thai the 
dance competition is the best 

"People are so cxl ited This is 
an awesome event, we can all 
have fun and still benefit the 
Children's Miracle Network," 
Mater said. 

Maier said that the national 
philanthropy for Sigma Chi is 
the Children's Miracle Network 
and that all of their events prof 
its go to il 

Whitney Clark, senior in so- 
cial work and Kappa Delta 
sorority member, said that her 
sorority has been participating in 
the dance competition (or two 
years, hut she has gone to all 
four years that she ha> bean at K- 
State. 

"II gives us all a feeling of 
spirit and unity," Clark said 

Kappa Delta dressed in 
themes for each nighl of Derby 
Days and plana to continue into 
Friday and Saturdays events 
dark said 

Avery Chamblin, freshman in 
psychology and Kappa Delta 



Fast facts 

Winners of the dance 

competition 

■ 1st Pi Beta Phi 

■ 2nd: Delta Delta Delta 

■ 3rd Chi Omega 



member, said that she has really 
enjoyed her first experience with 
Derby Days 

"This has been like the best 
week ever [his is even better 
than homecoming," Chamblin 
■aid 

Allison Voris, freshman in 
mass communications and 
Kappa Delta member, said she 
agreed 

"Hie Sigma (.'his are our 
homecoming partners this year, 
and this is a great opportunity to 
get to know them," Voris said 

The Derby Days event ends 
on Saturday with field events 
Maier said 

"It'll be a great ending to a re- 
ally exciting week" he said 



Cabinet appointed 



By Joanna Rubkk 

KWStt VlWICaiJGIAK 

Student Senate made its final 
approvals and commendation 
Thursday in a one-hour meeting 

Student Senate Chair Tjnon 
Moore appointed the new com 
mitlee chairs, senate secretary 
and parliamentarian Senate ap- 
proved the appointees. 

Student Body President 
Michael Burns selected his cabi- 
net, which senate approved 

After appointments, there was 
one item of business to commend 
Phil Anderson, director of the K 
Stale Honor System. Anderson is 
stepping down as the director this 
spring. He also taught public 
speaking courses and served as 
faculty senate representative. 

Anderson developed the nnj 
tern after 87 students were caught 
cheating in 1994, Bums said 

"Now, we have one nl the na- 
tions best honors' systems," he 
said 

K-State's Honor System cur- 
rently is recognized as one of the 
top eight university honor 
terns by the Center for Acadatnk 
Integrity. 

News update 
Student Senate 
appointments 

■ Academic Affairs and University 
Relation', Committee Chair: Narole Boan 

■ Allocations Committee Chair: Dave Hart 

■ College Council Allocations Committee 
Chair: Anthony Carter 

■ Governmental Relations Committee 
Chair Matt King 

■ Privilege Fee Committee Chair: Matt 
Wagner 

■ Senate Operations Committee Chair 
Brandon Sager 

■ Student Affairs and Social Services 
Committee Chair Jim Mosimartn 

■ Senate secretary Sarah Sexton 

■ Senate parliamentarian: Emily 
Schmetdler 



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1 00 6<»jUo',i j nd I It i 

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Faith Evangelical Free Church 

• Worship al 8:00,10 .30, 

10:40, 12:00 

• Sunday School at 9:15 
•College Class at 10:30 


192 1 Barnn Rd 

776-2066 




\ 



Lutheran Church 

vVbrxhip Sundays 
9:30 and 11:00 

Scimlc 5:00 p.m. 

Pasted Michael Ide 
BOO Kimball 
539-7371 
■ . v\ peace- it 

in t hi ist . . .Gather . . . 
r«iM jiiid (io Forth! 



First Lutheran 

,10th & Poyntz 537-8532 

Worship 

Sat 5:30 p.m.. Sun 10 a.m. 

Sunday School all ages 9:45 a.m. 



Come Worship 
With Us 

1$t Church of the N*zaren* 

kirnMI 

: 9:30 



-10:40 S" 
7-00 W. 






■iuniti*s 

w*-asi 




Episcopal 



[ )H H rw III K.1I1S. JS 

Campus Ministry 



Sunday wodtiii' ll 
9 PauTl EpHcofMl i inmii 
Vxtfl B Pi lynu Mai i 



Rugged Cross Bapt 



7D4 r. UirlMi 

Sunday School 10 am 
nam 



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WESTVIEW 

COMMUNITY 
CHURCI I 

Services at 9 & 10:45 a.m. 
and 6:30 pm. UNBOUND 

SbdanlM 



I Pmtof Allen Todd 



k. 



Wntui rj-wim Pol Bennell 
OO I Ft. Riley Ulvd 

537 7173 




titilor Ml ATI I 



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WowsHir Sic 
'i sr 10:45 AM 



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Lutheran 

Campus 

Ministry 



1 IV SupfXT. f> p.lll 

,u I iittvi Hi him- I ?45 AmiTMio 
Swot) Evening Wronhip 

7 p.m.. |).lll|i>Tll| 1 ll,l|vl 

» » ii.ksii.i-clii/lc'in-i'lin 
Dr. I'aiiy Brnwn-Harnrtt 

liiti-rtm I ttmpti\ Fmtt'f 

$39*4431 

Open In All 



Unitarian- /"T\ 
Universalistf **"M 
Fellowship i 
of Manhattan 



6- 



■il Ik 177 
P>t*gf*in Simig ji III.-I.Sj hi i . 

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First United 
Methodist Church 



■lMftja.ll IMWu.m. 
Itmditntmii Win thip m 

HiitM 

M:45 tl-iii. 

■ V< Mm 

in (Ai ■ atrr 

•M5a.ni. 

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fill f't'itti: * ??t>-lQ(?t • turn* ttuiitutihiti nnn 




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St. I llkts 

Lutheran 
Church 

IM ^uiiM't \uiwv 

Salurdav 

triiditit'ii.il Wol ship ii:iHI |i.m, 

Sunday - 

I rii.hiniii.il W.ii,liip 8: 10 i.m. 

( oltcfe Hii'ii Stud) " : -t <1 1 ■ 

C niilwi|H>Mt\ VSt»i\lii|> 1 1 :IM) 11.111. 
i iiniMi- P»*ror - Krk Wnod 

1 mail: tjni|iuinni a flint hill v , 

(71(5) S.W-2MI4 




yracc 
^Baptist 

Church 



5"«H [Jitkt'm 1 hlk, B. of SelhCTiild 

♦ Sunday ♦ 
£ Morning Worship 
8:15 & 10:45 aan. 

Bjbk-i I Ml Ages 4. JO a.m. 

fjemug Servitf (f Care t'elk ^ p.m. 

776-0424 



St. Isidore's 

Catholic Student 

Center 

fe MASS SCHEDULE 
Aiesday Thursday 10:00 p.m. 
Friday 12: 10 p. m, 
Saturday S p.m 
^Sunday 9:30 a.m., 11 am 

Sun. 4:30 p.m., 6 p.m. 
•-Father Keith Wetwr, Chaplain 

J11 Deoison 539-7496 



Blue Valley Memorial 
United Methodist Church 



Ihe LMa 




ilh ,. Big hmM 
■«, Pastot 

RV«. 
M 

Caaua|WonMp-S:30 

I ff all af m - 9:13 

Worship . 10:30 



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BelM Afrit an Methodist 
Episcopal Church 

i^tji>i.ii^i . 

W\ IWlM Strwl 
(I HI Nt i.i .. Miinw) 

Kcvrrtiiit Pennj' PiklilmJ 
Pailoi 

%lmi ■ \M 

KibUm MUD im 

HAM 



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First Baptist Church 

(entered in Christ" 
2121 Blue Hills Road 

539-86^1 

www.llinthills.ciim/~lrK'iiihk 

U:00 Worship 

9:45 Sunday School 
Colicgi- Clan .'U.iit.iiik' 

Study at Campus Center 

\ ind tan, IMendi felkvwmhif nd man m 

Baptist Campus Center 

1801 Anderwrv Ave. 539-3051 



First Presbyterian 

BBBBBBBBBBBJMBaMBa ChUTCh 



9:15 t.m. Wonbip Service 

9: 15 a.m. Sunday School 

10:30 a.m. Worship Service 

5:00 p.m Contemporary Service 

6:00 p.m. College Student Dinner 




Kct. Ajui* Scbelber, Aaaoc. Pmator 
Rav. R.C. McCoiuieU Putot 

801 Leavenworth • 537-4M18 



h ti ii.l1iAtiiri'Miuitili:iltiin i 



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MnwonaOM (QHla ClutMl 
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Aamrr rmtiM/ir All v,o r. . 



Rev Todci Weston Pastor 

nd Dr M,ir.l>,iH*in KS 
S3 3 www iiuniinllnnag org 



■ OiverMty ProtjrammiiK| {cwnminpe 
rfprfientatnre tolleen Loo 

■ Union Governing Board reprranutivt 1 
Ashley Soldi 

■ New senators tor the College ot 
Engineering Kyle Hum hka and Ryan 
Hannebaum 

Presidential cabinet 

■ Chief of Staff Ben Davis 

■ Academic Duality Coordinator: lawn 

hpp 

■ College Council Coordinator Kelsey 
Frasier 

■ Executive leant Program Director: April 
Clydesdale 

■ Ciovemmenlai Relations Ufcwtor Kevin 

Phillips 

■ International Affairs Director Sham 
Kashyap 

■ Manhattan SaJmd Relations Director: 
Patrick Rrnearson 

■ Multicultural Affairs Director Dominick 
James 

■Public Relations Director: Melissa 
Hiide brand 

■ Residence Hall Liaison: Leshia Hansen 

Judicial appointment 

■ Attorney General: Shiloh Dutton 



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OPINION 



- 



Page 4 

TO THE POINT 

Tuition waivers 

give break to 

underpaid faculty 

K- State's faculty members are under- 
paid and deserve a break. A tuition 
waiver could help their financial situation. 

The Kansas Board of 
Regents recently 
permitted each of the 
Regents universities to 
draft their own 
proposal on how to 
handle tuition waivers. 

K-State is in that 
planning process now. 

The average K-State 
faculty salary is more 
than $9,000 below the 
Big 12's average. 

As students, we 
appreciate the faculty's 
dedication to the 

university, but it's obvious that there are 
better choices out there financially. 

A tuition waiver could help retain well- 
trained faculty, especially if K-State is 
doing the training. 

Keeping assistant and associate profes- 
sors would be a particular bonus to a 
waiver plan, since K-State spends money 
training them. 

It also seems unfair spouses and 
children of faculty are having to pay the 
full rate. In a way, faculty members who 
have spouses or children attending 
K-State are working to pay hack their 
employer. 

Although plans are not finalized yet, it 
is good K-State and other Regents schools 
have the chance to come up with a 
proposal that best fits the university 

We hope K-State considers the plans 
carefully and comes up with a plan that 
not only works well for the faculty, but 
also doesn't burden student body by 
making them pay more. 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Friday, April 29, 2005 



To the point inn 
editorial selected and 

debated by the editorial 
bond and written alter 
a majority opinion is 
formed This is the CoJIe 
gian's official opinion. 

Abblt Adams 
Michael Ashford 
Johanna Barnes 
Ryan C. Flynn 
MattGirard 
James Hurl* 
Kristi Hurta 
Jesse Manning 
Sarah Bice 
Joanna Ruble*: 
Leann Sullen 
Bill Wall 
I on I Woolery 



WRITE TO US 

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America's favorite victim 

Rabbit on death row stirs compassion, curiosity; Internet shouldn't be taken seriously 



ie Salvation Army, 
lcart ^^p>k 

or m ^ 

JLL 

AMY HUES 



My roommate is a world class philanthropist 

She donates clothes to the Salvation Army, 
she walks in the American Heart 
Association's annual Relay for 
Life and recently she has been I 
advocate for America's most 
worthy cause SaveTbby.com. 

In case all of you hap- 
pen to be out of the loop, 
let me catch you up to 
speed about the fight for 
Toby's life and what one man is doing to save it. 

Toby is a bunny. 

A cottontail to be precise, and it says on 
Savelbby.com that if the owner of Toby does not 
receive $50,000 USD in his account by June 30, 
2005, he is going "to take Toby to a butcher to 
have him slaughter this cute bunny" 

That's right folks Toby will die unless we ail 
band together and save him 

Toby's tortured story includes his being found 
underneath his owner's porch after an unfortu- 
nate meeting with an alley cat and nearly dying 
from the injuries of the encounter but fighting 
through it all to be a well-behaved and 
healthy little rabbit 

Apparently there is no real good rea- 
son for the upcoming slaughter of Amer- 
ica's favorite victim - only that the owner 
is poor and needs some cash fast. 

And he's doing all he can, mind you 

On the Web site, you can purchase Toby mer- 
chandise of all sorts: T-shirts, coffee mugs, truck- 
er hats and, of course, a recipe book entailing 
exactly how Toby will be cooked when he meets 
his maker 

See? The owner wants Toby to live, and he's 
giving you all an opportunity to save him by pur 
chasing this merchandise. And if you aren't in- 
terested in a Napoleon- Dynamite -inspired "Vote 
for Toby" ringer-tec, a simple donation through 
PayPal will also be graciously accepted. 

You all might be out there laughing right now 
at the absurdity of such a cause. 

Who in their right mind would actually do- 
nate money to this sociopath who is going to kill 
his beloved pet and eat him in "Toby stew?" 

Plenty of people, actually 

To date, SaveTbby.com has raised more than 
$28,000 for the cause, and commerce on the site 
isn't slowing at all. 

They have corporate sponsorship banners 
ranging from iPod to the new Playstation PSP, 
and they were even featured on NBC Nightly 
News with Brian Williams 

For something as idiotic as bunny-murder 
sounds, it sure is getting a lot of attention across 
our nation. So why is this important, you ask? 

Thousands of people every day condemn the 
Internet for its pornography, voyeurism and abil- 
ity tn ruin lives with the click of the mouse 
Blogs are destroying real journalism and 
thought, and any amateur hacker can find out 
the digits to my credit card number to spend 



"$1 ,500 on a leather bustier." 

Is it really such a stretch to see a bunny basi- 
cally auctioned off until he is murdered? 

The Internet is a crazy person's paradise 

So I guess, like everyone else who has ever 
visited SaveToby.com, I'm going to sit back and 
see if this ever actually comes to pass 

And while I'm waiting I just might splurge 
on a Toby for President T-shirt for my room- 
mate. Like 1 said, she's always up to sup- 
port a good cause. 







Illustrations by Amanda Dink*! | (WltCIAN 



Politicians only care about one thing: a winning strategy 



led 
ur 

'j^rK: 

SCOTT stm 



Politicians in Washing- 
ton are playing you like a 
finely-tuned 
fiddle. 

By play- 
ing to your 
moral val- 
ues 

and ex- 
ces- 
sively 

entangling religion in poli- 
tics to achieve their own 
political goals, conserva- 
tive politicians are using 
you. 

Conservative Republi 
cans are upset because 
Senators like Minority 
Whip Harry Reid, D Utah, 
are threatening to filibuster 
votes on ultra-conservative 
nominees to federal judge- 
ships. 

Senators, led by majori- 
ty leader Bill Prist, R-Tenn , 
are attempting to change 
Rule 22 of the Senate, ef- 
fectively ending the unique 
institution of a filibuster. 

Senators have histori- 
cally used their right to un- 
limited debate to prevent 
matters from being voted 
on. 

Allowing a filibuster to 
be ended by a mere 51- 
vote majority would create 
what our founders called a 
"tyranny of the majority" 



in which the rights of the 
minority would be tram- 
pled. 

This move is supported 
by members of the radical 
right and neo-conservative 
political groups who dab- 
ble in religion. 

John Adams said, "It 
is. as necessary to defend 
an individual against the 
majority in a democracy as 
against the king in a 
monarchy" 

The power of the minor- 
ity party to filibuster some- 
thing they don't like is a 
crucial check on the power 
of the majority 

It is for these reasons, 
among others, mat our 
founders established the 
Senate, where unlimited 
debate was enjoyed 

In order to prevent the 
balance of power from 
swinging too far to the mi- 
nority. Senators passed 
Rule 22 in 1917 It allowed 
a 3/5 majority of the body 
to invoke what is called 
cloture and end a filibuster. 

In 1841, even before 
Senators passed Rule 22, 
Henry Clay attempted the 
same thing Prist is trying to 
do today and was vehe- 
mently rebuffed by sena- 
tors on both sides who un- 
derstood the importance of 



filibusters. 

Prist, a 2008 presiden- 
tial hopeful, spoke in a 
televised sermon/campaign 
speech to millions of evan- 
gelicals who want Bush's 
anti-choice judges to be 
appointed 

The irony of this situa- 
tion is that Bill Prist tried 
to filibuster Clinton ap- 
pointees in the 1990s. 

In fact, filibusters be- 
came famous when Sen 
Strom Thurmond, then an 
ultra-conservative Dixie - 
crat, spoke for 24 hours 
and 1 5 minutes, even re- 
sorting to reading the 
phone book and wearing a 
catheter, to filibuster the 
Civil Rights Act of 1957. 



Why weren't Republi- 
cans trying to change the 
rules then? 

The answer: they were 
in the minority then, and 
filibusters were a crucial 
part of their strategy. 

What frustrates me is 
that people don't realize 
when they are nothing but 
a part of a strategy. Repub- 
licans do not care one lick 
about Terry Schiavo or gay 
marriage or the merits of a 
filibuster. 

They, like Democrats, 
care about one thing and 
one thing only: winning. 

If you feel like Bush's 
nominees deserve an up or 
down vote, fine - but real- 
ize that you are nothing 




more than a pawn in a po 
I ideal game of chess 

Bush is trying to pack 
the court with judges who 
will overturn the actions of 
"rogue" judges in cases like 
Roe v. Wade and Lawrence 
v. Texas 

Conservatives say 
judges are abusing their 
position by "making law" 
when they protect a 
woman's right to privacy in 
her reproductive decisions 

|udges are "making law" 
when they protect a cou- 
ple's right to privacy in 
their sexual activity (note 
both homosexual and het- 
erosexual couples are In- 
cluded) 

However, judges would 
be doing the right thing if 
they were to have ignored 
centuries of contract and 
family law to take away 
Michael Sehiavo's power 
of attorney. 

Hypocrisy happens in 
Washington. It's the nature 
of the beast. All we can do 
is remain intelligent and 
critical and evaluate things 
for what they are 

=^aaaaaaaaa— a* 



ScattSawftis 




CAMPUS FOURUM | 395-4444 « fourum@spub.ksu.edu 







« yw enter SSI worth of and tap two 

ra^fcoJiUraiSeaWrulr^ihoufci 

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Friday, April 29, 2005 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



PageS 



Vet Med to host 
Dog-N-Jog event 



By Jessica Holland 

KANSAS STATE {OUKWN 

The K- Stale Veterinary Med- 
ical Teaching Hospital and the 
K-Stale College of Veterinary 
Medicine (KSUCVM) Class of 
2006 are hosting the 10th annu- 
al Dog- N -[ogon Saturday. 

The race partially benefits 
KSDS, formerly known as 
Kansas Specialty Dog Service, 
which is a non-profit organiza- 
tion that places dogs with peo- 
ple who are visually impaired or 
physically disabled 
" The other portion of the pro- 
ceeds will go to K Slate's 2006 
Class of Veterinary Medicine 
students The money wilt help 
i Ri students pay for their gradu- 
ation, since those in the College 
of Veterinary Medicine must 
pay for those fees themselves, 

Lindsey Crumly-Blevins. the 
event coordinator, said in past 
years Dog-N-fog has raised 
around $3,500 and that they are 
hoping for the same outcome, if 
not better, this year. 

So far about 25 people and 
their dogs are registered, but 
anyone who wants to partici- 
pate in the event can register the 
day of the race at 8 am during 
check -in at the Race Headquar- 
ters at 1800 Denison Avenue, 
which is at the west entrance of 
K-State Veterinary Hospital 

There will be a 10K race and 
a 5K race, which will both begin 
at 9 a.m. At 10 30 a.m. there will 
be a less-intense, Pun Run race, 
which is targeted more towards 
families and walkers and is 
wheelchair accessible. 

Maps of the courses will be 
provided at the event starting 
line, and halfway through the 
race courses will be a water 
break and a doggie pool so that 
participants may refresh them- 
selves 

After all races are finished, at 
1130 am there will be an 
awards ceremony for partici- 
pants The awards are provided 



by the event's corporate and 
local sponsors, which include 
Purina, Bayer, Pizza Hut, The 
Senate Luxury Suits, 4 Olives 
restaurant, Chipolle, Pepsi, 
Endzone, Papa John's and many 
more. 

Anyone can participate in 
the fun, Crumly-Blevins said. 

"You don't even have to have 
a dog to participate Two years 
ago we had a man run with a 
snake," she said. 

People of all ages are encour- 
aged to attend with their pets, 
and the College of Veterinary 
Medicine is expecting many re- 
peat participants as well as new 
ones. 

Patricia Payne, professor of 
diagnostic medicine pathobiolo- 
gy at K State has participated in 
Dog- N- Jog for the past eight 
years and plans on running 
again this year as well. 

"Last year my KSDS puppy- 
in-training and I participated," 
Payne said 

"It's always very fun and it's 
also for a very good cause. We 
always have a good time." 

New and special events have 
been implemented into this 
year's scheduled. There will be a 
silent suction from 10 a.m. to 
noon for prizes, awards for par- 
ticipants and their pets, and an 
agility course provided by Man- 
hattan Kennel Club 

Also, the Humane Society 
will be at the site with adoptable 
pets, and Pets Without Partners, 
an animal adoption organiza- 
tion from Kansas City, Kan . will 
have greyhounds at the site that 
are up for adoption as well. 

Crumly-Blevins said the 
event is great because it benefits 
both humans and their pets 

"It's good socialization for 
any dog to get out with other 
dogs, and it's a good human -an- 
imal bond," she said 

"It's really a unique opportu- 
nity for you and your pet to get 
the spring off to a start and to 
get some exercise ." 



Walking for a cause 



By Joanna Rubfek 

WN5AS STATE CQUEOHI 

Manhattan residents can 
walk for a cause this weekend. 

A walk to raise funds for 
multiple sclerosis on Saturday is 
sponsored by Alpha Delta Pi 
sorority. 

"We always try to find a free 
weekend, but that's pretty much 
impossible in the spring," said 
Laura Farmer, development co- 
ordinator of the eastern Kansas 
branch for the society 

The goal for the Manhattan 
walk is $15,000 

Registration starts at 9 a.m. 
Saturday at the corner of Third 
Street and Poyntz Avenue. 

Laura Parmer, development 
coordinator for the MS society, 
said there will be rest Stops with 
snacks along the walk and 
lunch at the end, all free. 

"Each year we strive to have 



If you go 

Multiple Sclerosis walk 

When: Registration begins at 9 a.m. 
Saturday The walk begins at 10 a.m. 
Where: Thud Street and floynti Avenue 

more walkers and raise mors 
money," Farmer said. 

Lauren Cox, president of 
Alpha Delta Pi, said all mem- 
bers are required to participate 
and raise $25. 

MS is a neurological disease 
Sometimes it gets to the point 
that it causes paralysis and/or 
blindness 

"People that are diagnosed 
with MS arc usually in their 
early 20s. Typically they are 
young adults," Cox said 

Cox said MS is a worthwhile 
cause 

" 1 think the MS that affects a 
lot of us, if not directly then in 
directly," she said. 




Kansas state collegian 



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IMRlh 
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INTRUST is. the eiduslw 
provide! of VMdtat Vim 
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* AJurrvii AKSociMtirjfl 





UNION] 

Monday Night Specia ls 

may 2 $1 Dollar Night 

I in Union Recreation 
Tuesday & Wednesday 



' She • 17* torn ■ 1/1 few |*r * lj Wl &■*> 



f* k p Outside of the 

SA LE Bookstore 

CkthiM •Jiifts * Posters • And More! 



MIY3 &4 




lY3 



Wednesda y 



Tuesday-Friday 
Sidewalkf A I f 

9am-4pm jHLL 



11am-2pm 
Ice Cream Cones 



Union Courfycrd 

IrtlMio-MMnt pnwWad by Union Program Council 




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i SPECIALS 



t .47 ( Fountian Refills 

on o^filtoble mugs 34oz or Less 

.93 < Hot Dogs 



Cots' Den • 1st Floor 



MBBfli 



SPORTS 



Page 6 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Friday, April 29, 2005 



SOFTBALL 






Club takes 

2nd at 

national 

championship 



By Michael Ashford 

KANSAS SHTKOLIEGMN 

Jessica Elliot could have played 
softbatl on scholarship after high 
school. 

A junior in modern languages, 
Elliott received interest from 
schools such as Iowa Slate and 
Drake University to play softball, 
but she turned down those offers 
and came to K-State instead, even 
though there is no NCAA Intercol- 
legiate team at K-Slate 

"I wanted lo come to K- State to 
get a different experience," Elliott, 
an Iowa native, said "I just want- 
ed lo get out of state, and I wasn't 
sure if I wanted to continue play- 
ing softball in college" 

But Elliott is playing softball in 
college as a member of the K-Statc 
Softball Club, and this past week- 
end, Elliott helped the team to a 
second-place finish at the Nation- 
al Championship Tournament in 
Annapolis, Md. 

"It feels really great," Elliott 
said "There were more teams this 
year, and there were lots of east 
coast schools, which are pretty 
competitive" 

As the No 16 seed of 21 teams, 
K- State lost its opening round 
game against Virginia Tech 10-9, 
but went on to win its nest six 
games to reach the championship 
game 

I thought they did incredible," 
coach Richard Baker said "They 
came up (h rough the losers brack- 
et and that meant they couldn't 
lose a single game. They played six 
straight games without losing, and 
1 think it shows incredible deter- 
mination" 

During K-State's six-game win- 
ning streak, it defeated teams from 
Navy by run- rule, Ohio and Wash- 
ington State 

"There are a number of times 
when people played far and be- 
yond what is normally expected of 
them," Baker said. "Only one of 
our catchers could go - Heather 
Martin caught all 12 games. Kacie 
Kennedy - one of my pitchers 
(Shannon Stadler) had a torn 
ACL, so Kacie pitched, in one way 
or another, in every single game in 
the tournament." 

When K-State reached the 
championship game against West 
Virginia on Saturday, the Wildcats 
had played three games in four 
hours prior to the match-up, while 
West Virginia had played just 
once. 

The Wildcats went on to lose 1 - 
0, but Baker said if his team had 
had time to recover, the result 
would have been different. 

"They were well -rested," he 
said "If we had had a rain delay or 
if we had had another hour, we'd 
probably be national champions I 
really believe that." 

For their performances, four 
Wildcats were named to the All- 
Tournament Team: Lacie Spain in 
center field, Kennedy as pitcher, 
Kayla Linnebur at first base and 
Elliott at shortstop. 

"It's nice to be recognized like 
that, being one of 10 girls from 21 
teams," Kennedy said. "It's quite 
an honor, and 1 appreciated it" 

Coupled with last year's third 
place finish at the national tourna- 
ment, Kennedy said the second 
place finish this year will earn the 
K-State team respect in the com- 
ing years 

"Coming in second and getting 
third last year gives us a lot more 
legitimacy," she said. "It lets people 
know we're competitive, but we 
still have fun, and we're a good 
club to be a part of" 



ROWING 



Rowers to compete in Big 12 Invitational 



By Ben f allin 

KANSAS STMUQUlGIAIt 

K-State's rowing team will compete 
against Big 12 Conference rivals Kansas 
and Texas at the fifth annual Big 12 Invita- 
tional this weekend in Austin. Texas 

Kansas was the first Big 12 school to in 
troduce women's rowing as a varsity sport 
in 1995, K-State added it in 1906. while 
Texas added the sport to its list in 1998. The 
Wildcats hosted the first invitational in 
2001, and since then, the three schools 
have met in the Big 12 Invitational 

Last year, the event was limited to short 
sprint races and yielded no official results 
due to weather concerns. 



Head coach Patrick Sweeney told his 
team it has the potential to win the invita- 
tional, but said then- are mental chalk RfM 
his squad must overct n M 

"Coach tells us that it's all between our 
ears," suphotnore First Varsity 8 rower 
Larissa Kesler said "He knows we can do 
well, he's encouraging (We) definitely need 
to mentally challenge ourselves We're too 
scared mentally 

Tlie Wildcats have already faced both 
Kansas and Texas in competition this sea- 
son K-State took back the Kansas Cup 
from the Jayhawks for the first time since 
1998 on April 9, defeating the |ayhawks 9- 
8. The then 15th ranked Longhoms edged 
out K-State by a few seconds when the (wo 



teams met at the Longhom Invitational 
March 18-20. 

The members of the First Varsity 8 team 
said they have some added motivation 
going into this weekend's. 

"My, and probably the team's goal, is to 
beat KU," Kesler said "We (First Varsity 81 
lost to them last lime out." 

Sophomore Kaci Williams said she 
wants to finish the season on a high note 

"We want to finish the year strong," 
Williams said. "We haven't met our hill po- 
tential yet." 

K- Stales next action after the Big 12 In- 
vitational will be May 14-15 al the Central 
Region Championships in Oak Ridge, 
Term 



BASEBALL 



It's payback time 



Wildcats, 
Jayhawks 

renew 

Sunflower 

Showdown 

rivalry with 

3-game set 



By Matthew Glrard 

KANSAS StAIt COtlLOIAN 

Motivation won't be hard 
to find this weekend for the 
K-State Wildcats as they take 
on in -state rival Kansas 

The Wildcats (22-18, 6-12) 
are riding a two-game win- 
ning streak, have won seven 
of their last eight games to 
help them move into the cov- 
eted No 8 spot in the Big 12 
Conference standings - the 
top eight teams move onto the 
Big 12 tournament in Okla- 
homa City - and have won 
two consecutive conference 
series for the first time under 
Coach Brad Hill, 

"We are playing much bet- 
ter baseball," Hill said. "We 
feel good about what we are 
doing and were we are going" 

If making it to the tourna- 
ment for the first time since 
2002 wasn't motivating 
enough, the Jayhawks (27-20, 
4-10} swept the three-game 
season series last season. 

"It's a big weekend for us; 
you get the KU-K-State rival- 
ry on top of where we are in 
the standings," sophomore 
)ared Goedert said. 

Although Kansas has only 
won four league games and sit 
in last-place in tlie standings, 
the Jayhawks have won three 
of their last four coming in to 
the Sunflower Showdown, 
and two of the three games 
will be played at Hoglund 
Ballpark in Lawrence 

Hill said it will be impor- 
tant for the Wildcats to get 
that first win 

"We'll start with Friday and 
go from there," Hill said 

"The big thing right now is 
to play well at home on Friday 
night" 

Kansas is led by reigning 
Big 12 Player of the Week, ju- 
nior A). Van Slyke, who had a 
.545 batting average last week 
with six doubles and two 
home runs. 

On the season, Van Slyke is 
batting .316, leads the team in 




Photos by Chrii H»newin<k«l | (OUfCIAN 
Jared Goedtrl fields* ground lull *a*insi the Aggies tail weekend. Goedert will If ad the Wildcats when they host Kansas tonight. 



If you go 

K-State vs. Kansas 



: 6:30 tonight, 7 p.m. Saturday 
and 2 p.m. Sunday 
Where: Tonight's game at Tomton 
Family Stadium. Saturday and Sunday 
at Hoglund Ball park in Lawrence 
»:KMAN(13S0AM) 



RBIs with 46 and home runs 
with nine. 

The Jayhawks lead the all- 
time series 153-149, but the 
Wildcats have a 84-74 edge in 
Manhattan. 

K-State is led by Goedert 
who has hit 392 with nine 
RBIs in his last eight games. 
On the season, the Concordia, 
Kan , native leads the team 
with a .358 batting average 
and is third on (he team in 
RBIs with 29. 

Goedert said the plan is 
simple 

"We're planning on taking 
at least two out of three from 
them," he said, "Hopefully 
three." 




Coach Brad Hill argues » all with an umpire during K States game against Tens 
A&M HM and the Wildcats will try to continue their hot streak as they open a 
three-game series with the Untwnlty of Kansas tonight at Tomton family Stadium 



Baseball team proves columnist wrong; Wildcats just starting to reach peak 

mmimmmum 



I hate being wrong 
Bum when I know I'm 
, I won't give in - as my 
i attest - but even 
. against my nature. 
HI admit 

1 was wrong about this 
yea/t K StataT 







When the Big 12 Confer- 
ence season opened in March, 
and the Wildcats lost their Snt 
four conference series - includ- 
ing sweeps at the hands of Mis- 
souri and Baylor - 1 wasn't sur- 
prised. 

In Coach Brad Hill's first 
season. K-State only won one 
conference series - against 
Missouri - and won hurt four 
conference games total, finish 
ing last in the conference. 

So of course, 1 thought it 
was going to be another year of 
dealing with the growing pains 
of a new coach given the way 



the Wildcats started out this 

tmtan 

Three weeks later, K State 
has won two consecutive con- 
ference series, swept Wichita 
State for the first time in 50 
years and have a legitimate 
chance at making the Big 12 
Tournament for the first time 
since 2002 

Sitting in eighth- place in the 
conference standings, the Wild- 
cats arc peaking at the right 



K-State has won seven of its 
last eight games and is third in 
the Big 12 in team batting 



(.309) The Wildcal hitters have 
given their pitchers substantial 
run support in their last seven 
wins, averaging 7,5 runs per 
game 

With the run support, the 
pitching staff has been cruising 

The staff has allowed 4.6 
runs per game in Uieir last eight 
games and have a strike nut to 
walk ratio of almost two strike 
outs per one walk 

t was certain it would be al 
least three to four years before 
we would see what Hill could 
really do here at K State, and I 
was right until HiU's team came 



out of nowhere. 

With three-game series* 
egjfJnaj tin- lowly Kansas (ay- 
hawks and a struggling Okla- 
homa Sooners squad, I have to 
say I'm officially on the Wildcat 
bandwagon, and this team is 
going to make it to the Big 12 
Tournament in Oklahoma City 

I guess the old saying is true 
- it's not how you start, it's 
how you finish 



ha 



■priM 

at 




Harvey 



1-MINUTE 
DRILL 

The Associated Press 

MLB | Royals recall Harvey, 
option Camp 

KANSAS CITY, Mo— Ken Harvey, 
Kansas City's only All- Stat last year, was 
retailed from 
Omaha on 
Thursday and 
right bander 
Shawn (amp was 
optioned to the 
Triple-A farm 
team 

Harvey 
started at first 
base Thursday 
against 

Minnesota He was hitting 375 with 
thrw doubles, three home runs and 14 
RBIs in Omaha 

Camp (0-2) had a 12. 15 ERA In 6 2- 
3 innings and was demoted after 
throwing just three pitches — a hit 
batter, a wild pitch and a two -run triple 
— in a 9-4 loss to the Twins. 

NFL | Chiefs giving Heisman 
Trophy winner a look 

KANSAS CITY, Mo— Jason White, 
who won the Heisman Trophy at 
Oklahoma but 
was snubbed in 
the Nfl draft, 
was signed 
Thursday for a 
tryout at Kansas 
City's rookie 
camp 

White and a 
number of 
other rookie 
(tee agents will 

join the Chiefs draft class at Arrowhead 
Stadium this weekend 

White threw for 8,012 yards and 
81 touchdowns at Oklahoma, winning 
the 200] Heisman and taking the 
Sooners to consecutive national 
(hampionship games m 200} and 2004 

CB6 1 Innocent plea in fraud 
case by former coach 

WICHITA — A former Barton 
County Community College assistant 
men's basketball coach pleaded 
innocent Wednesday to federal charges 
that he falsified academic credentials 
and wort-study time sheets for some of 
the college's athletes, including former 
University of Missoun player Randy 
Pulley 

Mark Skillman, 10. of Russell*, 
Ark., entered his plea at an initial 
appearance in US District Court in 
Wichita He was released on $10,000 
unsecured bond, which he doesn't have 
to pay as long as he shows up for his 
scheduled court appearances 

Skillman was an assistant at the 
school, located in Great Bend, Kan., 
horn 2002 until resigning in December 
2003 He worked under former mens 
coach Ryan Wolf, who faces 38 federal 
charges of fraud and embeulemeni 
stemming from his tenure at the school 




White 




Blake 



CFB | Former coach testifies 
in Nebraska player's trial 

NORMAN, Okla. — former 
Oklahoma head coach John Blake testt 
fied Thursday that one of his defensive 
linemen at 
Nebraska plowed 
into an 

Oklahoma spirit 
squad member 
and not an offen- 
sive lineman on 
trial for felony 
assault 

Blake, who 
coached the 
Sooners from 
1996101998. 

testified that defensive end Wall 
Muhammad accident ally slammed into 
Adam MemTt, 19, during drills pnor to 
the Cornhuskers' game al Oklahoma on 
Nov. 13, 2004. 

Former Nebraska offensiw 
lineman Darren Detone is on trial on 
one felony charge of aggravated assault 
and battery He has pleaded innocent. 
The charge carries a possible punish 
merit of up to five years in prison 

NHL | Oldest former league 
player dies at 95 

TORONTO — Reginald "Red* 
Homer, a member of the Hockey Hal of 
Fame who was 
thought to be the 
oldest former NHL 
player, has died 
He was 95 

Homer died 
Wednesday in 
Toronto, me NHL 
said In a state- 
ment The 
league said N 
believed Homer 
was the oldest Kvmg termer NHL player 

Homer played 1 2 seasons for the 
Toronto Maple Leafs The detrnseman 
began hts career in 1928 and helped 
Toronto wtn Its tint Stanley Cup in 1 932. 
He was selected as a town captUn to 
WSarvJretamed that tote untt he 
reared to 1940 He was elected hi the Hat 
of ran* to 1965. 




1 



■ tWf ST-* *■***? *" + ■**-*■**? 



-■ 



ARTS | ENTERTAINMENT | SEX | FOOD | YOUR LIFE 

THE EDGE 



Friday, April 29, 2005 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 7 



Counting her blessings 




Photo* by Chris HanewlntM | COI I WM 

Audrey Bakft. sophomoi* in dementaiy education, enjoys playing the puno in the basement of Moore Hill. Baker ht\ been wearing a prophetic arm since the was five. She ptayi the trumpet at well as the piano. 

Humor, determination enable student to reach others with disability 



By Chrlttina Hansen 

KANSAS MATE COLUMN 

"What happened to your ai i 
gasps Audrey Baker, aghul 

Her face stays frozen, eyes wide 
in mock horror for a few mott 
onds before she erupts inlo laughter 
Born with no hand nr forearm 
below her left elbow, Baker, sopho- 
more in elementary education, hears 
this question on almost a daily basis, 
and long ago grew accustomed to it. 

"There's really no way to pin- 
point why it happened," she said 
shrugging God just had a plan 

Indeed, Baker doesn I waste any 
time dwelling on her situation A 
sophomore in elementary education, 
her schedule is packed with 
job, volunteering and homework just 
like any other Student 1 ' 

She has been wearing a prosthetic 
arm since she was live years old. and 
uses il skillfully 

Baker plays the plana and the 
trumpet, is learning the guitar, and 
she played on her high school has 
ketball team 

Lay la El-Chanii, sophomore in 
family studies and human tei \ lost, is 
a friend and co worker of Bak 

"Audrey is truly inspirational She 
greets not only each day with a smile. 
but each challenge as well. 

It was no accident that she was 
born with one arm. instead it was a 
God -given gift that allows her In 
touch others in such a unique way," 
El-Chami said 

Although people often assume 
she is incapable of certain activities 
because she only has one arm. Baker 
said she believes there is nothing she 



"When people think I 

can't do something, 

it makes me more 

determined to do it." 



sophomore m u m WARY fDUCATlON 



cannot accomplish 

"When people think I can't do 
something, >t makes me more deter- 
mined to do it," she said 

Baker said her family is the 
biggest influence on her altitude to- 
ward life 

lk-r parents, J mi and Bev, and her 
three brothers, Zach, Caleb and Jor- 
dan, never treated her like she had a 
rJUabitlt) 

"I was given the opportunity to 
COnM MHMthing 'lie world 
would view as harsh or hard lo deal 
with," Baker said 

It has been kind of fun" 

Having one arm has actually 
opened many doors for Baker 
throughout her life. 

Sfac says people's curiosity about 
her prosthetic often allows her to 
strike up a conversation, and relate 
to them on a very personal level 

No matter who you are, or what's 
wrong with you, it's something every- 

tfl relate lo," Baker said. 
"Everyone is disabled in some way 
everyone has challenges to over* 
BOM 

Instead of sadness, Baker speaks 
about her arm with a candid sense of 
humor 

Those close lo her have heard her 




Baket checks a list of residents while working the front desk in Moore Hall last wee*. 



tales of shutting her prosthetic limb 
in car doors, using il at drive-through 
windows, and losing il on nunicr. 
occasions 

Baker said humor tn.ikcs other 
people more comfortable talking to 
her aboul her arm 

"You can either have fun with 
something, or be negative about It," 
■Id 

Baker has not pled and 

adapted to having one trm, but nid 
thai it has made her failli in ' 



i^icr 
"(Having one arm) lias been a 

i tig in the waj I see mysetl 
which is probably the opposite of 

:i mORl people would llniik, she 
said 

it has enabled me to dn so much 
- in love people and lo 

Baki ' lil. to the fullest. 

and nid ihe It. is no regrets concern- 
ing her physical condition, 

"I truly think thai everyone 
should have one arm" 



Reporting sexual assault helps prevention 




IACEY STOKER 



Even though April is nearly over, I 
still feci it is important to recognize 
that April is Sexual Assault 
Awareness month, It's im- 
portant to recognize that 
past because April is the 
official month of sexual 
assault awareness, that 
doesn't mean It's 
the only time we 
should think aboul 
it 

You have all surely heard some of 
the scary statistics about sexual as- 
sault, such as every two and a half 
minutes someone in America is sexu- 
ally assaulted Sexual assault ranges 
from attempted rape to rape 

Bui one of the scariest statistics 
about sexual assault is how often it 
goes unreported, Every year thou- 



sands of people who are sexually as- 
saulted don't tell the police. 

According to the Rape, Abuse and 
Incest National Network's Web site, 
about 39 percent of sexual assaults 
wliii unreported in 2003. Other sites 
show numbers that are drastically 
higher 

There are a multitude of reasons 
why assault victims may not want to 
report what happened. Some feel 
ashamed of what happened, and per- 
haps even guilty, as if it is their fault. 

Some victims may not want to 
admit what happened to them Not re 
porting the attack makes it easier to 
deny it happened 

Similarly, of those victims who do 
report sexual assault, few choose to 
prosecute their attackers, for several 
reasons 






For more information 
on sexual assault 

Contact the Women's Center at SJJ 6444 or 
www. Jan. eriu/Wwnemr rrrftr 

If they know their attacker, they 
may not want to "get anyone inlo 
trouble," or they may be afraid of what 
will happen when they report it 

Victims of sexual assault may mil 
wanl lo call attention to themselves 
afterward, or they might worry about 
information getting out in to i lie pub- 
lic. 

Whatever reason they have for not 
wanting to report. an attack, reporting 
it is one of the first things victims 
should do. Not only does reporting 
sexual assault decrease the chance the 
attacker will strike again, but it can 






also help the victim deal with what 

Ikis happened 

According lo the Web site for the 
r for Victims of Crime, 
victims who chose tn prosecute 
felt "a feeling of accomplishment and 
empowerment," because they are try- 
ing to prevent their attacker from at- 
tacking someone else 

inns also reported that they got 
a sense of closure, whether or not 
their attacker was prosecuted, which 
made it easier to put the attack behind 
them. 

If you are ever the victim of sexual 
assault, or if you know someone who 
is, remember bow important tl is lo 
immediately report the attack, Not 
only could it help the victim deal with 
what happened, it could prevent tl 
from happening to someone else. 



MOVIES 



■ Times for today through 
Thursday. 

■ All timet arc p.m. unless 
otherwise noted. 

"A lot like love" (PG 13! 
5, 7:50, 10 
Ashton Kutcher 
stars in director 

Nigel Cole's 
feature about a 
man ami a 
woman who find 
love, but unfortu- 
nately the timing 
is not right for 
either of them 
However, fate 
seems to step in 
and bring the two back together 




Kutcher 



"Amltyvill* Horror" (R> 

5:20,7:20,9 30 

A young couple (Ryan Reynolds. Melissa 
Georqel and their children move into h 
house that was once the site of* 
horrific seties of murders 

"fever Prtdi" JPG 13) 
4:45,7:20.9:45 

This Nick Hornby adaptation follows a 
math professor who's obsessed with the 
Boston Red Sox and an English teacher 
who comes to his college as a guest 
lecturer 

"Guess Who" (PG 13) 

4:30,7 15.9:45 
A remake of the 1967 Sidney 
Poiiiet-Kathanne Hepburn drama, this 
comedy follows a young man named 
Simon (Ashton Kutcher) as he meets his 
fiancee's father, Percy (Bernie Mac), fot 
the first time. 

Hitchhiker s Guide to the Galaxy* 
(PG) 5 05, 7 JO. 9:55 
Hitchhiker's Guide begins as Arthur 
Dent (Martin Freeman) realizes that his 
house is about to be demolished. He 
soon teams from Tout Prefect (Mas 
Oef ], his friend — who is really an 
alien — that the whole faith is going, 
to be destroyed In order lo build an 
mtergalactit highway bypass. 

"Kings Ransom" I PC- 13) 
7:20, 9:35 

A corrupt, wealthy businessman 
[Anthony Anderson) plots his own 
kidnapping when he finds oul his wife 
is going to divorce him and possibly 
take half of everything he owns. The 
plan seems foolproof, until he finds out 
that several other people ate planning 
to kidnap and ransom him, loo 

"Million Dollar Baby" (PG 13) 

4, 7, 10 

A retired boxer named Frankie Dunn 
Ifhnt Eastwood) runs a gym in Los 
Angeles with another former fighter 
i Morgan Freeman) Dunns still troubled 
by his painful estrangement from his 
daughter, and he's surprised when a 
female boxer, Maggie Fitigerald (Hilary 
Swank), walks into his gym 

Miss Congeniality 2* (PG 13) 



Sandra Bullock 
will again play 
Grane, an FBI 
agent who, on 
her last mission, 
assumed the 
guise of Miss Mew 
Jersey in the Miss 
Liberty pageant 
to prevent a 
terrorist group 
from bombing 
the event 




Bullock 



Phantom of the Opera" i PG- 13 1 
4 

Ihe Phantom [Getard Butler) is a 
masked man who roams around the 
Paris Opera House and haunts the 
singers. 

•Sahara' (PC. 13} 
4, 7, 9:45 

Explotet Dirk Pitt (Matthew 
McConaughey) and his slacker sidekick 
(Steve Zahnl embark on a treasure hunt 
through West Africa in search of what 
locals call the Ship of Death, a lost CivH 
War battleship that may house a very 
valuable cargo 

-SkiChy(R) 
4:10,7:10,9 55 

This drama follows Marv. a tough guy 
who meets the girl of hrs dreams, 
Goldte, only to see her murdered on 
that same night. Marv then searches 
every bat and shady hideout in Sin City 
looking fot the killer 

"The Interpreter- (PG- 13) 

4:15,7:10,10 

Nicole Kidman plays a U.N, interpreter 
from South Africa who unintentionally 
hears details of a political assassination 
plot and has to convince a FBI agent 
that something bad's going down. 

"XXX: State of the Union" (PG- 1 J) 

5:25,7:45,10 

This sequel follows the adventures of a 

criminal (ke Cube) who is coerced by 

NSA Agent Gibbons (Samuel L. Jackson] 

Into becoming a field agent under men 

new "XXX* program 



^m 



l^^^^m 



■— - - ■ - 



*• * e» i» ss»es»se>^e»i 



CLASSIFIEDS 



To place an advertisement call 



Page 8 



II ■ ■ ■ ■ — 



■ ■ V. ■ ■ 

L- EL 1 I 1 : 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



II I I ■ ■ 

■ ■ ■ i_i 




Friday, April 29, 2005 



Deadline* 



LET'S RENT 



Forfterrt- 

Apis Furnished 

STUDIO APARTMENTS 
On* block from campus 
Ampto parking, quiet condi- 
lions Furnished 0' unfur- 
nished June and August 
S3IS (785)539-3638 

For RBfil- 

Apt 

Unfurnished 

1500 Large two-bedroom. 

Dishwasher, disposal cen- 
tral air June t Pats ok 
(786)3177713 

£975 MONTH Early Bird 
discount offsrl Four-bed- 
room, two And one-half bath 
lown home with washer/ 
dryer provided Call 
1785)537-2111 

1026 BLUEMONT One 

and two-bedroom. June 1 . 
1 785)317-7713 

111? BLUEMONT on* 
block to campus, rwo-bed 
room available August 1. 
1 785)776-9?88 or (7851776- 
0683 

1126 BLUEMONT- Studio 

apartments with all Dills 
paid Neutral colors with 
nice carpets Overlooking 
Aggieville with off street 
parking Saw* on parking 
permits and walk to campus 
Available June 1 No pets 
(785)313-4812. 

12 1 5 PONYTZ- One-bed- 
room basement apartment 
with neutral colors and tut 
size windows Large walk -in 
Oosel All bills paid $425 
August No pats (785)313- 
4812. 

1215 THURSTON On* 
block to campus One-bed- 
mom apartment Newly ren- 
ovated $390 AH bill* paid 
June lease No pets 
(788)63>0548. 

1832 CLAFLIN across street 
from MarlHTT Hall Nice, 
clean two-bedroom apart- 
ment First month rent 
tree- June tease No pels 

-'•.-,■■ |q 0M9 

1844 ANDERSON, new 
construction, ihree-bed- 
room. two balh. persona) 
washer/ dryer, htflh-speed 
internet available June 1 
(785)554-3456 or (785)585- 
1310 

626 VATTIER- Twt>-bed- 
roorn spacious apartment, 
laundry facilities Water/ 
trash paid One year lease 
August 1 1430, (785)539- 
8704 

■14 THURSTON: Two-bed 
room. June year lease No 
pets Water' trash paid. 
Close to campus $625. 
(785)S3M13t. 

•IB RATOME, One-bed 

room downstairs $425 "17 
Keemey. on* or two-bed- 
room upstairs. S425 620 
Colorado, basement effi- 
ciency. $275 No pets Aur 
gust. (7851/76-8548 

91 1 Sunset, tour -bedroom, 
one) block to campus, 
washer/ dryer provided 
Available August i 
1765)776-9266 or (785)778- 
0663 

A BLOCK to Campus Nice 

and clean Two-bedroom 
$500- $550. attentive land- 
lord No cats or dogs Jun* 
and August leases 
(785(539 5506 

A ONE-BEDROOM Jun* 
1. 1704 Fairview 1100 
Kearney 1026 Bluemont 
(785)317-7713 

A TWO- BEDROOM, nice 
large, dishwasher, central 
•ir One year or 6 month 
tease (785)317-7713 

BLOCK TO CAMPUS Spa 
clous two-bedroom. No 
pats Water and trash fur- 
nished (7^838-4588. 

CLOSE TO campus: 1030 
Kearney. Studio, one-bed- 
room apartment, and one- 
bedroom house Jun* and 
No 
Call 
(*1t)72»«*41 

FOUR BEDROOM ONE 
Mock Id Aggievtne, washer 
and dryer. June lease 
(786,456-? 138 



CRESTWOOO APART- 
MENTS West side two- 
bedroom, one and one-halt 
Oaths Personal washer/ 
dryer, fireplace, pool Water, 
trash, cable paid No pets 
$570- $670 (TtS)77*-334S 
BMBjbMJ ■Tf* M *** BflU 

FOUR BEDROOM/ TWO 
bathroom. Neat old home 
near park and campus, new 
remodel, water/ trash paid 
pels, laundry, Aug. I, 
( 91 3(21 8-4462. 

NEW 12-PLEX available 
Jun*. Two bedroom, luxury 
apartments to 10 Biuemonl, 
two ADA Inendly $800 
$825/ month. (785)778-2102 
or (785)556-2014 No pets 

NEW DUPLEX three-bed 
room Central heat/ air. 
washer/ dryer hook-up, dish- 
washer, oft street parking, 
two lull baths, water and 
trash paid Don't miss this 
one' (769)341-2911 or 
(769)776-3211. 

ONE AND two-bedroom 

apartments, many close to 
campus with washer/ dryer 
No pets. Call (785)341-1990 
or (785)34 1 -3365 

ONE TWO three tour-bed- 
room apartments and hous- 
es June and August 
leases No pets Call 
(785)639-1975, (7851313- 
8296 

ONE- AND two-bedrooms 

Walk to campus, covered 
parking. June i and Aug. 1 
leases, vary mcel (718)341- 
•000. 

ONE-BEDROOM AND Stu- 

dio apartments. One-bed- 
room. $280* month Sludio 
$260/ month AH utilHie* ex- 
cept electric paid Leas* 
and deposit required Avail- 
able June I (7B5)537 7794 



ONE-BEDROOM 
mant. 1229 Clatlm $415/ 
month plus deposit No pets 
(7851456 2812 

ONE -BEDROOM apart- 
ment. Gas/ water/ trash 
paid Laundry tadtmes One 
year lease June 1 , $360.00. 
(785>5JS-4704 

ONE-BEDROOM NEXT to 
campus Trash and water 
included Available June 1 
or August 1 (765)313-7473 



WALK TO CAMPUS Spa- 
cious two-bedroom apart- 
ments, tots ot windows, qui- 
et condtBone, ample park- 
ing, furnished or unfurnish- 
ed, washer/ dryer in apart- 
ment, reasonable rant 
June and August Mo pats. 
(785)939-3638 




$1000 FOUR-BEDROOM, 2 
bath duplex Only four 
yaara old. Good Sited bed- 
rooms June Emerald Prop- 
erty Management (785)558- 
6899 

11200: FOUR-BEDROOM, 

TWO bathroom duplex, 
three blocks from campus 
and Aggieville One year 
old. available August 1 Call 
Brian at (765)845-61 12. 

$439 TWO- BEDROOM du- 
plex with central air and 

washer/ dryer August 
Emerald Properly Manage - 
(785)5 



WITH 

neutral colors lor August 
Across from City Park with 
off -street parking. Local 
landlords who care and 
maintain the property Wa- 
ter/ trash paid. No pets 
(785)313-4812 

ONE-BEOROOM. AVAJLA- 
BLE August Close to cam- 
pus Water/ trash paid. Cen- 
tral air (719)537-7810. 

ONE-BEDROOM TWO 

blocks to campus and Ag- 
gieville Waaher/ dryer 
Pets ok (7151317-7713 

PRE LEASING JUNE and 
August Some units brand 
new, close to KSU. waeheW 
dry*r Included CaH tor de- 
tails (785)776-2102 or 
(785)556-2014 No pets 

THREE-BEDROOM CLOSE 
to campus Central air. 
dishwasher laundry labili- 
ties No pets (785)539- 
0866 



1116 COLORADO Street 

Foul large bedrooms, two 
bath New central air sys- 
tem, ail ma|or a ppe an c es . 
washer/ dryer Included. Au- 
gust lease $225/ room 
(820)272^149. 

725 MOHO. Nice four-bed- 
room, near campus, Aggie- 
ville Large detached ga- 
rage, washer/ dryer dish- 
washer $1000/ month, 
Available June 1 (913)710- 
4730 

A CLOSE ell or flve-Oed- 
room two bath, central air 
Dishwasher, washer, dryer. 
pels okay June 1 
(786)317-7713. 

A GREAT yard for bartoe- 
cuea and tun. Spacious 
houses Three, tour, and 
rive-bedroome All applian- 
ce*. Close to stadium 
Please 0*1(785)938- 11 77 

POUR LARGE bedrooms 
louf-bedroom, two balhroom 
house New csrp*t, central 
•ir. dishwasher, washer/ 
dryer included August 1 
lease. $1160/ month 1022 
Humboldt. Doug (785)313- 
SS73, 

FOUR-BEDROOM HOUS- 
ES, duplexes, apartments 
Next to campus, central air. 
ott-straat parking, free 
waaher/ dryer. Fall leases 
No pets [715)937-7090. 

FOUR-BEDROOM TWO 
bathroom house Washer/ 
dryer. August t 1306 Yu- 
ma. (785)313- 4963 

FOUR-BEDROOM, TWO 
and one-half bath at $979/ 
month. (719)937-2111 or 



LOOK I BRAND NEW 

HOUSEt Four-bedroom, two 
bath Washer/ dryer, refriger- 
ator, central air One-halt 
mile to campus August 
lease $1400/ month Under 
construction 1614 Pierre 
(765)304-0387, (785)776- 
9124 

MOVE IN Now. 1019 Hour 
ton Three-bedroom with 
day room upstairs Kitchen 
appliances Near City Park, 
downtown, and Aggieville 
$645 |4I7)B49-242B 

NEAR AGGIEVILLE tour 
bedroom house, central air- 
conditioning, off-street park- 
ing, $1000 per month plus 
utilities (78S)637.6070 

NEW LISTING: Available 
•oon. Three-bedroom, two 
bath Large living room, 
gam* room, computer room. 
Located al 916 Bertrand, 
washer/ dryer, central air, 
yard, front porch (785)539- 
3672 

NEW SPACIOUS four-be* 
room duptoi. two bath, two 
full laundry, game room with 
wet bar 928 Osage $1200 
(785)539-1564 

NEXT TO campy*. Two 

and four-bedrooms, houses, 
duplexes Washer/ dryer, 
central air. No pels Fall 
leases (719)637-7060. 

NICE HOUSES tor rent 

Thro*, four, five and eight- 
bedrooms Close to cam- 
put June. July and August 
leases Call Clin (620)24?- 
7623 

HENT-APlfLCOM, NOW 
leasing houses, apart- 
ments, and duplexes Avail- 
able now June. Jury , and 
August www.reni-6Dm.sorr), 

(785)530-4357 

STUDIO ONE, two, three, 
tour, and live -bed room 
houses and apartments 
Close to campus Washer/ 
dryer Central heat/ Air-con- 
ditioning No pets (788)567- 



TWO AND tl 
rooms Close to campus 
Spacious, dishwasher, cen- 
tral air, laundry tac#hes No 
pets (765)539-0666 

TWO-BEDROOM APART- 
MEMT. $430/ month Across 
Irom KSU campus Availa- 
ble June 1. Lease and de- 
posit required [785)537- 
7794 

TWO-BEDROOM APART- 

MENTS, Available Jun*. Ju- 
ly, and August 1114 Ber- 
trand ($560), 1200 Fremont 
($600- $640), 701 N 9th 
($600- $650), 2014 Season 
($530), 523 Moro (SS30), 
363 N 14th ($520- 600) 
www.rant-apm.oom, 

(785)53*4357 

TWO-BEDROOM BASE- 

MENT Apartment Laundry 
included No pets 51 1 Blue- 
mont. AvalatHe June or Au- 
gust 1. $430 pkis utilities 
(716)311-046! 

TWO-BE D ROOM . ONE 
bath Close to campus 

1626 Anderson Water and 
trash paid (7$fi)M1-44M. 



to campus. MOO/ month 
12-month lease available 
Jun* 1 or August 1 No pets 
(716)771-0301. 



1, Four 
rooms, two bath house 
Central air. washer/ dryer 
and fenced yard $1060/ 
month 1305 Pierre Doug 
(788)313-5573. 



ROOMMATE WANTED: 

preferably male to share 
two-bedroom house with 
central heat and air One- 
hall block from campus. 
Jun* I**** Call Tom 
(785)341-2096 

ROOMMATES WANTED 
foi a lour bedroom house on 
Pierre Great rant Call 
(620)727-3205 



FOUR-BEDROOM. TWO 
bath duplex 1410 Houston 
by City Park Washer/ dryer, 
off-street parking No smok- 
ing, no pets $1150/ month. 
Available August 1 
1765)776-9260 

FOUR-BEDROOM. TWO 
bath house Single car ga- 
rage, central air. dishwash- 
er, fireplace West side of 
campus 1900 square toot 
Available August 1. Doug 
(715)313-5573 

FOUR-BEDROOM. TWO 

bath house Close to cam 
pua and KSU stadium 
Plenty off-street parking 
June Emerald Property 
Management (785)556- 
6899 

FOUR-BE DHOOM, TWO 
bath houae Washer/ dryer, 
great location Spacious in- 
terior Some pets okay 
(913)063-7422 

FOUR-BEOROOM. TWO 

bath large house Close to 
campus Washer, drysr. 
dishwasher, air $250 each 
person fTs»)77*-210O. 

HOUSE FOR mnt Tnrtw- 



THREE. FOUR, five-bed- 
room houses Close lo 
campus Otf-slreel parking 
Washer/ dryer June and 
August leases (719)449- 
2111 

THREE-BEDROOM AVAIL- 
ABLE June Close to cam- 
pus Fenced yard Pets on 
approval (789)937-7810 

THREE-BEDROOM DU- 
PLEX. Available June 
Trash and mowing paid 
Central air Washer/ drysr 
(785)537-7810 

THREE-BEDROOM 
HOUSE, 1516 Campua. 

$900/ month Close to Vet 
Med Teaching Hospital 
Jun* lease (720)733-1659 
evenings after 7 00pm. 

THREE- BEDROOM 
HOUSE June/ August avail- 
able $1100 electric/ gas/ 
water/ trash paid Washer/ 



(715)341-1107. 



TWOBEDROOM. $590 
Three-bedroom, $750 

Close to campua Washer/ 
dryer, central air (719)778- 
2100 



FEMALE HOUSEMATE. No 
drinking/ smoking. $2797 
month. One-third utilities, 
washer, dryer August 
tease amka3130kau.edu 
or (318)744-3790 



GUYS SHARE 

$300/ month and share uttiit 
tss Close to City Park After 
1 pm, call (719)456-9109 



Nitu I CaHJrtK I'M 

2trfl5»2<MMi! 



1109 Kearney A Block to 
campua Two-bedroom 

apartment, washer/ dryer 
$475 all bills paid. Two 
month lease June and July 
No pels (765)31 7-302 1 



ALL BILLS paid, tour-bed- 
room, two bath. pool. Inter- 
net, washer/ dryer As soon 
as possible Contact Devon 
(913)406-7236 



universiTY 

rp O m m \ n 

2215 < "Hi at W. 



APARTMENT FOR 
mer sublsss* Nice two- 
bedroom apartment. Quiet 
location $500. Call 
(715)7764006. 

FEMALE SUBLEASERS 
wanted June and July 

Four-bedroom house, clean 
and spacious 616 Kearney 
Available mid-May 

(785)341-6022 

FURNISHED ACROSS the 
street Irom campus at 1721 
Anderson Four -bedroom 
female only, trash paid, 
call (785)539-9636 




Runt 



THREE-BEDROOM HOUS- 
ES and apartments. Jun* 
and August lease* Close to 
campus No pets (785)539- 
1975or(785)313-9296 

THREE-BEDROOM HOUS- 
ES and apartments starting 
at $790- $1100 Close to 
campus. June and August 
leases No pets (785)539 
1975ot(7BS)313-B296 

TWO YEARS Old Four 
bedroom, two and one-half 
bath AIL appliances includ- 
ing washer dryer, micro- 
wave Great floor plan with 
large bedrooms No pets 
August $1200 (716)556- 



HOUSE THREE-BED- 
ROOMS available lor sum- 
mer sublease Big house 
and bedrooms, good loca- 
tion (926 Laramie) Air-con- 
ditloning, furnished, great 
roommate Rent negotia- 
ble! < 6 2 ) 353 8 5 2 8 . 
(785)770-3457 

LARGE TWO-BEDROOM 
two bath available June 1 
July 29 Apartment complex 
is Campus East located at 
Ci oil in and McCain Lane 
Has pool, balcony, fireplace, 
dishwasher, and microwave 
Pats allowed Close lo 
campus and Aggieville Rent 
is $265/ roommate or $530/ 
month <7B5)341-9257 

ONE-BEDROOM APART- 
MENT tor aubtaan. Swim- 
ming pool, free cable TV, 
balcony, on-site laundry fa- 
cility $300/ month Jun* 
and July (765)341-9878 

ONE-BEDROOM SUB- 
LEASE and thro* bedroom 
aubleaae avauabe tor June 
and Jury Emerald Property 
Management {785)556- 
6899 

ROOM AVAILABLE in four 
bedroom apartment May 
Jury 31 Close to campus 
large rooms Rent $215 (ne 
gohabio) plus cheap utilities 
May rent paid. (718)341 
3539 

SUBLEASER NEEDED 
two-bedroom, on* bath, two 
blocks to campus, on* block 
to Aggieville Rant ISM/ 
negotiable June/ Jury. 
(719)539-4487 

SUBLEASER(S) WANTED 
Clean two-bedroom apart- 
ment Walking distance from 
campus Summer lease 
available mid-May 1200/ 
person Can (316)268- 
1330 

SUMMER SUBLEASE 

$250/ month at University 
Commons Fully furnished 




WILDCAT 

PROPERTY 

MANAGEMENT 

S37-2332 

Anderson Village 

(Across from KSU) 
I BD for Aug. 

$460 

1507 Poyrvtx#I 
2BD @ $550 

l509Poymz#l 

I LG BO @ $550 

washer and dryer 

All Bills Paid 

June or August 



JUNE. JULY August Now 
leasing one, two. three, four- 
bedroom apanm*nis arid 



all subi a sea f**s plus $50/ 
month rent! Caff Tim 
(620)795-1079 

TWO-BEDROOM APART- 
MENT Across from City 
Park, with waahar/ dryer <i 
each una Water and mash 
paid $450 per month No 
pets Summer leeei 
Juty (789)539-0222 



by th* mat Waahar/ dryer 
and dishwasher Available 
lor summer Rent negotia- 
ble Cat (7*6)770-2224. 




9JJ 



»Nq*» 













1£ARN TO F1YI* 
Frying Club ha* five air- 



es* (785)776-1744 



a form of pea- 
bin K> (KBU. driver's 8- 411* 








TOWN 
HOMES 



ot Human 
at Cfty H*H, 



Reach 

.more 
readers 



OsTmc 



101MO29 McCoflum 
2 Bedrooms 




715-MT7701 







C\ AtCILlLH a tic ' 

CLARIFIED ADS 

fUSMWOUaFORVOb 







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MMl 




ONE, THREE AND lour- 
IMdrooma No smoking, no 
drinking, no pass, (71S)53ft- 
1554. 

ONE. TWO. three and lour 
bedroom apartments Cto** 
to campus srw Agakwsl* 
Dishwasher, laundry, and 
parfcma (710)63741017 

ONE, TWO, three bed 
rooms Available jun* and 
August (716)537-7131 or 

(Ti6)ata-i?a«. 

PAJW f»LACl AJ»AHT- 

MNTt. Hutryit sulttiarii 

One- two- sVm- 



ONE -BEDROOM. NICE and FIVE, SIX and seven bed- 
spacious Pets OK Sub- room house (two- three 
leaser needed immediately kitchens) Available June, 
10 take over lease at Chase July, and August Several 
Apartments. Can (913)466- locations. www. ran t- 
2889. apm com (769)539-4357 



ONE BEDROOMS AND stu- 
dios Close to campus. 
Available June and August 
www renf-apm com 
(785)539-4357 



FCrUR-BEDFtOOM AT 1521 
Leavenworth SI, SM0, ait, 
uWWes paid. June occupen- 
cy (78^)539-9401 

FOUR-BEDROOM HOilS 
ES, duplexes, apartments 
Men to campus, central air. 
off-street parking, tree 
washer/ dryer Fall leases 
No pets (719)537-7090. 



Apt 
Unfurnished. 

$475, CLEAN, roomy two- 
bedroom, one and one-half 
bath In nine pie « No pels 
One-year lease 3032 Kim- 
ball (785)539-6846. 

AVAILABLE AUGUST 1: 
Clos* to campus. One-bed- 
room apartment (785)587- 

0620 

AVAILABLE JUIMF 1 Four 
bedroom duplex, 500 Lara- 
mie B, $285/ room, two 
baths, washer/ dryer, centra) 
air, dishwasher Call 
(785)410-2916. 



OPEN HOUSE 
WILDCAT VILLAGE 

4 Large bedrooms 

Urge walk-in doacu 

1630 sf, on 2 levels 

Lavatory in each bedroom 

TV area ml wet bar 

& fridge 

Lota of outdoor spai i> 

Stainless steel appliances 

Pull stxe washer & dryer 

Storm safe room 

Cable TV included 

11300 per month 

2 blocks North of Kimball 

on College Ave. 

OPEN WED & FBI 
3-5 pm 

or ('all for 

appointment 

776-2425 or 566-3760 



UNIVERSITY 
TERRACE APTS. 

Spacious 2 & i Bedroom Afd. 

Vfaktr/Drytr 

or Washer /Dryer Hoohipi 

Spacious Grounds & Pad 

NnPrtJ 
1530 College Ave. 

CALL 537-2096 
9 a.m. to 6 p.m. 



Three Bedrooms 
Near Campu*. 



1838 Anderson 
516 N 14* St 
U25 Ratone 



1780 
S7S0 
$735 



519 N Manhattan $750 
1019 Fremont $640 



Two Bedrooms 

519 N Manhattan $580 



Brookstde Mgmt 
537-1746 



STUDIO APARTMENT 
June 1 Washer/ dryer pro- 
vided $350 Pets naooaa- 

WS Cr-B5)S39-9S8? 

STUDIO APARTMENTS 
029 Humboldt. $340. 1521 
Leavenworth $350 air, June 
occupancy, bills paid 
(765)539-8401 

THREE AND tour bedrooms 
available August Close lo 
campus Water/ trssh paid 
Central air. coin-operated 
laundry. (785)537/810 
(786)537-2255 

THREE -BEDROOM 
APARTMENT Very men 
$810 June 1- Aug 1 Near 
AgasviHs (785)537 2661 

THREE-BEDROOM AT 815 

N 10th St $720, also 930 
Osage $736, uMMes paid, 
June occupancy {785)539 
8401 

TWO-BEDROOM APART- 
MENTS, duplexes, and 
fiouses Several locations 
Available June, Jury, and 
August www reni apm com 
(71» r S3»4367 

TWOBEDROOM CLOSE 

to campua Private balcony 
Central air New 
dishwasher June 
(785)341-5070 

TwoaeDnooMS. june i 

and August 1 Cloee to cam- 
pus and AggtsvHe Washer/ 
dryer provided $600- $540 
Pats negotiable (765)539- 
sfat 



NEED MALE roommates to 
Inln I four-bedroom two 
bathroom, nice house. 
Washer and dryer Off 
street parking. $250 plus 
one.lourth utilities Call 
Slavs at [318)708-8298 

ROOM FOR rant tor sum 
met. Females only. Cheap 
rant Close lo campus CM 
(7B6)7e»47S«. 



FOUR AND frve-bedrooms 
Available June and August 
(785]537-7138 or (785)313- 
1258 

FOUR-BEDROOM HOUSE. 

Waaher/ dryer Nice large 
rooms Oft street parking 
(785,537-1568 

FOURBEOROOM HOUS 
ES and duplexes Several 
locations Available June. 
July, and August Pets al- 
lowed in most www rent- 
apm com. {786)539-4357 

FOURBEOROOM, FOUR 
balhroom Available August 
New construction. Close lo 
campus and Aggieville No 
pets. Washer/ dryer provid- 
ed Central air (785)539 
9582 

FOURBEOROOM, TWO 
bath house 1715 Colorado 
Washer/ dryer and dish- 
washer Available June. Ju- 
ly, or August $1200/ month 
(785)539-0991 

FOUR-BEDROOM. TWO 

bath, 918 Thurston, all appli 
ancea, a if -conditioning, 
laundry Clean, no pets Oft- 
street perking August lease, 
$1000 plus utilities 
(785)323-0061 

FOUR-BEDROOM. TWO 
blocks from campus 1535 
Hams $1000/ month Call 
(786)294-0362 or (785)336 
0202 

FOUR-BEDROOM. TWO 
blocks west of campus 
2030 College Heights $275/ 
bedroom Newly remodeled 
Washer/ dryer, central heal, 
air -conditioner June t 
lease (785)944-3491 Pets 




FOUR-BEDROOM CLOSE 

to campus/ City Park Waah- 
ar/ dryer and dishwasher 
Large house June tease 
(786)341.5070 

JUNE, JULY, August Now 
leasing one, two. three, four. 
five. six. seven, eight-bed- 
room houses and duplexes 

{785)538-4367 

NEW LISTING: Available 

soon. Three-bedroom, two 
Oath Large living room 
game room, computer room 
Located al 918 Bertrand. 
washer/ dryer, central air, 
yard, (rant porch (785I539 

3672 

NEXT TO campua. Two 
and four -bedrooms, houses, 
duplexes Washer/ dryer, 
central air Mo pets Fall 
leases (785)537-7050 

THHEE TO tour- bedroom 
home Washer/ dryer Cloee 
lo campus $225- $250/ bed- 
room Available June 1 De- 
posit required No pets 
(785)539-6096 

THREE BEDROOM 
HOUSE on College View 
Cloee to weal side ot cam- 
pus Available June 1 $840/ 
month {785)257-3488 or 
(785)478-0222. 

THREE-BEDROOM 
HOUSE June I Central air 

Pets allowed Waaher/ dryer 
provided $825 1 785} 539- 
8682 

THREE BEDROOM HOUS 
ES. apartments, and duplex- 
es Several locations Avail- 
able June, Juty. And August 
Pats allowed in most 
www renf-apm com 

(785)539-*357 

THREE BEDROOM. ONE 

bath house with dan 
Range, refrigerator, washer/ 
drysr included Realty dose 
to campus Must see 
(765)463-6014 

THREE-BEDROOM TWO 

bath home Clean, newly re- 
modeled, new appliances 
Off-street parking and ga 
rage $900 rent Flexible 
lease starting date 
(785)341-6615 



^r 



NEW FINANCE Plan svaas- 
Me on 2002 and newer, two 
and three-bedroom homes 
Only $1000- $2000 down. 
easy credit approval, and it 
oasts lees than renting Cell 
Today (786)639-6841 ot 
(866)609-6336 (Terms and 
Conations Apply). 




BRAND NEW1 Two and 

three bedroom manufac- 
tured homes for rant 
Cornea wtth all appliances. 
Including washer/ dryer 
Rent prices asVtrsj at $660 
a month. Call today! 
{786)539-6841 (Terms and 
appry) 




810 HOUSE 



18'XSO* 2001 Senute Sen- 
setoo TnrvsHMdroom two 
bash. $29,500 or beat oiler 
Al clean. Qood fW)«a5-0724 

eonrjston. f7BB)KI7-22e9 ^^_^^^_^____ 
TWO BEDROOM ONE bath 



lads must be •• 

plar^ by ixx>i today '*• 
before you want your at) 
to run. OassMed display 
ads must be placed by 
4 p.m. two working day* 
piiot to If* date you mem 
youfadtoiun. 
QUI 532-6555 



ClassifiedRATES 
1DAY 

20 wurdfl or less 

18.25 
each word over 20 

20e per word 

2 DAYS 

20 words or less 

59-65 

each word over 20 

25e per word 

3 DAYS i 
20 words or less 

$1130 

each word over 20 
30c per word 

4 DAYS 

20 words or less 

$12.50 

each word over 20 

35C per word 

SDAYS 

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$13.60 
each word over 20 
40c per word "* 
( corsseojtrve day rate 7 



TO PUCE AN AD 

GotoKedzie 103 . 
(across from the 
K-State Student Union), 

Office hours aie 

Monday through Friday 

from 8 a m to 5 p.m 

The office is open 

except on holidays. 



HOW TO PAY 

Al classifieds must be 

paid m advance urtteat 

you have an account 

with Student 

Publications Inc 

Cash, check. 

MasterCard m Visa are 

accepted. There is a 

$t0 service charge on 

all returned checks, 

We reeerve ihe right to 

edH, reject or property 

classify any ad 



FREE FOUND ADS 

As a service to you, we 

run found ads (or three 

days tree of charge. 

CORRECTIONS 

H you find an error in 
your ad, please cat 1 us 



bitty only for the firel 
wrong insertion. 



CANCELLATIONS 

If you sal your item 

before your ad hat 

expired, we wtt refund 

you lor the rernaiwigc . 

days You must cat qtj ; 

before noon the day^ "- 

before the ad is to bit; : 

pubfsshtd. **: 

HEADLINES ZZ 

For an extra charged 

welpulal 

above your ad to < 

trie reader's 1 




/;/:/ 



huTU-tlr 



housin g/* 



DUPLEX: LAflOC tour-bed mobile home Gala and 

room, two and one-ha* baft amal dags stowed Lot rent 

near Oswpus and Aetfevfaa Si 45/ month fSQOO or best 

PiB)fM7-t»'7 oner. (Tf«)Se7.7e05 




» 



J -J-M-f 






CLASSIFIEDS 



To place an advertisement call 



Friday, April 29, 2005 




KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



310 



AVAILABLE FALL Male or 
female non-smoker No 
pets Three- bedroom 

Washer' dryer Cable/ Inter' 
net S35GV month 2036 Shir- 
ley Lane (913)568-6233 
April 

FEMALE WANTEO Four- 
bedroom, two and one -halt 
bajh Vanity.' sink In each 
room One • ) o u rl h utilities 
One block from campus 
Start August 1 Jan 
(6201620-3745 Hannah 
(913)669-4501. 

FEMALE WANTED Share 
two-bedroom house One 
block to campus Available 
May 1 $250. all utilities 
paid Call (780)537-4947 

RESPONSIBLE FEMALE 
roommates wanted tor luxu- 
ry four-bedroom apartment 
across street from west 
campus No pels, no smok- 
ing, short lease okay 
(785)7764318 

ROOMMATE NEEDED. 
June or August. $245/ 
month, one- third utilities 
about 160, heat paid, across 
from City Park Call Adam 
(620)655-1101 

ROOMMATE WANTEO 
Nice three-bedroom home 
Washer/ dryer included Pet 
tnendly June 1 lease $225/ 
month plus one-lhird utilit- 
ies Call Cami (785)317- 
3494 

ROOMMATES NEEDED, 
pay one-fourth utilities Nice 
house, fenced-in backyard. 
quiet neohborhood CaH tor 
derail. (316)461-7377 

ROOMMATES WANTED 
New three -bedroom, two 
bath house August Lease 
Outside pets okay Call 
Bnan (785)567-6447 

WANTED ROOMMATES to 
share three-bedroom apart- 
ment next lo campus Lrliht 
ies paid Central air Wash- 
er, dryer $325 each August 
I o» belore (785)636-5446 
I78SI565-3405 (785)562- 
675S 



CHEAP SUMMER sublease 
at University Commons 
Asking $550 total lor mid 
May- July All utilities paid 
Fully furnished Call 
<913)5&B-1726 

FEMALE SUBLEASER lor 
two-bedroom apartment 
Close io campus One-hall 
utilities Wanted May 15 lo 
Aug 15 Call (620)260- 
6266 

FEMALE WANTED (or June 
and July sublease $200/ 
month or negotiable One- 
hall block Irom campus, 
washer/dryer, trash and wa- 
ter paid Call (785) 341- 
8110 

FEMALE WANTED tor aum- 
mer sublease Starting May 
15, ending in August $180/ 
month plus utilities Ten mi- 
nute walking distance lo 
campus Four-bedroom, two 
bathroom house. Washer/ 
dryer Call (785)776-9746. 

JUNE/ JULY Chase Apart 
ment One bedroom m four- 
bedroom with three guys. 
$250 per monlh plus elec- 
tricity (620)544-9527 or 

baugruruinettian 9 tioimail c 
em 

ONE-BEDROOM APaW- 
MENT available lor June 
sublease. Close lo campus 
Also available for August 
Lease price negotiable Call 
(785)341-9536 

SUBLEASER NEEDED lor 
June and July rent $189 
plus one-third utilities Call 
(7B5)650-5071 ask tor Dan- 



SUBLEASER NEEDED' 
Walk lo school and Aggie- 
ville One-bedroom apart - 
menl $275' month June 
through July Available May 
23 Call Roy [785)341-8487 

TWO-BEDROOM APART- 
MENT available tor summer. 
$520/ month Close to Ag- 
gieville Available June 
1005 Bluemonl (7B5I537- 
4426 



300 

employmen t/ 
opportufietttn 



ATTN: ARCHITECTURE 

students Los Angeles 
bssad design firm In need 
of draftsman. Looking for 
third or lourth-year stu- 
dent for part-time posi- 
tion. Make Los Angeles In- 
come with Kansas living 
cost. Must be proficient 
with AutoCad 3002 or later 
and be able to produce 
floor plana and detailed 
sections. Call JNH De- 
signs (310)754-91 BB. aak 
for 



The Collegian cannot veri- 
fy the financial potential of 
advertisements In the Em- 
ployment/Career classifi- 
cation. Readers are ad- 
vised to approach any 
auch employment oppor- 
tunity with reasonable 
caution. The Collegian 
urges our readers to con- 
tact the Better Business 
Bureau, 501 SE Jefferson, 
Topeka, KS 66607-1190. 
(788)232-0454 

Manhattan City Ordinance 

4814 assures every per- 
son equal opportunity In 
securing and holding em- 
ployment In any field of 
work or labor for which 

ha/ aha is properly quali- 
fied regard let* of race, 
sex. military statue, disa- 
bility, religion, age, color, 
national origin or ances- 
try. Violations should be 
reported to the Director of 
Human Resources at City 
Hall, (765)587-2441 

'BARTENDING" $300 a day 
potential No en penance 
necessary Training provid- 
ed Call 1-600-965-6520 em 
144 

GREAT SUMMER income 
Asbestos Abatement Work- 
ers needed 40 hours ol Iree 
training is required Class 
starts May 31 runs through 
June 3, 8:00- 4:30pm 
$1160 per hour Con tad 
Laborers' Local 1290. 710 
Moro. for an application or 
call (785)537-1567 



COL DRIVERS FOR SUM- 
MER WORK Coven World- 
Wide Moving is looking fot 
college students with a 
Class A or B Commercial 
Driver's License for full-time 
summer work Need lo slay 
m town lor summer slay in 
shape, and save soma 
cash? Great internship alter- 
native and take advantage 
ol your enisling lease/ rental 
agreement Job is to per- 
form packing, loading, and 
delivery ol household goods 
to our military and commer- 
cial customers along wilh 
dnving COL vehicle to a lo- 
cal ktbaite Apply as soon as 
possible at 61 5 S 1 tlh St 
on Fort Riley Blvd Very 
competitive $9 00 to $1 1 00 
hourly' incentive wages Job 
begins immediately follow- 
ing Spring finals week 
through summer and opllon- 
al pan-time work in Fall ot 
2005 Equal Opportunity 
Employer 



College Grade! 

jteMMrtltgtcMet 
wmtwim Kb ten' 

Premier Personnel 

www.preiTiierks.com 
<7B5) 273-9944 



CTUDIOS 

J AND 1 BEDROOMS 



1941 Cotlfgi* Heights 

• cat friendly 
731 N. 6th 
1304-1310 N. Manhattan 

• pel friendly 
1854-1858 Claflin 

• cat friendly 
411-413-415 N. 17th 

• close to campus 
1005 K I uf muni 

• close to Aggie vi lie/cam pus 
1700 N. Manhattan 

• adjacent in campus 
1722 Laramie 

• close to campus 
925-927 Denison 

• adjacent to campus 
1803-1807 College Heights 

• adjacent to campus 
210 N. 4th Street 

• newer complex, downtown 
700 Fremont 

• small, quiet complex 
1119 Laramie 

• with study 

• cat friendly 

• perfect for couples 



$390 

$390 
$390 





\!< < iiMotiiji ht'M'tn|MiK'iii Inc. 



210 N. 4th. Suite C • Manhattan, KS 66502 {£* 
(785) 776-3804 • mdi-manhsttan.i urn 



COLLEGE STUDENT want- 
ed tor summer childcare in 
my home tor two older chil- 
dren $5 .25/ hour atlef tan- 
as. Sam- 3pm Transporta- 
tion required Begins May 
31 (7851537-2B27 

DANCE TEAM Coach. USD 
378. Riley County is accept 
mg applications lor a Dance 
Team coach tor Riley Coun- 
ty High School Please con- 
tact Becky PulU •< 
(7851485-4000 Of 

bpuiuAiadSZfljira, 

DEPENDABLE, ENTMUSI 
ASTIC individual needed for 
a leasing agent position ai 
the new Aggie Village apart- 
ments Full-time summer 
position wilh part -lime 
hours available now and in 
the fan semester Must be 
wahng to wortt moet week- 
ends It interested, please 
apply at McCullough Devel- 
opment. IOC., 210 N 4lh 
Street Suite C. Manhattan 
KS 

DOES YOUR summer job 
tuck? If so call me I will 
take three more students to 
help me run my business 
Average earnings $700/ 
week Call (785)317-0455 

DRILL TEAM Coach: USD 
376 is accepting applica- 
tions lor dnll team coach for 
Riley County Middle School 
Please contact Becky Pulti 
ai beulUftujKl3JSj2rg with 
mailing address or call 
(785)465-4000. 

MAKE A Difference this 

summer working with chil- 
dren in the beautiful Colora- 
do Rockies Our outdoor 
program includes backpack- 
ing, rock climbing, mountain 
climbing, western nding. wa- 
ter activities, natural scien- 
ces, western history and 
mora Sanborn Western 
Camps, PO Box 167, Floris- 
sant, CO 80616, ianborn- 
weittrncanipt.com. 

(719)746-3341 



Wrstrlu^iThlt'k 

APARTM! HI ^ RESIOENI 

( andlewood l>r. , / ()- 1 1 I 8 Models Open Dai!) 



Now Leasing! 

Sp acious 1 & 2 Bedroom A pts. . 

A few homes remain for 
Graduate Students and Upper Class Serious Students 



Aincniiii'i 



• Great Location 

• Two Swimming Pools 

• Quiet Park-like Setting 

• Enormous Closets 

• On-Site Laundry 

• Private Fitness Center 

• Abundant Parking 

• Garages 

• Storm Center 



Customer Service 



Three-Time winner of 
the National Multi 
Family CEL Award for 
the #i Customer Service 
in America! 

• On-Site Management 

• Full-time Maintenance 

• 24 hr Emergency Staff 



VISIT .TODAY FOR I \l I AND SUMMER LEASING 

wwu.Wt'sti hesterParkAptSsConi 

WestchesterParkd Curiif.PropersyCo.com 




HeipWtfiMd 



FACULTY POSITIONS In 

Spam ah : Openings for part- 
time Lecturers in Spanish 
tor academic year 2005- 
2006 13500 par five hour 
course B A required; grad- 
uate work preferred Please 
send resume, names and 
telephone numbers ot three 
references lo Of. Judy Ber 
ry Bravo, Chair, Department 
of Modem Languages and 
Literatures, Pittsburg Slate 
University. Pittsburg. KS 
66782. For earliest consid- 
eration submrt by May 5 
PSU is an Equal Opportuni- 
ty. Affirmative Action Em- 
ployer 



FULL-TIME SUMMER help 
wanted Roof buss manu- 
facturing plant. 5107 Murray 
Rd . (7851776-5061 

GET PAID lor your opin- 
ions' Earn (15- S115 and 
more per survey! 
w w w mo neyf o r s u rve y t , c o 
ffl 

GREAT OPPORTUNITY 
Seeking a live in nanny, ref- 
erences a must, babysitting 
experience necessary 
(785)53 7-9699 

HELP WANTED tor custom 
harvesting, combine opera - 
lors and truck drivers Guar 
anteed pay Good summer 
wages CaH 1970)483-7490 
evenings 

HOMELAND SECURITY 
Kansas Army National 
Guard 'Up lo $15,000 Prior 
Service sign on bonuses 
"Up to J1 0,000 Non-Prior 
Service Sign on bonuses 
'100% Cottage Tuition As- 
sistance 'Si 8.000 Student 
Loan Repayment Program 
Contact SFC Mike Westphal 
at K-Stale University 
(785)532-2394/ Call 

(785)806-2121 Email 

mwestp.haJBJoujtdu 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 
Inc. has a part-time position 
for a Macintosh technician 
available immediately The 
tech support team maintains 
about 50 Macintosh work- 
stations, providing software 
supped as well as perform- 
ing general hardware main- 
tenance Apohcants should 
have soma experience with 
Mac OSX server and be fa- 
miliar with design software 
such as Adobe Photoshop. 
Adobe InOesign and Quark 
Express Any experience 
with networking, program- 
ming or with UNIX/Linux is 
also helpful Pay stairs at 
17 50 per hour with the op- 
portunity to advance Only 
students currently enrolled 
m spring 2005 lor at least 
six hours at Kansas State 
University can be consid- 
ered You are strongly en- 
couraged lo contact Michael 
Yopt at (785)532-0733 or 
stop by Kedzie 1 1 5 for more 
information about the post- 
tion Applications may be 
picked up m Kedtte 113 or 
119 or online at 
http:rYBDub.kau adu/tacftJan- 
p lie at Ion, mm I Please in- 
clude your current class 
schedule 

SUMMER CAMP JOBS IN 
COLORADO: Tomahawk & 
Flying G' Ranch. Live and 
work in the mountains SW 
of Denver General Counse- 
lors. Program Specialists 
(Western horseback riding 
backpacking, crafts, nature 
sports, challenge course, 
farm, plonear, dance and 
drama). Health Supervisors 
(RN. LPN. EMT WFR) and 
Administrative Positions 
Late May- early August 
Competitive salary housing, 
meals, health insurance, 
travel and end-ol-season 
bonuses To apply, visit 
www girlscoutsmilehi org/ca 
mpjobs or call (3031607- 
4810. 



Page 9 



910 1 



Hetp Wants* 



KANSAS STATE UNIVER- 
SITY INFORMATION SYS 
TEMS OFFICE PROJECT 
MANAGER. Tun position 
requires an experienced 
protect manager to lead as- 
signed Information Systems 
Office (ISO) protects Re- 
sponsituWMS include analy- 
sls ot proposed projects, e* 
lavishing and maintaining a 
protect scope, budgef, and 
schedule, lostenng a strong 
learn spmi. and managing 
protect resources Irom atari- 
up through elose-out In col- 
laboration with protect team 
members the position de- 
velops and documents proj- 
ect goals, objectives, critical 
success factors, and de- 
tailed project plan* Re 
sponatbtflties include ensur- 
ing protects are appropriate- 
ly resourced, tracking prog 
rest and costs agamst plan, 
providing timely status up- 
dates, maintaining project 
quality, and ensuring prey 
acts are successfully com- 
pleted If nol already a 
Stale ot Kansas iTPMM cer 
tilled protect manager or the 
equivalent, the person m 
this position will be expected 
lo obtain certification within 
a reasonable penod ot Urns 
Bachelor degree in Busi- 
ness Adminisl ration, Com- 
puter Science. Information 
Systems , or other appropn 
alely related field SALARY 
RANGE $52 000-60.000 
SYSTEMS SPECIALIST- 
FOOD SERVICE SYS- 
TEMS. This position is re- 
sponsible for technical lead 
ership, software impiemen 
lation and configuration, da- 
la conversion, and interface 
design and development lor 
a new food service and nu- 
trition management software 
system After successful 
System implements lion the 
position will provide ongoing 
Operational system support, 
maintenance and enhance- 
ments Bachelor degree in 
Bus mess Administration. 
Computer Science. Informs 
lion Systems. Software En 
gineenng. Systems Engi- 
neering or olhet appropri- 
ately related technical field 
SALARY RANGE $42,000- 
49.000 SYSTEMS SPE- 
CIALIST-STUDENT SYS- 
TEMS. This position is re- 
sponsible for software con 
figuration, data conversion. 
interface design and devel- 
opment for implementing the 
Oracle Student Solution ap- 
plication After successful 
System implementation, the 
position will provide ongoing 
application support, mainte- 
nance, and enhancements 
for the Oracle Student Solu 
lion Bachelor degree in 
Computer Science Informa- 
tion Systems. Systems En- 
gineering Business Admin- 
istration or other appropn 
ately related lectinical field 
SALARY RANGE: M2.000- 
49 000 APPLICATION 

PROCEDURE- Submit let- 
ter o' application expkcltly 
designating the specific po- 
sition for which you wish lo 
apply, resume and name, 
address and phone numbei 
ul three professional refer- 
ences lo Position Name 
Search Committee. Kansas 
Slate University. Information 
Systems Office. 2323 An- 
derson Avenue. Suite 215, 
Manhattan, KS 66502-2912 
APPLICATION DEADLINE 
Screening will begin May 
16. 2005 and continue unlil 
the positions are filled AD- 
DITIONAL INFORMATION 
See Employment Opportuni- 
ties at www ksu adufiao or 
email Iso^ksuedu Kansas 
Stale University is an equal 
opportunity employer K- 
Sfaie acaviery see*s drversi- 
ly among Its employees 



LOOKING FOR summer 
employment opportunity? 
Wort In agriculture-related 
business dealing with wheal 
breeding Salary negotiable 
Contact Jon al (785)210 
0818 



LUBE TECH/ Automotive 
Maintenance Specialist 
Part-time positions available 
immediately Call (765)565- 
5280 with personal informa- 
tion 

MOVIE EXTRAS/ MODELS 
Needed! Young facet need- 
ed lo fill a vanety ol (obs' 
Candidates needed for 
crowd and background 
scenes lor local productions 
No experience required 1 All 
looks needed! Up lo $22 
hourly 1 Call IBOO)280-Ot77 
now lor more information 



NOW HIRING Vista Drive 
in. a locally owned and op- 
erated quick service restau- 
I'jut ib adding to Our team 
Individuals must have a pos- 
itive attitude and be able to 
multitask and work well with 
others in a fast paced envi- 
ron menl We have multiple 
pan-time and a tew full-time 
positions available must be 
able to work during the day 
KSU students encouraged 
We offer meal discounts 
flexible hours and promote 
from wilhln Apply in person 
ai 1911 Turtle C'eek Blvd 



PART-TIME AND seasonal 
help in housekeeping de- 
partment Apply in person at 
530 Richards Dove 

PART-TIME COMMUNICA- 
TIONS Assistant needed to 
work 10- 15 hours per week 
This position will be respon- 
sible lor helping Communi- 
cations Manager to imple 
ment the communication 
strategy ol (he organization 
Candidate must possess ex- 
cellent communication, or- 
ganization, clerical and com- 
puter skills Website tech- 
nology experience e plus 
Candidate must be familiar 
wilh a Macintosh, using 
Quark and Photoshop as 
well as Microsoft Office ap- 
plications Sand or deliver 
resume with two professio- 
nal references to Manhattan 
Area Chamber ol Com- 
merce, Attention Oena Kut). 
501 Poynu Ave . Manhat- 
tan. KS 66602 $6 50 hour 
Resume deadline. May 6 



SITE HELP Wanted Coun- 
try Stampede. June 23- 26. 
2005 Pick up application ai 
3003 Anderson. Suite 949 
Plaza Wesl Shopping Cen- 
ter 

STUDENT TECHNOLOGY 
Assistant m Technology 
Sen/ice Center Assist with 
installation and maintenance 
of technology classroom 
equipment Prefer candidate 
with Audio Visual equipment 
and computer experience. 
Hours are l« VOpm Monday 
through Friday 20 hours per 
week dunng semesters, full- 
time during summer and 
breaks, 57 00 hour Contact 
Anthony Phillips al 
(7851532-3341 for further in- 
formation Submit appiica 
lion in room *121 East Sta 
dtum 

SUMMER CAMP FARM IN- 
STRUCTOR needed tor 
Girts Scout overnight camp 
in Colorado southwest of 
Denver Manage small farm 
(horses, burros, chickens 
ducks, goats, llamas, pig, 
•tc i and instruct campers in 
animal care and behavior 
Late May- early August 
Competitive salary, housing, 
meals, health insurance, 
travel and end o I season 
bonuses Apply online a! 
wjMLgir&CQuiBmiteiM.org£ca 

(JtOjBbj or (303)838-531 1 




j EDROOMS 



I*51-Ii56 Anderson 

•cloMiocaropii 

iMKBtotwm 

• <.'1n*p to Agjiicvi lie/campus 
2514 SUgji Hill Rd. 

• washer/dryer in each apt 
1 1 mi. n 1. 1 1 hi 

• large jpl 
1524 McCain 

• fireplace in each api. 

• balconies w/ mosl ipts 
926 Bltittnonl 

• 1 1/2 bathrooms 
1417 -1419 Leavenworth 

• washer/dryer in each ajii 
1700 N. Manhattan 

• all utilities included 
1115 N. 12th 

• washer Aiiycr in each apt 
1001 Bluemont 

• 2 full bathrooms 

• large apt 
700 Fremont 
1 431 -1 433 McCain 

• washer/dryer hookups in each apt. 
500-508 N. 12th 

• newer apts in Aggieville 



S575S6H) 



3 AND 4 

BEDROOMS 



1620 Met sin 

• 2 bathrooms 
I TOO N. Manhattan 

• adjacent to campus 




3101 



H#ip WiintM 

SUMMER MAY help Long 
hours Good $$$ 1 785)587- 
5852 

SUMMER INTERNSHIP 
ALTERNATIVE-MOVER 

Covan World Wide Moving 
is looking for college tlu- 
dents for summer work Ex- 
cellent opportunity to stay in 
town tor summer, slay in 
shape, and save some cash 
or it you need an internship 
alternative or summer em- 
ployment Helpers and 
packers to perform packing 
and loading ol household 
good to our military and 
commercial customers No 
COL required Apply as 
soon as possible at 615 S 
lilti Sheet on Fort Riley 
Blvd Vary competitive $7 50 
10 S9 00 hourly incentive 
wages Job begins immedi 
alely following spring finals 
week through summer 
Equal Opportunity Employ- 



400 



op en 
market 



4101 



Hems for Sale 

S10I POLICE SEIZED prop 
erty TVs. PCs. DVD Play 
ers, and more Irom $10' For 
more information (800)366 
0307 tut M670 

GOVERNMENT SURPLUS 
held gear bouts, camou- 
flage clolhing. much more 1 
Also Carhartt Workwear 
Open Monday- Friday 
9a m - S 30p m Saturday 
9a m - 4fi m Kt Mary's Sur- 
plus Sales, SI Mary's, KS 
(785|437 2734 



Computers 



SUMMER JOBS 

Position) uptti NOW' 

ll.i i ii tinny •Clerical 

Receptioniil 

WbicIhmsc • IVnluuinti 

Key Staffing 

nilS mi (Mm 

Tiakfi.i k.v W*U 
, tit i : h J **p*k 



SUMMER KITCHEN help 
needed Please apply al 
Kite's Bar and Grill. 815 N 
I21h Street In AggievMe 

Summer position Look- 
ing tot a responsibli 
ual lo watch our three OhsV 
dren at our home beginning 
June 1 Monday Friday 
8:30- 5 30 Ages are 4 B 
10 References required 
Please call Kevin al (785) 
584-1607 

THi DOUGLAS County 
Conservation Oislrid is ac- 
cepting applications lor a 
full-time entrylevel Waier 
Suffer coordinator 
The Coordinator implements 
stale waler quality pro- 
grams, promotes establish 
ment ol conservation practi- 
ces and develops education 
programs WJ1 require some 
lime spent outdoors wlin:l> 
may include rough terrain 
Requires background expe- 
rience m conservation or ag- 
riculture College degree 
preferred Beginning pay 
$10. hour Benefits include 
heath insurance, v action 
and sck leave For applica 
lion and complete job de- 
scription call (785)843-4260 
e«1 3 Applications will be 
accepted through May 4 
2O05 



COMPUTERS Rti 
and data saved Vriu- 

spywtib removed In en 
fiance speed and reliability 
Fasl arid reliable service 
Call Lair Gauche ii?3 
Wesltoop, (785)776330? 

NEED A new PC or laptop? 
Bad Credit? No credit? No 
Problem I All we need is a 
valid checking account and 
a cuir I'm utility bill Don! de- 
lay Call iouhv 1866)352- 
t735 I [.-h SladPCS 

45fiMa«B 

Pats and 

Supplies 

MOVING' FREE lour year 
old kilty lo good home De- 
clawed and fund 1620)874 
4329 

500 

t ransportati on 



Automobiles 

$5001 POLICE IMPOUNDS' 
Hondas- Chevies/ Jeeps 
etc Cars/ TruohsV suv s 

from 5500' For listings and 
information call IBO0P66 
0124 exl 7536 

2000 BLUE Fort I cuei 

71,600 miles Great condt- 
Iran $4 6&ii or t«.*sl otter 1 
Please contact Maria at 
■6616 



Business 
Opportunities 

The Collegian cannot veri- 
fy the financial potent lei of 
advertisements in the Em- 
ployment/Career classifi- 
cation. Readers are ad- 
vised to approach any 
such business opportuni- 
ty with reasonable cau- 
tion The Collegian urges 
our readers to contact the 
Better Business Bureau. 
501 SE Jefferson, Topeka. 
KS 66607-1190 (785)232 
0454. 



Fundraisers/ 
Scholarships 

FUNDRAISING OPPORTU- 
NITY: Interested groups 
may contact Country Stam- 
pede al (785)539-2222 



Motorcycles 

198? KAWASAKI KZ305 
LTD Good condition 5000 
miles $650 or best after 
(316)259-2815 

20O3 HONUA 4IM t * 
or best offer 
(785)456-341 a 

NEW RETRO scooter. 49cc 
four- stroke 140 mpg. grey 
and black tree campus 
parking in bike racks. $800 
(785)539-9792 



600 

trav el/ 

trips 




Mi < irtlnii'jli |lm lojililt nl Iih 



210 N. 4th, Suite C • Manhattan. KS 66502 
(785) 776-3804 * mdi-aianhatUn.com 




ims, Mi,iirs& \unvi \ns 



ABOVE AVERAGE t OMPENSATION 

• Discounted Mcah 

• Flexible Schedule 

• Crew Incentive Programs 

• Medical Insurance 

• Retirement Plan 



TOIi.W- WORK TODAY 



421 N. Ird Street 

3006 Anderson Ave. 

EOE/Dnig Fret Work pi ace 






mm 



Distance to Campus 



ONE BEDROOMS 

1022- 1026 Sunset 

M4M 

1212 Thumon 

W7O490 

1950-1960 Hunting 

t460-4ao 
1837 College Height; 
MM 
TWO BEDROOMS 
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Page 10 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Friday, April 29, 200S 



DRUGS | Discount program 
would help Kansas residents, seniors 



Continued from Page 1 

iption drugs from other 
COimtriM because ol lu-uhh 
tiinsjji-ruliitlis 

FDA offitials cannnl j;uuraii- 
|M that the prescriptions have 
been made or packaged proper- 
ly according lo FDA guidelines. 
it inaUncei nfficials fear 
■ ui,i\ ictualhf he buying 
plac stool instead of vital med- 
itation. 

However, these concerns 

may not be applicable to the I- 

\ program. According to 

Nicolt ran, press Mcre- 

01 Sebelius, officials per- 

sonally Investigated pharmacies 

(or this program and the health 

standards practiced by all com' 

p;ii lies within I he network have 

ipproved. 

There are several safety 

gliardl in place In help protect 

:otuunwfm The drugs are never 

removed Iron their original 

packaging, which guards 

against potential tampering. 

Program officials even check 

for drug interactions to protect 



their clients. 

As further evidence of the 
safety of the program, partici- 
pants haven't filed any com- 
plaints concerning adverse side 
effects and no deaths have re- 
sulted from importation 

This is an alternative for 
our Kansas residents and for 
our seniors who are choosing 
between food and medicine," 
Corcoran said "Since congress 
hasn't approved lowering costs 
of medications in the United 
States, this is Sebelius' alterna- 
tive for Kansas residents " 

Former FDA chief David 
Kessler spoke with Congress, 
urging them not to fight impor- 
tation, but to legalize the prac- 
tice and to help ensure compli- 
ance with safety regulations. 

Thus suggesting the power 
pharmaceutical companies 
have over I he government, Cor- 
coran said, not necessarily FDA 
disapproval of importation. 

for more information or to 
enroll in the program visit 
wivzv.l-SaveRx.net or call 
(866)-ISAVE33. 



WABASH | Students perform traditional dance during football games 



Continued from Page 1 

electrical engineering, said the 
Wabash Cannonball brings 
unity to the students of K-State 
"I think the Wabash Can 
nonball is such a big deal at K- 
State because it's very distinc- 
tive," he said, "ft allows fellow 
Wildcats to cheer on our 



team together," 

Krisla Patlon, a sophomore 
in elementary education who 
plays piccolo, said the student 
taction's energy while the band 
plays the song eases the nerves 
of most band members. 

It s a fun song for the band 
members to play, and the stu- 
dents have their dance ac- 



tions," she said. "Everyone gets 
excited It's kind of nerve- 
wracking when being on the 
field, but when you see them 
dancing and having fun, it's a 
1 1 it of fun," 

Tracz said the Wabash 
dance was started by members 
of the clarinet section It went 
from the clarinets lo the entire 



band to the student section 

During the band's perfor* 
mance of the "Wabash CanE 
nonball," students sway back 
and forth, opposite of the peo- 
ple next to them, to form a 
wave- like effect in the stands. S 
"It's a neat sight to look up 
and see the students dancing to 
the Wabash," Trac2 said 



TUITION | Waivers would assist professors with college-aged children 



Continued from Page 1 

assistant professors and spend 
a lot of money training, and 
eventually, they leave for 
more lucrative offers," she 
said. 

The problem is money. 

"The slate-appropriated 
salary increases do not keep 
puce with market increases," 
Spears said. "Market increas- 



es exceed the salary increases 
that the Kansas legislation is 
able to provide." 

While there is no research 
that supports tuition waivers, 
Spears said that they are try- 
ing to establish a competitive 
plan 

"We are simply trying to 
put in a tuition program that 
could compete with what is 
being offered at the other Big 



12 schools," she said. 

Tom Rawson, vice presi- 
dent for administration and fi- 
nance, said the plan has been 
deliberated before, but 
progress is being made. 

"We have had discussions 
in past months, but we are 
taking the time to put it to- 
gether in the form of a pro- 
posal in the next couple of 
weeks," Rawson said 



Rawson said the plan 
would help maintain profes- 
sors 

"It will help us retain our 
faculty. It is a form of a bene- 
fit for faculty that have col- 
lege-age kids," he said. "It's 
for them attending classes ei- 
ther in Manhattan or Salina. 
They can't take the waiver 
and go lo another school; it 
doesn't work that way." 




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4 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 

SPRING GAME 



Friday, April 29,2005 




Finding a lost identity 

Wildcat defense using the spring to re-evaluate, re-establish attitude 



By MkhM< Ashford 
KANUSSMUOtLtflAN 

Maurice Mack is not happy. 

He doesn't like to lose. 

So last year's 4-7 football season did- 
n't sit too well with the junior safety. 

"Nobody associated with Kansas 
State liked that 4-7 record." Mack said. 
■ I can't stand losing football games. I 
dont know who does like losing" 

The Wildcats finished last season 
with a 37-23 home loss to Iowa State, 
and with no bowl game to prepare for, 
Mack immediately started focusing on 
improvement 

"I was sitting at home and thinking 
about stuff, and I laid 'I'm going to do 
whatever it takes to get this team back 



to where it needs to be,'" Mack said. 

For Mack and others, last season 
was particularly tough to swallow be- 
cause they had been through good 
times as Wildcats. They were a part of 
the 2003 Big 12 Championship team 
that played in the Fiesta Bowl, the 
school's first Bowl Championship Se- 
ries game. 

They had also been at K State when 
some of the greatest Wildcat defenses 
roamed the field. 

In 2002, when Mack and linebacker 
Brandon Archer redshirted, the Wild- 
cats finished second in the nation in 
total defense, giving up just 69. 5 rush- 
ing yards per game, a school record. In 
2003, K- State's defense was sixth in the 
nation, only giving up 283. 1 total yards 



of offense per game. 

Not only that, but for the previous 
seven years, the K-State defense ranked 
in the top six in the nation in total de- 
fense - the only school able to make 
that claim 

Then came last year, and the drop- 
off was staggering 

K State gave up 306 points per 
game. The previous nine years, the 
Wildcat defense gave up an average of 
14 7 points per contest 

Opponents rushed for 148.3 and 
passed for 201.4 yards per game, a star- 
tling jump up compared to years past 

""lb me it's an embarrassment, be 
cause I was here when the Lynch Mob 
was the Lynch Mob," Archer said. "I've 
seen it, and unfortunately, I never real 



If you go 

Purple/White Spring Game 



1:10 p.m. Saturday 
Where: KSU Stadium 

Hew mudi: ft lor adults, $2 for K State students 
and youth IS and undet. Ticket Office in flramlage 
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Library program, the K State Leadership Studies 
program and the Anthony Bates Memorial hind. 

ly got a chance to be a part of it. Just 
seeing it, and experiencing last year, 
and actually having an impact on it, I 
would say we did not live up to its 
name" 

The Lynch Mob is the nickname 
Wildcat defensive players gave them- 



selves after the 1995 season. It was 
never meant to offend; instead, it was 
supposed to symbolize the aggressive, 
mob- like nature of the K State defen- 
sive players 

"To me, it's being the best no matter 
what," Mack said. "You might have one 
play or a couple of plays where you 
mess up bad, but the Lynch Mob is all 
about the unit. Eleven guys flying to the 
ball, going 100 percent no matter what 
the down is, no matter what is going on, 
no matter where we're playing or who 
we're playing - we are out there to 
dominate the game" 

Sophomore comerback Byron 
Garvin said the mindset of a K-State 

Sat KFBtK Pits ■ 



Page 2 



SPRING GAME 



Friday, April 29, 2005 



Spring game gives Evridge, Webb 
chance to show their growth 

Meier to sit out annual Purple- White game with injury 



By Michael Ashford 

KANWMUCOUIGIAN 

Allan Evridge has never played a 
down at quarterback for K-State, but 
that hasn't stopped him from thinking 
he can be better. 

"I put a lot of pressure on myself to 
have high goals, and 1 expect a lot out 



of myself,'' Evridge said "I'm making 
progression like 1 want to and getting 
better every day. but not the types of 
leaps and bounds that 1 want." 

Evridge. a redshirt freshman, is 
one of three quarterbacks on the 
K-State roster who the coaches ex- 
pect to compete for the starting job; 
the other two are juniors Allen Webb 




Court My photo 
Shown warming up More th« Kanus g»m* (luring the 20M teason, redihirt freshman Allan f vridge k on* of 
three quarterbadu Mpecied to vie for the starting spot In 200S. 



and Dylan Meier 

Evridge may be the furthest behind 
in the race for the No 1 spot, simply 
because he has never seen the field in 
an actual game, whereas Webb and 
Meier saw extensive time last season. 

However, Evridge's chances of 
closing the gap are increased this 
spring due to the fact that Meier, who 
has been penciled in at No 1, is sit- 
ting out this spring because of an off- 
season shoulder surgery, leaving 
Webb and Evridge to battle. 

Evridge said the increased repeti- 
tions received during the spring can 
mean nothing but good. 

"I guess 1 kind of look at every- 
thing as an opportunity," Evridge said. 
"Any reps I can get will be good reps " 

Coach Bill Snyder said Evridge has 
a lot of room to grow, but he has been 
pleased with how bard Evridge has 
worked to improve. 

"Allan Evridge has been up and 
down; he has his good days and his 
bad days, but the thing I know about 
Allan Evridge is that he's probably 
back in the film room right now 
somewhere watching videotape or 
will be over the course of the day," 
Snyder said. "He just has to have 
more experience in being able to 
translate what he's learned and the 
concepts he has in his mind to the 
field. He hasn't done badly at all." 

Due to his injury, Meier will be 
held from Saturday's Spring Game, 
which means Webb and Evridge will 
receive the majority of the playing 
time. The question then becomes, 
who will lead the first team? 

Snyder said Webb has shown signs 
of distancing himself from Evridge, 
but consistency has not been present 
from either quarterback. 

"There's a little separation there," 
Snyder said "Webb just hasn't done it 
consistently, but I think has made the 
step ahead But then, about every mo- 
ment that you think he's really ready 
to take off, then Allan Evridge closes 
the gap, or they come closer together. 

"Not that it's always Evridge clos- 
ing the gap as much as it is Webb 
sometimes steps back." 

Webb said as he becomes more 
comfortable with the offense, his 
focus has turned to helping the team 
improve on last season's 4-7 record. 

"My goal is the team goal - just to 
get better and do everything Coach 
Snyder tell us to do," Webb said. "I 
want to do everything in my power to 



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Threes company 



The quarterback battle will be one of the more intriguing races to watch this offseason Junior Dylan Meier 

and Allen Webb each played in 10 games lasl season, while freshman Allan Evridge redshirted last season. 

Heading Into the 200$ season, here is a quick glance at what each brings to the quarterback position 




Or 




Or 




Analysis 



Analysis 



Saw action in 10 of 


Saw action In 10 of 


K- Stale's 11 games 

in 2004, passing for 

1,436 yards, nine 

touchdowns and 


1 1 games in 2004, 
passing for S12 

yards, three touch- 
downs and four 


ft* interceptions. 
Ran for 232 y*nJt 
on Slurries and 
stotnicMowns 


interceptions Was 
the team's second 

Iradmg nr.lwf with 
41* yards. 



Analysis 

fedshlrtedinam 
Asatwo-year 

starter at PapMod' 
Lavtsta High School 

in Nebraska, he 
was named to the 

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Uafi Super State 

flrjtwm. 



make progress as far as getting bet- 
ter" 

On Saturday, regardless of where 
each quarterback starts, it will be a 
chance to compete in front of the 
K-State fans in a realistic setting 

Evridge said the Spring Game can 
help each quarterback prepare for the 
fall, when the battle at quarterback is 



sure to continue. 

"It's another chance to hone your 
skills as a quarterback and as a play- 
er, especially since it's a more liye at 
mosphere," Evridge said. "In practice. 
it gets pretty fast, but not quite to the 
extent that you'll have in the Spring 
Game. I think that's the must benefi- 
cial part of the Spring Game " 



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Friday, April 29, 2005 



SPRING GAME 



Page 3 



Replacing a legend 




Chris Hanewlnckel | COUEGIAK 
Junior running tuck Ttionus Qtyton runs iway from thf dffemt during th» 1004 Purple and White Spring Game. Clayton finished fourth on 
the team in rushing In 2004 with 71 yards on 14 tarries Clayton Is expected to help fill the hole left by the graduation of Damn S proles 



Alsup, Clayton, Anders, Fisher prepared 
to prove to fans, coaches they are ready 



By Matthew Girard 

KANSAS HAT! COl LEGIAN 

It's the question K- State has 
been able avoid the past three 
seasons, but it now has to be an- 
swered 

Who will replace the Wildcats' 
all-time career rushing leader and 
the Big 12 Conference's all-time, 
all-purpose yardage leader Dar- 
ren Spmli 

On Saturday, the Wildcats will 
begin their search to fill Sproles' 
void at the annual Purple and 
White Spring Game, with senior 
Carlos Alsup, juniors Thomas 
Clayton and Donnie Anders and 
redshirt freshman Parrish Fisher 
battling for the No. 1 running 
back spot 

Although he understands 
comparisons will be made to the 
departed Sproles. running back 
coach Michael Smith said it's un- 
fair to make that assessment 

"They have their own identity, 
have their own running forms, 
and Darren's lime at Kansas State 
is done," Smith said "The good 



thing about it is that every year 
that I've been here, we had the 
ail-time leading rusher leave, and 
somebody else has come in and 
stepped up and played well for 
us" 

Senior fullback Victor Mann 
said it will be a competitive battle. 
but the team is not looking for an- 
other Sproles. 

"We've got a lot of guys that 
are ready to step in there and 
compete," Mann said. "Darren 
was a great back, and no one will 
be like him, just like he wasn't 
like [osh Scobey when he stepped 
in. 

"Everyone has their own style 
of running, and 1 feel that the four 
guys we have back there are going 
to compete and give it everything 
they've got, and we will have a 
good back there when we start 
the season" 

Despite being limited by in- 
juries and not seeing any action in 
2004, Alsup is currently listed at 
No. 1 on the depth chart, but 

See BACKS Pages 



The replacements 





Carlos Alsup 

Senor- 6-1,2)0 
is anting oil i second 

tons«utwe season endng 
knee surgery in 2004 

Thomas Clayton 
KIM 

Appeared m 10 games in 
)QIH as a luck up rushing for 
71 yards on 14 carries. 

Donnie Anders 

lunwi S '0 US 
IheWHdcatslejdmg rusher 
m the 2004 Spring Game 
with 106 yards. 

Parrish Fisher 

Freshman BS — 5-10. 20J 

fiedshrrtedit20CF4 Iwo- 
year starter at Jlftarte 
High School in leus 



Compiled by Michael Athford 
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KJSHWITT 



When the 2005 KSuu 

Wil«JL:its lake the fifUl l 
day <<«hv 

lor ^ 

the Purple 
ind White 
Spring 
Game, 
the cir 
cum 
stances 
will be very unique 

This will be the first Wild- 
cat team in 12 years to COM 
oil | sub- 500 record and no 
bowl game. 

There is so much to prove; 
so much up in the air 

Who's going to replace 
Darren Sproles? How's that 
Allan Ev ridge guy going tn 
look? Can the defense re- 
bound from a bad 2004 sea 
son? 

Don't get me wrong, the 
Spring Game is basically a gl<i 
rifled practice for the fans, and 
Saturday won't del ermine the 
fate of the fall - but lhal does 
n't mean fans can t lake quite 
I hit away from this weekend 

Here are just a few things 
to watch after you tailgate, 
walk into KSU Stadium half- 
smashed around 1 p.m , and 
sec if the Wildcats are making 
steps toward regaining their 
excellence 

Watch Thomas Clayton and 
Parrish Fisher ease your 
doubts at running back 

Darren Sproles is gone, but 
it's going to be fine at tailback 

(unior Thomas Clayton has 
the makings of a star He's got 
the confident attitude a go-to 



needs, and he's built like a 

ikiht train. 

Coaches are starting to give 
I impression Clayton is 
to turning a comer to 
I licking down the start 
inj; spot. 

I Bad being said, redshiri 
freshman Parrish Fisher could 
be the guy who dazzles fans 
the most on Saturday 1 lave ! 
ever seen him play 7 No But 
Fisher's teammates and run 
ning backs coach Michael 
Smith are very high cmtMl 
guy 

He's small (5-foot- 10), but 
he's strong (205 pounds) and 
very quick according to those 
who have seen him that 
sounds like a guy who used to 
play herp. 

Worry very much about the 
1 1 neb acker situation 

When defensive cookHm 
tot Bob Elliott uses phrase's 

like "strums issues, nn 

mash" and "unreliable" in ref- 
erence tn the liriehackiuti t urt 

and foiM of ill that** 

not a good sign 

Junior Brandon Arch, r 
could become one of the best 

a i the position in the Big 12 

Conference, hui that's II Ap 

parent ly, senior Ted Sims isn'i 
the same guy after an injury 
riddled 2004 season Mars in 
Simmons is still Marvin Sim 
mnns, which is mil good, and 
senior Matt Butler is recover 
ing from offseason surgeries 
On the bright side, you II 
get to see sophomore Marcus 
Perry run wild. If you saw 
Perry on special teams last 



year, you've got to be hoping 
he realizes he's playing his 
own guys on Saturday and 
doesn't decapitate anybody 

The secondary will begin lo 
show why il will be better 
than last year 

I know, that's not saying 
much. Last season, there were 
coverage breakdowns, mi 
tackles and a knack for giving 
up the big play at the WQIfl 
lime t see Colorado game) Bui 
Coach Bill Snyder seems fairly 
pleased with the competition 
at comerbuck and gaiety I ©ok 
out for Kyle Williams, Marcus 
Watts, Byron Garvin and 
Maurice Mack in particular. 

Hope that you walk away 
confident about (he quarter 
back position 

junior Allen Webb has a leg 
hirt-freshtnan Allan 
Evridge, but that only means 
mi much 1 1 is significant who 
plays the best between the 
pah*, but tins spring dues not 

determine the Mailer 
There's still Dylan Meier. 
The junior has been limited 
in spring drills due to injury, 
hut Snyder still talks as if it's 
Meier's spol to lose when fall 
rolls around 

think of i fie quarterback 
battle as a tournament Meier 
has a bye and will play the 
winner of Bvridge and Webb 
in I he finals 



tosh Witt is a senior in print journalism. 
You tin e null htm at 
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Page 4 



SPRING GAME 



Friday, April 29, 2005 



More questions than 
answers at linebacker 



By Anthony Mandoxa 

KANSAS STMKOUtGWH 

On a defense that finished 
1 1th in the Big 12 Conference in 
2004 by allowing SO 6 points per 
game and sixth in total defense, 
no unit stood out more than the 
K State linebackers. 

The only problem was the 
Wildcat linebackers stood out 
more off the field than on it 

"You guys know we have seri- 
ous, serious issues at linebacker," 
defensive coordinator Bob Elliot 
said. "So anybody that has any 
kind of possible credential - we 
moved (Greg! Gastrins - anybody 
that has any prayer at linebacker 
will get a look" 

The Wildcats were hit with nu- 
merous injuries, which forced 
many linebackers to play out of 
their natural spot 

Senior middle linebacker Ted 
Sims was a preseason Butkus 
Award candidate last season, but 
he missed most of the season due 
to injury His replacement, senior 
weak-side linebacker Matt Butier, 
started the Erst five gomes at mid- 
dle linebacker for the injured 
Sims, only to get injured himself 

One of the more intriguing 
linebackers is senior Marvin Sim- 
mons In a three-game span, Sim- 
mons recorded 27 tackles, includ- 
ing a game- high 13 against 
Oklahoma, while playing at mid- 
dle linebacker Simmons played 
in nine games and recorded 55 
tackles, but he missed the open- 
ing game of (he season against 
Western Kentucky for undis- 
closed reasons. 

"He's got one reason or anoth- 



er to gel out of practice" Elliott 
said of the senior transfer from 
Compton College "He's got one 
reason for this, and one reason 
for that Since he's been here, he's 
been unreliable at best" 

While questions linger with 
the other returning linebackers, 
Brandon Archer appears to be the 
closest to a sure thing for the line- 
backers 

"Archer is the one constant 
guy" Elliott said. "Marcus Perry 
nas played with the first team this 
spring. .God love him, he's mak- 
ing all kinds of progress, but he's 
not where he needs to be the rest 
of the team is a mish-mash. Your 
pick." 

Archer had a breakout season 
in 2004, as he led the team with 
75 tackles and had two intercep- 
tions returned for touchdowns on 
his way to being named Associat- 
ed Press Big 12 honorable men- 
tion. 

'To me, he was never off of the 
radar screen," linebacker Matt 
Butler said of Archer. "I always 
knew he was a good player, and 
as soon as he got his opportunity, 
I knew he'd make the most of it 
and play well like he did He got 
better every week, and he is still 
getting better, and he will be bet- 
ter in the fall. He will be a good 
asset to the defense." 

Archer said the rotation last 
season because of all the injuries 
allowed the unit to experience 
each players' style, and now they 
know what to expect at each po- 
sition. 

"The guys that we had last 
year, we rotated and kind of got a 
feel for each other, and I think 




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"You guys know 

we have serious, 

serious issues at 

linebacker." 



Bob Elliott 
WttNSM (OORIMAIOR 



once we get that continuity be- 
tween us, I don't think it will be a 
problem as far as coming togeth- 
er at the linebacker group and 
doing things well," Archer said 
"The starters, the top guys have 
the experience and know what to 
expect It's just a matter of getting 
some of the younger guys up to 
that level so that if something 
does happen, they're ready to do 
it" 

Two of those young players are 
sophomores Greg Gastrins and 
Perry. 

As a red shirt freshman last 
season, Perry finished with four 
tackles but was known for his 
crushing blows on special teams 
Gastrins, a converted defensive 
back, played in nine games as a 
redshirt freshman His only three 
tackles of the season came on 
special teams. 

Archer said both are progress- 
ing and learning the schemes and 
system of the linebackers 

"They're young guys, and 
they're still learning the system, 
and they're picking it up pretty 
good," Archer said- "like I said, 
the talent is there. Both guys are 
very talented. It's just a matter of 
how they put it on the field and 
put it all together" 



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Llndwy Bauman | (OllfCIAN 
Junior linetucke r Brandon Archer goes for the tackle against Colorado's Jot Klopfenstein during Usl year's game. Archer Is K States I 
returning linebacker after he led the Wildcat defense with 75 tackles and was named It Stated defensive MVTlast year. 




Sims 



Analysis 

An Injury limited 
Sims to just seven 
games In 2004, 
with his lone start 
coming against 
Iowa State. 
Compiled 17 
todies — «wn 
solo — and an 
Interception. 




Analysis 

In 2004, Petty 

appeared in nine 
games as a reserve 
linebacker and on 
special teams. He 
was credited with 
four tackles, three 
of which were sols 
slops Known for 
being a big hitter. 




Gastrins 



Analysis 

Gaskins is making 
the transition from 
defensive back to 
linebacker this 
spring. In 2004, 
while playing 
mainly on special 
teams, Gaskins 
made three tackles 
in nine games. 



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Friday, April 29, 2005 



SPRING GAME 



PageS 



Clary emerging as team leader 

Senior tackle also mentoring young offensive line 



ByJo*hWHt 

KAMSASS1HE COLLEGIAN 

After earning a 4-7 record and failing 
to make a bowl game for the first time 
since 1992, the K- State football team 
had some searching to do following the 
2004 season. 

In the winter and into the spring, 

Stlayers and coaches alike were looking 
or leaders - guys who could get in a 
player's face if he was not getting the job 
done, and then back it up by example. 

Heading into Saturday's Purple and 
White Spring Game, that leader ap- 
pears to be (eromey Clary 

"Jeromey Clary has really distin- 
guished himself as a guy that's attempt 
ing to become a hands-on leader, and 
he does so for the right reasons," Coach 
Bill Snyder said. "Because he cares 
about this football team, and he under 
stands the need for interaction and 
leadership within the team itself," 

The senior offensive tackle has a lot 
on his plate this spring. 

Not only is Clary taking on the role 
of team leader, but he is also mentoring 
an offensive line in which he is not only 
the lone starter returning, but also the 
only lineman with significant playing 
experience. 

But those are roles Clary seems to be 
welcoming with open arms, which 
might come as little surprise to fans 
This is, after all, the player who took last 
season's disappointments as hard as 
anybody in the football program. 

"I can't explain huw mad I am, how 
angry 1 am, how regretful 1 am, for some 
of the days I didn't have a good prac- 
tice," said Clary after a 38-31 loss at C'nl- 
orado that sealed the team's fate of fail 
ing to go to a bowl game 

"How regretful that I haven't been 
able to find out what was wrong with 
the team and been able to tum it 
around." 

Clary said he and several other play 
ers on this year's team are doing what- 
ever they can to make sure the 
heartache of last year does not happen 



again. 

'This year is different from last year," 
Clary said. "Last year, everybody kind 
of waited for Darren (Sproles) to come 
around and start talking, but it just 
never happened This year we probably 
have eight or 10 guys that are real vocal 
leaders." 

At b- foot -7, 300 pounds, Clary's 
physical presence alone demands re- 
spect, and this offseason, he won the 
Powercat Strength and Conditioning 
staffs Football Lifter of the Year Award 
and the Paul Coffman Award that is 
based on work ethic. 

When Clary talks, his teammates lis- 
ten - and not just the freshmen and 
sophomores Clary works with on the 
offensive line 

"He's a real vocal guy," senior wide 
receiver Davin Dennis said. "He's the 
type of guy thai when someone does 
something wrong or is not working as 
hard, he'll go up to them and tell them, 
"Yi hi need to pick it up and get it togeth- 
er' and we need that" 

Heading into Saturday's scrimmage, 
Clary's work with the team and the of- 
fensive line continues. 

The team is youngest on the offen- 
sive line. Junior college transfer Michael 
Priesen and Greg Wafford are two ju- 
niors battling (or spots, with Wafford 
slated as the starting right guard on the 
spring depth chart 

Only Wafford has seen time on the 
field for the Wildcats, and that was in 
the Louisiana-Lafayette game last sea- 
son. 

Prom there, it only gets younger 

Rcdshirt freshman Gerard Spexarth. 
sophomore John Hafferty and red shirt 
freshman Ryan Schmidt are the top 
players at left tackle, left guard and cen- 
ter, respectively, on the depth chart 

Hafferty appeared in seven games, 
but after that, playing experience is zero 
for the trio. 

More than halfway through spring 
practice. Clary said the unit was alter 
nating between good and not -so-good 
play. 



"At times, we looked 

horrible. At times, we 

looked like four 

freshmen and a 

senior, but at other 

times I think we've 

looked like five 

seniors playing as a 

whole unit." 



JwomtyOary 
OffFHStVETACKlE 



"At times, we looked horrible " Clary 
said. "At times, we looked like four 
freshmen and a senior, but at other 
times I think we've looked like five se- 
niors playing as a whole unit Some 
scrimmages we're clicking on all cylin- 
ders, running real well." 

Offensive coordinator Del Miller 
said the young line still has a way to go. 

"We've had some growth on our of- 
fensive line, and yet they still need the 
rest of the spring, plus the summer, plus 
the fall, to get the kind of experience 
they need," Miller said. 

"Where we're at right now, I think 
we might be headed where we were last 
year, which isn't saying much at 4-7" 

But rest assured. Clary is doing all he 
can to make sure the offensive line - 
and the team - does not repeat last sea- 
son 

"Jeromey always has led by exam- 
ple" Miller said. "He's got an extremely 
good work ethic A leader also has to 
verbalize that as well. You can't just 
lead by example; that's not entirely 
leadership, and he will - he'll step for- 
ward. 

"And because of what he's done by 
example, they'll listen. 

"He's been around, he's been in the 
pits. They don't look to him and say, 
You're not doing it,' because he is." 




I ft**y photo 
Senior right t*Ue Jeromey Clary is the lone returning senior on the Wildcat offensive tine. Clary has made 1 
uttve rtarts, started all 1 1 names last season, and was named second team AIJ-Btq t 2 by the league to^hf, in .'9<M 



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Page 6 



SPRING GAME 



Friday, April 29, 2005 



K-State 1st team defense 



Key losses 



DL lermame Berry 

DE Kevin Huntley 

DB BretiJonc, 

DB David Rose 

LB Maunce Thurmond 

DB (edrid Williams 



2nd team defense 



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Steven Cline 
Alphonso Moran or 
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Ian Campbell 
James Graber 
Marvin Simmon; 
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Fast facts 

Coach Bill Snyder 

■ Entering 1 7th season as head coach 
alK-State 

■ Career records: 131-62-1 overall; 
73-47-1 in league play 

■ Five-time Conference Coach of the 
Tear (Big 12 and Big 8) 

■ Three time National Coach of the 
Year (1991, 94, 98) 




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K- State 1st team offense 



Key losses 

TE Brian Casey 
OL Jon Doty 
OL Mike Johnson 
RB Darren Sproles 
OL Michael Weiner 
Malcolm Wooldridge 




2nd team offense 



WR IS 
U 77 
IG 7S 
C S1 
RG 67 
RT 65 
Tt 41 
OB 12 
RB 21 
FB 36 
WR 27 



Davtn Dennis 
Michael Frieson 
Matt Boss 
Jacob Voegeli 
Greg Wafford m> 
Logan Robinson 
UFinan 
Allan Evrtdge 
Carlos Alsup 
AyoSaba 
Jordy Nelson 



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2005 football schedule 

OPPONENT 

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Friday, April 29, 2005 



SPRING GAME 



Page7 



Nelson making switch to wide 
receiver during spring practice 

Converted defensive back earns repeated praise 




By Josh Witt 

KANSAS SJMECOUt&AN 

Coming into this spring, the 
Wildcat wide receivers were 
touted as the most experienced 
unit on the team, as senior 
Davin Dennis and juniors Jer- 
maine Morcira and Yamon Fig- 
ure ail started last year 

But guess which receiver is 
making the most noise heading 
into Saturday's Purple and 
White Spring Game? 

It's a sophomore walk-on 
from Riley County High 
School. And get this - the guy 
is actually a defensive back 

E^^ turned wide re 
I ueiver. 
Meet 
I Nelson 
*? Coach 
I Snyder 
Honed 
H son's 
1 several 
during 
spring 
player 
stood out. 
"I think he made a lot of 
progress, and as soon as 1 men- 
tioned his name, he started to 
level off" Snyder said halfway 
through spring practice. "That's 
the jeopardy you probably put 
him in when you speak so high- 
ly of him. Considering where 
be began with not having any 
experience on the offense, he 
has made ample progress." 

The attention is all new for 
Nelson, who redshirtcd in 2003 
before not seeing any playing 
time as a member of the squad 
during K-State's 4-7 season in 
2004. 

"It's a different feeling," Nel 
son said. "You feel more a part 
of the team Of course every- 
one here is a part of il, but you 
get more involved, you look 
forward to practice and you're 



Nelson 

wiw mum 



Jordy 

Bill 
men- 

Nel- 

name 

times 

the 

as a 

who 



able to contribute to the whole 
program." 

At 6-foot-3, 210 pounds. 
Nelson is a pure athlete. In 
high school, he was an all -state 
basketball player and won 3A 
state track tides in the 100, 
200, 400 and long jump in 
2003. 

And then there was football, 
where Nelson was second-team 
all-state in all divisions at quar- 
terback and defensive back. 

Offensive coordinator Del 
Miller said Nelson's athleticism 
is visible every day on the prac- 
tice field. 

"He's a big receiver that can 
run," Miller said. "He's got 
great speed and has shown the 
ability to go up in a crowd and 
make the catch. You match him 
with somebody like Yamon Fig- 
ure now and a couple of the 
other guys, and you have a 
group of wide receivers with 
pretty good speed, jordy is 
probably best on that side of 
the ball." 

Snyder said it was time for a 
change this past offseason. 

"Il just looked like he was 
floundering a little bit where he 
was," Snyder said. "He's a good 
athlete; he can run, and he's 
got good size and range to him. 
That (moving a player to a bet- 
ter position) would be true with 
any young guy that we have. If 
it's not working some place, 
maybe he'll fit some place else." 

Prom all accounts, there's 
no "floundering" now. 

Nelson said he is working 
with Dennis, Morcira and Fig- 
ure on the first learn in four 
wide- receiver sets and said he 
recognizes the group he's play- 
ing with has a load of talent. 

"I'm just trying to fill some 
spots and do what i can do to 
help contribute to this group as 
a whole," Nelson said 

Dennis said Nelson is doing 



"He's a big 

receiver that can 

run. He's got great 

speed and has 
shown the ability 

to go up in a 

crowd and make 

the catch." 

EM Miller 
OFFENSIVE COOflOINATOR 



just that 

"We're pretty competitive," 
Dennis said. "We've got a cou- 
ple of new guys coming along 
like lardy, and he's coming 
along pretty good He's making 
plays and making progress and 
doing pretty good." 

Nelson has a little bit of his- 
tory on his side, as he tries to 
make his mark on the team. 

Another Riley County High 
School graduate, Ion McGraw, 
began his career at K-State as a 
walk-on wide receiver, and he 
finished as a 19-game starter at 
free safety McGraw was a sec- 
ond-round draft pick of the 
New York Jets in 2002 and has 
been with the )ets ever since. 

"Everyone knew about |un 
McGraw and everyone wanted 
to follow in those footsteps," 
Nelson said "It gives you the 
idea that if he can do it there's 
always a great opportunity that 
anyone else can. You just got to 
go out there every day and give 
it your all," 

Nelson, a lifelong Wildcat 
fan who grew up 15 minutes 
from KSU Stadium, said he 
hopes he can continue to im- 
press 

"I guess (the coaches) like 
what they see," he said. "So I'll 
just keep doing it" 




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Street Talk 

After last year's 4-7 season, will the K-State football team 
be better or worse in 2005? 





"Wan? losing little ||^~ "^H 


"Better because rt 




Sprriesy, so that j^ rW ■ 


coukJ not be worse 




definitely will hurl S^fc^l 


ttwn it was this 




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worse because I 
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going to suck 
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they will start to 
ItOHOf 



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classmen; 
underclassmen are 
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Aihky 
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SINtOMMKK 
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*Ho-jefulry better, 
but I don't know. I 
don't even know 
who is playing.' 

Heather Orth 

JUNIOR. H0TIUW5TAU 
RANI MMMUjtMEM 



*l hope next year 
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PageS 



SPRING GAME 



Friday, April 29, 2005 



BACKS I 4 vying for No. 1 spot 



Continued front Page 1 

there is no clear front runner (or 
the Wildcats' top running back 
pnsinon During last season's 
spring game, the 6-foot-l, 210- 
pound Liberal, Kan., native 
rushed for 53 yards on 1 3 carries 

Alsup said his experience in 
Coach Bill Snyder's offense will 
benefit him this spring 

"I have been here awhile, and 
I know the program," Alsup said. 
"I have enough knowledge of 
what there is to do Competing 
with Thomas (Clayton) is going to 
be a great thing (or me" 

Smith said Alsup is the type of 
running back the Wildcats need 

"Carlos has his own style," 
Smith said "He's just a work- 
horse, and that's the kind of guy 
we're looking for." 

Wildcat fans caught a glimpse 
of Clayton during the 2004 regu- 
lar season, as he appeared in 10 
games for K- State 

The 6- foot, 210-pound back 
was fourth on the (cam in rushing 
with 71 yards on 15 carries, and 
his 4.7 yards per carry was second 
only to Sproles 

"He pretty much reminds me 
of Josh Scobey" Smith said. "|osh 
left here as the K- State leading 
rusher, and 1 think Thomas Clay- 
ton has the ability to be a tremen- 
dous running back for us." 

Clayton said he is ready to 
prove to the fans and coaches he 
belongs in the starting lineup. 



"Since I've been here, I've 
waited for that," Clayton said 
"Since I've been in college, I've 
waited for that opportunity This 
(spring) is going to be big" 

Anders, a 5-foot- 10, 185 
pound Salina native, was the 
2004 Spring Game's leading 
rusher, with 106 yards rushing on 
nine carries and a 56-yard touch- 
down run 

Anders appeared in three 
games in 2004 and registered six 
yards on three carries 

The newest addition to the 
running back mix is Fisher, who 
redshhted last year. 

In his senior season at J.J 
Pearce High School in Richard- 
son, Texas, Fisher rushed for 
1 .914 yards and caught 19 passes 
for 145 yards and one touchdown 

"He's got a long way to go and 
a lot of room to improve, but at 
this point in his career, he's prob- 
ably as far along as any freshman 
IVe had since I've been coaching 
running backs," Smith said. 

Clayton said the Spring Game 
will showcase everyone's talent, 
and he is looking forward to the 
competition 

"I think they all have different 
things that they bring to the 
table," Clayton said "Coach (Sny- 
der) made it clear that he wants 
us to compete for the spot We are 
all going to compete, and the best 
will gel the position." 

Competition is an awesome 
thing" 



DEFENSE | Wildcats searching for new defensive identity, attitude 



Continued from Page 1 

defender is that of a warrior. 

"To fight," Garvin said "To 
do whatever it takes Fight, 
scream, scratch - whatever it 
takes to handle your business 
on the field" 

Turn to this spring, where 
much of the focus has been on 
whether the 

K-State defense can regain the 
once -proud form of a few years 
ago 

The K-State players agree 
on one thing - the problem 
last year was not a lack of tal- 
ent 

"Leadership," said Kyle 
Williams, a junior corner/back 
who rt'dshirted last year "We 
just didn't have anybody step 
up and try to be a vocal leader" 

"It just seems like there 
were questions but no an- 
swers," senior linebaacker Matt 
Bulicr said. 

"The talent was there, 
everybody that played was 
there, but I think we did some 
things that got us away from 
our fundamentals and basics," 
Mack said 

It has been a spring of 
change for the K-State football 
team. 

The team members woke up 



at 5:30 a.m. to work out and 
run during the out-of-season 
conditioning program. Now, in 
the month-long period of prac- 
tices leading up to Saturday's 
Purple and White Spring 
Game, the players said they 
have experienced a difference 
in the way the program is run. 

Archer said he has noticed 
the change from the top down. 

"The whole program feels 
they can do something better, 
so you definitely see it in the 
coaches," he said. "There are 
times when they are more in- 
tense; there are times where 
you can tell their style or the 
way they handle certain things 
has changed " 

The spring has also been a 
period of reevaluation for the 
defense 

"We had a discussion earlier 
about whether or not we 
should even call ourselves the 
Lynch Mob," Archer said. 

At the start of spring prac- 
tices, defensive coordinator 
Bob Elliott, other defensive 
coaches and the players met to 
discuss the future and what 
was in store for the Wildcat de- 
fense 

The result of the meeting? 

"We're in the stage of iden- 
tifying ourselves and trying to 



figure out something new for 
us," Archer said. "We really 
have to redefine what the 
Lynch Mob is and what our de- 
fense is right now" 

Mack said he has since 
turned to former players to 
gain insight on what it meant 
to play defense for K-State. 

"I've heard from guys like 
Chris Johnson, Terry Pierce 
and Josh Buhl, who 1 got a 
chance to talk to, and they all 
told me, 'the defenses we were 
associated with, we were in- 
timidating. Our defense was in- 
timidating because we were so 
physical, we always ran to the 
ball,'" Mack said. "If that's 
what it takes to get us back to 
being the Lynch Mob, we're 
going to do it." 

After Saturday's game, the 
K-State players will begin their 
summer workouts, with many 
staying over the summer to 
work toward the goal of be- 
coming a better football team 
next season while using last 
season as a reminder of what 
could happen 

"We're better than the team 
we were last year," Butler said 
"All that happened, and we're 
ready to get into the fall and 
starting talking about this year 
instead of last year" 



"We're in the 
stage of identi- 
fying and trying 

to figure out 
something new 
for us. We really 
have to redefine 
what the Lynch 
Mob is and what 
our defense is 
right now." 

Brandon Archef 
[INfBKKER 



Head Coach Bill Snyder 
said the lessons learned from 
last season may prove to be the 
best teacher for his players as 
they head into the fall 

"The greatest strength is 
what happened last fall, and 
that may be the greatest weak 
ncss as well," Snyder said. "It 
lingers because we were all a 
part of it. But by the same 
token, if that's motivation, that 
would be a great strength 

"Motivation is a great 
strength in any competitive en- 
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Sub Exp Dale 
Kansas State Historical Societ 
Newspaper Section 
PO Bon 3585 Q 

Ik TopekaKS 66601 ** 

K- State offense, defense 
tested during Spring Game 
scrimmage 

Sports, Pag* 6 





www. kstatecol legian com 



* Monday, Mav 2, 2(H)5 



Vol 109. No 154 



Walking for hope 




Students, community members brave 
the cold, walk for a cure for cancer 



By Krltten Roderick 

KANSAS SlATEtQUKIAN 

When John Nord 
strom was 10 years old, 
his mother died i»f breast 
cancer This year's Relay 
for Life gave him a 
chance to honor her with 
one of the many lumi- 
naries surrounding the 
track at Memorial Stadi- 
um on Friday and Satur 
day The event raised 
Dion than $12,000 

i he highlight for me 
was the candlelight cere- 
mony," Nordstrom, 
freshman in agriculture 
economics, said, "It was 
pretty touching when 



they read my mom's 
name aloud " 

Willi a message nf 
hope lit by luminaries in 
the Mauds. Nordstrom 
and other K-Slate stu 
dents braved the euld to 
benefit (he American 
Cancer Society to re- 
member those who died 
from cancer and those 
who are still battling the 
disease. 

"When they read all 
of the names for the peo 
pk in hOQOf and menu j 
ry of, it was really mov- 
ing and touching,' Kelly 
Huerter, sophomore in 
marketing, said "W> ill 
gathered in a group and 



it was pretty calm I was 
just thinking how cancer 
has affected so many 
people. Pretty much 
everyone has had 
son affected." 

Although the event 
was supposed to last 
until b am , it ended at 
4 30 am because of the 
weather 

it was freezing,' 
Nordstrom said "As the 
night went on, less and 
eople were playing 
catch and walking 
around the track Most 
people eventually stayed 
in their tents" To keep 

SeefiELAYPagelO 




Chris Hanewlnckel | (UllEUAN 
TOP: Students walk wound the Memorial Stadium track late Friday flight at a 
pan of the annual Relay (or life. The event started at 6 p.m. and continued until 
430 a.m. Teams collected donations weeds before the walk. All proceeds went 
to the American Cancer Society. 

A10VE: Members of the Pre Vet Club team play Monopoly on the infield of 
Memorial Stadium. Teams found a variety of ways to stay busy during the 1 J 



106 students receive white coats in ceremony 



By Jess* Manning 

KANSAS StAUMUt&IAN 

Roger Fingland was honest with 
the 106 students participating in the 
College of Veterinary Medicine's 



Fifth -annual White Coat ceremony 

White coats are not always prac- 
tical for veterinarians," he said 

With laughter and applause, the 
audience agreed with Fingland, di- 
rector of the veterinary medicine 




Undiey Bauman | COUKIAN 
Arm ludunan, third year uttertwy medtdne student receives her con during the white coal 
ceremony for the Ctttf* •NftMtary Median* at the K State Student Union Friday. 



teaching hospital However, each vet 
med student in the class of 2006 was 
later presented with j white doctor I 
coat for its symbolism rather than its 
practicality 

After three years of learning facts 
in the classroom, incoming seniors 
in veterinary medicine are ready to 
begin their final and most challeng- 
ing year, Fingland said The white 
coat is meant to celebrate and honor 
their achievements so far, as well as 
symbolize the responsibility, empa- 
thy and compassion that will be es 
sential to their profession 

Lester Crawford, commissioner 
of the Food and Drug Administra- 
tion, spoke to the students, family 
members and friends in attendance 
about what the final year of veteri- 
nary medicine has in store. 

"This year you're about to em- 
bark on was the most important in 
my life," he said. 

Crawford, who is the highest 
ranking veterinarian in public ser- 
vice, said that in their final year in 
college, all classroom experience 
would come together to be practical 



and applicable 

Crawford also lauded students for 
choosing ,ne veterinary profession 

"Nothing can be more intellectu- 
ally stimulating," he said "You will 
always be challenged'' Crawford 
said that veterinary medicine is the 
most earing profession, and that 
even 50 years from now, many in the 
class of 2006 will still be working as 
vets and "doing the right thing for 
the world" 

The 106 students in the class of 
2006 were each then presented with 
a personalized white doctor's coat. 
Afterward, they all faced the rest of 
the attendees in the K State Student 
Union Ballroom and took an oath 
pledging responsibility, professional 
ism and compassion 

Dan Thomson, assistant profes 
sor of clinical sciences, said that 
during their fourth year, students 
wilt be gaining practical clinical ex- 
perience, either working with local 
practices or taking referral cases 
from around the country 

See WHITE (OAT Page 10 



Hale Library 

quiet zones 

in effect 



By Adam Hanks 

MANVAS'iIAIKOIIEGIAN 

All of Hale Library, with the exceptions of 
the second floor and the 24 hour study area, 
will be designated as "Quiet Zones" for dead 
week and finals week 

Students seeking a near- noiseless environ- 
ment to prepare for their final exams should 
try to stick to the first, third and fourth floors, 
Sara Kearns, the Instruction coordinator for 
KSU Libraries, said, although absolute silence 
is impossible. 

"We will still be doing business at our refer- 
ence desks, so if they want absolute quiet they 
will probably want to go someplace away from 
the desks." she said 

Also, custodial and maintenance staff wilt 
still be working throughout the building, 
which may disturb students studying, Laurel 
Littrell, the interim assistant dean for KSU Li- 
braries, said. 

"That's a big problem, she said 'Facilities 
is in charge of the custodians, hul we arc going 
in ask people to do the noisy stuff as early as 
possible and just try to be sensitive in the quiet 
zone" 

Kearns said she recommended the Great 
Room on the third flour, the entire fourth floor 
and most areas of the firsl floor, since these 
•TOM HI isolated and far from desks 

Students who wish to study in the quiet 
zones should turn off cell phones, keep their 
voices to a level that can only be heard from 
about a fool away and should tum down their 

See HAU Page 10 



Panel discusses 

diversity in 

media outlets 



By Christina Hansen 

KANSAS SIAHCOUEGIAH 

Leaders from the newspaper, radio, tele- 
vision and magazine industries gathered to- 
gether Friday in the Union Little Theatre to 
discuss diversity in the media 

The media diversity panel was sponsored 
by Mass Communicators of Many Cultures 
and theTilford-Dow Scholars 

Each panel member was asked to briefly 
explain an issue that he or she felt affected 
diversity 

The discussion that followed concerned 
many different media fields and focused on 
a wide variety of issues. 

Tom Grimes, associate professor of jour- 
nalism and a former reporter lor CBS and 
NBC said network pressure to increase 
profits leaves many newsmakers unable to 
focus on diversity 

"Most people doing TV news are ob- 
sessed with drawing viewers and finding in- 
teresting content," he said. "There is unre- 
lenting pressure In make a product that 
draws and entertains viewers " 

Keener Tippin II, research, news and fea- 
tures coordinator for K State Media Rela- 
tions, discussed the importance of employee 
diversity in the news industry 

"Lack of diversity in newsrooms often 
presents a one-sided view of the news, 
whether actual or perceived," he said. 

Andrew Latham, program director of 
KSDB-FM 919, said his staff often associ- 
ates the word diversity" with fear. 

"They're scared that if we can't cover it 
adequately, that we'll gel in trouble," Latham 
said 

Umut Newbury, associate editor of Moth- 
er Earth News magazine, said that diversity 
is also an issue in international news cover- 



age 



The United States focuses more on 
See MEDIA Page ID 



Today 



Co 

T 



High 60 
Low 34 



High 66 
low 40 



NEWS HIGHLIGHTS 



North Korea missiles 

North Korea test fited a short range 
missile that plunged into the Sea of 
Japan Sunday, the White House chief 
of staff uld. adding he wasn't 
"surprised by this "The US. military 
told the Japanese government of the 
suspected missile 



Pope makes appearance 

Pope Benedict XVI on Sunday made the 
first window appearance of Ms papacy, 
saying he was keeping up the poputat 
tradition of his "beloved" predecessoi, 
)ohn Paul It, who last appeared to 
crowds from his window in silent 
suffering. Tens of thousands of people 
gathered In St. Peters Square 



Sunday liquor sales 

More than two years after a court ruling 
allowed local governments to defy state 
law's long-standing ban on Sunday 
liquor sales, lawmakers passed a bill to 
remove the prohibition from the books. 
The bill preserves the right of cities and 
counties to allow liquor stores to open 
on Sunday, except faster and Christmas. 



DON'T FORGET 



Today <s the list (toy for 

graduate students to 
confirm their May 
cornrnencetrierrt atten- 
dance. 

A topk research datu is 
frornlOJOftllJOan. 

today m Hale 408. 



A bask ttnry irtsiruc 
tionaJ class is from 130 to 
I is p.m today In Hale 

m 



present the Landon Lecture 
at 9:30 am Tuesday In 

Mctaln Audttoourfi 




I 



Page 2 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Monday, May 2, 2005 




Puzzles | Eugene Sheffer 



ACROSS 
1 Hoi tub 

4 — Mahal 
7 Prima 
donna 
11 Kite flier's 
need 

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Toms 
Cabin" 
girl 

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Sharif 

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phone 
range 

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appella- 
tion 

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18 Nut -bear- 
ing tree 

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dinner 
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bracer 

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onion 

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34-Krwv-" 

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charges 

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rov's 
team 



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bigwig 
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mom's 

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Solution lime 



60 Soklier 
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crall 
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IN RETROSPECT 

WEEK IN REVIEW: 7 THINGS YOU DIDN'T KNOW 7 DAYS AGO 

Bush goes on primetimeTV 




The A undated Presj 

The morning after iddmunq the nation in » telfvlwrJ speech From the {ait Room of the White House, President George W. 
Bush was owe again on the offensive, diwutsing his proposed Social Security plan to a group of invited guests at the John 
lee Community tenter In Falls Church, Va, 



Staff and wire reports 

President Bush went vocal during one 
of his few prime-lime appearances Thurs- 
day night, focusing on the Social Security 
plan that faces opposition from both the 
Democratic and Republican parties Bush 
introduced a new proposal that would re- 
duce benefits as more workers' incomes 
rise. It was the first lime Bush backed a 
plan that would reduce benefits for mil 
lions of Americans 

BRIDE-TO-BE FOUND 
Instead of wearing a wedding dress in 
front of 600 guests, lennifer Wilbatiks 
spent her wedding day admitting to a 
story she made up about being abducted 
from her Georgia home days earlier Ear 
tier in the week, Wilbanks went missing 
after going for an evening run Apparent- 
ly, the future bride left due to pre -wedding 
jitters, leaving hundreds - including her 
fiance and wedding party - to search for 
her 

FORMER NEBRASKA COACH RUNS 
FOR GOVERNOR 

Former Nebraska football coach Tom Os- 
borne had so much 
success as a Congress- 
man that the 68-year- 
old has plans to run 
for the slate's Republi- 
can nomination for 
governor, Osborne, 
who retired as one of 
the University of Ne- 
braska's all-time great- 
est coaches at the end 
of the 1997 season, re- 
ceived more than 82 percent of the vote 
during his past three runs for Congress. 




Osborne 



ENGLAND PLEADS GUILTY 

Pfc Lynndie England, the woman ac- 
cused of abusing Iraqi detainees in Abu 
Ghraib prison, announced she will plead 
guilty to the charges, almost one year after 
photos were published of her sexually hu- 
miliating the inmates. On Monday, the 
22-year-old Army reservist will face the 
military court, where she'll plead guilty to 
seven of the nine counts against her. 

BOY KILLS FATHER 

A 10-year-old Humboldt, Kan., boy was 
charged with first-degree murder Wednes- 
day in the shotgun killing of his father 
Town officials still don't know why the 
boy killed his father on Sunday, while 
four other children and the boy's mother 
were inside the home. 

MEDIA ORDERS OPEN RECORDS 

Six media organizations are demanding 
the release of sealed documents in the 
BTK case On Wednesday, Wichita news 
media, in addition to the Associated Press 
and Kansas Press Association, wrote a 
motion to open sealed documents related 
to the state's case against BTK suspect 
Dennis Rad it, in addition to allowing any 
further requests for sealed documents to 
be heard in open court 

PACKERS OR BEHIND BARS 

An Applelon, Wis., woman convicted of 
felony theft was given the choice to either 
spend 90 days in jail for the crime or do- 
nate her family's Green Bay Packers foot 
ball tickets to the Make-a-Wish founda- 
tion for one year. Sharon E Rosenthal, 
who was convicted of taking more than 
$3,000 from the labor union where she 
worked, decided to give up the tickets, in 
addition to paying back the union. 



The blotter 

Arrests in Riley County 

Reports are taken directly from Riley County Police 
Department's daily logs. The Collegian does not list wheel 
locks oi minor traffic violations because of space 
constraints. 

Thursday, April 28 

■ At 1:57 p m , Jennie Davis, 1200 Windqaie Circle, 
basement apartment, was arrested for worthless (heck .. 
Bond was set at $20976. 

■ At J:3I p m , Cornel (vans, 1312 Yuma St., was arrested 
for child abuse Bond was set at $$,000 

■ At 5 p.m., Julie Kenfield. Leonardville, Kan., was arrested 
for driving on a suspended license Bond was set at $$00. 

■ At 8 p.m.. Michael Burkdoll, 3137 Lundm Drive, No 4, 
was arrested for DUI Bond was set at $7$0 

■ At 10:30 p.m , Austin Ploof, 1 306 N Manhattan Ave., 
was arrested for probation violation Bond was set at 
$1,500 

■ At 11:15 p.m„ Ambet Williams, 730 Allen Road, No. 29, 
was arrested for sexual exploitation and endangering a 
child. Bond was set at $2,000. 

Friday, April 29 

■ At 1:17 a.m., Bobbi lynch, 505 Haymaker Hall, was 
arrested for DUI. Bond was set at $750. 

■ At 3:36 a.m., lason Pulls, Tooeka, was arrested for DUI. 
Bond was set at $750 



The planner 

Campus bulletin board 

Campus Calendar is the Collegian's campus bulletin board 
service Items in the calendar can be published up to three 
times Items might not appear because of space constraints 
but are guaranteed to appear on the day of the activity To 
place an item in the Campus Calendar, slop by Kedzie 116 
and fill out a form or e-mail the news editor at 
bulletimu'ipuhkwedu by 1 1 am two days before it is to 
run. 

■ All 2005 graduates (May, August and December) ate 
invited to the Senior Send-off from A to 6 p.m Thursday 
at the Aiumni Center North Terrace 

■ The Graduate School announces the final oral defense 
of the doctoral dissertation of Gustavo Seabia at 3 p.m 
today in Hale 114. 



Corrections and clarifications 

There was an error in Friday's Collegian. Kmart's sale price 
for 24 double exposure Film is $4 69 and 36 double 
exposure is $6.69. The sale price for 36 single exposure is 
$5.36. the Collegian regrets the ermr. 



Kansas State Collegian 

(USPS 291 020) The Kansas State Collegian, a student 
newspaper at Kansas State University, is published by 
Student Publications Inc , Kedzie 103, Manhattan, KS 
66506 The Collegian is published weekdays during the 
school year and on Wednesdays during the summer 
Periodical postage is paid at Manhattan, KS 66502. 
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Kansas State 
Collegian, circulation desk. Kedjie 103, Manhattan, KS 
66506-7167 

O Kansas State Collegian, 2005 



«'\ ¥ 1H1__ /"ll !■■■■ MM 




LARGK 



* nil rnrmtiM 
Cm wv Hut ii»K 



DAY, 

EVERYDAY! 



FRUSTRATED ABOUT 

WRAPPING UP YOUR 

FINAL PROJECTS.' 



Let thfli* help! 

We can tieip you put thote 

'loaning touches on your 

project* wth services such OS 

3 binding options • lamination 

•cotor copies •covers 

' printing from disk 



- 776-3771 




r 



Parking 

Lot Construction 



Parking Lot construction will occur In lot C-2 
north of the Recreation Complex, starting In May. 

This lot, encompassing all parking between 

Denlson Ave. on the east and the traffic circle on 

the West, will require alternate entry and parking 

over the course of the summer 

Please watch for more notices, check wilh the 

staff at Porklng Services or the Recreation Center 

and follow signs and directions. 

We appreciate your patience during this period. 



Campaign tor Nonovioience 

wTHANK YOU n 

Auntie Mae's Tar [or 

and 

Barefoot Rebellion 

You Raised S580 For Community Nonviolente Work! 



Jbh The Haymakers 

For Ploying Bluegross of the 2005 
CKV Community Nonviolence Wolk! 



496 pages... 

200 student organizations... 

more than 5,000 faces... 

supplemental DVD... 

the 2005 Royal Purple yearbook... 

available in Kedzie 103 

8 a.m. - 5 p.m. 

remarkable. 

www.royalpurple.ksu.edu 




Brian Williams 

News Anchor 
NBC Nightly News 

Tuesday, 

May 3, 2005 

9:30 a.m. 

McCain Auditorium 



Monday, May 2, 2005 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 3 



NBC anchor to give lecture 




Brian Williams 

Managing editor and anchor of "NBC 
Nightly News with Brian Williams" 



9:30 a.m. Tuesday 



Williams 



McLiin Auditorium 

Mm 

Brian Williams succeeded lorn Broltaw in 
Decembet 2004 as the seventh anchor and 
managing editor of "NBC Nightly News. Williams 
served as NBC's thief White House correspondent 
fiom 1994to 1996 and again until December 
2004, when he took over the Nightly News 
position. 



Why you should go 

Williams has covered most major news events In 
the world since he joined NBC News in 1993. 
Recent events include the 2004 presidential! 
elections and the Asian tsunami and earthquake 
disasters 

A little about Brian Williams 

Williams attended George Washington University 
and the Catholic University of Amenta in 
Washington, DC. He began his broadcasting career 
in Pittsburg, Han., followed by stints at 
Philadelphia, Washington, DC and New York 
stations. 

from 1994 to 19%, Williams took ovet as 
NBC's chief White House correspondent, covering 
most of President Clinton's travel. From 1996 to 
January 2004, Williams was anchor and managing 
editor of "The News with Brian Williams" on 
MSNBC and CNBC. 



4th presentation ends series 



By Joanna Rubick 

KANSAS MATE (OIK&IAN 

The last presentation i>! the 
Lewis arid Clark Lecture Series 
bj tonight 

Carla Wambach, member of 
Montana's Lewis and Clark Bi- 
centennial Educational Com 
mittee, will present "Take 
Flight with Lewis and Clark" at 
7 tonight at the Manhattan 
Public Library, 629 Poyntz Ave. 

It is the fourth in the Mriei 
The series is pari of Celebrate 
150!, the year-long celebration 



of Manhattan and Riley Coun- 
ty's 150th birthday 

Riley County Historical So- 
ciety and Museum and Man- 
hattan Public Library are spon- 
sors for the event. 

Cheryl Collins, director of 
the Riley County Historic;! I 
Museum and Society, said it 
will be more than just a lecture. 

"She's going bring some 
hands-on objects," Collins said 

The objects, such as a bird 
mount, were significant in 
Lewis and Clark's journey 

Collins said the rest of May 



If you go 

Lewis and Clark lecture 

When: 7 p.m. 

Where: Manhattan Public library, 629 

Poyntz Ave 



and June will nut have any 
more 150 lectures They will 
begin again in |uly, she said, 
and continue monthly until the 
end of the year. 

When or what we don't 
know right now, though," she 
said 



kstatecollegian.com 



GET IN HERE! 



532-6560 




reserved just for 



KANSAS Si ATE COUEGUN 



ADVERTISING 



IIHnlne 532-6560 




Pq rid no ^ 3C " ^ 



Sf Clff Applications 



We are sending out the 2006-2006 Faculty /Staff Parking Permit 

applications via e-mail, You should receive an e-mail that will allow 

you to fill out your form and then print and return It to Parking 

Services, An actual signature is mandatory 

If you do not receive this e-mail, please look at our web site, 

ksu.edu/parking. and under forms, fill out the 2005-2006 Faculty/Staff 

Parking Permit application. After you sign the form, please return 

via campus mall to Parking Services. 

You may use your new permit as soon as you receive it. Please 
destroy your old permit after displaying your new one. 

Your permits will be sent to your campus address after July 1 , 2005. If 

you have returned the application 2 weeks or more ahead of July 

31, 2005, you will receive your new permit before you present permit 

has expired. If you have any questions, please contact 

Parking Services at 532-7275. 












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Studios, 1, 2, 3, I 
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Planet Sub sees good start 



By Adriann* DeW**t« 

KANSAS StAtE COUHMk 

Since its opening on April 
8, Planet Sub in Aggieville 
has been successful 

Planet Sub is a submarine 
sandwich store that got its 
starl in 1979 with Yello Sub in 
Lawrence 

Michael Schmidt, general 
manager of Planet Sub, said 
business has been good 

"We had the best opening 
in Planet Sub history due to 
K- State's student population." 
he said. 

Other sandwich restau- 
rants in Manhattan have re- 
ported no change in business 
since Planet Sub's arrival 

Mike Wisner, manager of 
Quizno's Subs, said Quizno's 
business has not been affect- 
ed, and Bob Tacketl, manager 
of Schlotzsky's Deli, said 
Schlotzsky's has seen no de- 
cline in sales 

"We have to compete with 
every restaurant in town, not 
just Planet Sub," Tackett said 
I believe the quality of our 
product is the best of the 
sandwich businesses in the 
area.' he said 

Cheryl Sieben, director of 
Aggieville Business Associa- 
tion, said Planet Sub has had 
a positive effect on Aggieville 
by bringing in more traffic in 
to the business district. 

"We're happy to have the 
new business in Aggieville," 




Cat On* Rftwson | till l [WAN 
Amanda Crumnne. wphomor* in accounting, rrulM t iub wndwith at Plan* t Sub on April 
29 (rumnne Iw bwn sorting at Planet Sub sine* it opened 



Sieben said 

Schmidt said he is content 
with the location of the new 
store 

"We appreciate the Man- 



hattan community coning in 

and being patnms lu their 
local Planet Sub.' Schmidt 
said 



$14 millon in payroll every month. 

Are you advertising on pay day? 



K\\sl^lUl(M.ICli\ 



liniKIMU, 



532-6560 



ucrutt 

Read the Collegian 




\THWKiQU 

EVENTS 

fo wOURlK-STATElSTUDENtiUNION 

Monday Night Specials 

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Tuesday & Wednesday 



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OPINION 



Page 4 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Monday, May 2, 2005 



TO THE POINT 

Professors 

should use dead 

week properly 



: Dead week, a week intended to let 
Students relax and prepare for upcoming 
finals, has become more of a hassle. 

This week, profes- 
sors should focus their 
attention on preparing 
their students for finals 
and doing less impor- 
tant tasks. 

However, when 
Students have the 
chance to take a final 
in advance, it can 
either be beneficial or 
a disadvantage to 
students, based on 
their own schedules. 
The one sure thing 
that is always a proven disadvantage to 
students is having additional homework 
during dead week. 

Instructors should think back to how 
stressed they were before finals and 
share those sentiments with their current 
students While grueling work during the 
class period might be necessary and even 
helpful, homework is never appreciated 
during the one week each semester that 
is meant to be slow for students. 

Term papers or semester- long projects 
should have due dates that are redirected 
to at least the week before dead week. 
This would be helpful to students not 
only because we are all known to 
procrastinate, but because dead week is 
the week students should be stressed out 
about finals, not about what they have to 
do the week before they take finals. 

Thus, to our beloved classroom 
instructors, please respect our need to 
have a relaxed week or a week to stress 
ourselves out studying for your wicked 
finals and hold off on the homework. 



To the point is an 

editorial selected and 
debated by the editorial 
board and written after a 
majority opinion is 
formed This is the CoMe 
guns official opinion 

Abbie Adams 
Michael Ashford 
Johanna Barnes 
Ryan C. Flynn 
Matt Girard 
James Hurta 
KriStlHurl* 
Jesse Manning 
Sarah Rice 
Joanna Rublch 
Leann Sulien 
Bill Wall 
Lonl Woolery 



WRITE TO US 

Ihe Collegian welcomes your letters to the editor, they can be 
Submitted by e-mail to Jefttn#jpw6.fau.erfu, or in person to 
Jedrie 1 16 Please Include your full name, year in school and 
"Tmajor Letters should be limited to 250 words All submitted 
letters may be edited for length and clarity 



KANSAS STAIE 

., COLLEGIAN 





Sarah We* 






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Kite! Hurt* 

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CONTACT US 

Mma» State CeJtefiM Oassmedads. 532-655S 

XcdriCTOl Newwoom SU4SS6 

ManrWRM, KS 64S02 ntws&pub. Ibu.edu 

! Dtsptayads 532-6560 OeHwry problems SJMSM 



Dork subculture 



Girlfriends have to deal with addicted 
boyfriends, their need for video games 



Boy Friend 
HP: 100 
MP: 19 



iy sctri rum. nt s 
the ,_ 



My boyfriend is a dork. 

Von ve probably wen him; he's 
(hat guy sitting in the 
back of your classroom 
wearing a fuzzy 
bathrobe and mis 
matched shoes Sen 
ously. turn 
around - he's 
back there. JACIBOVDSTQK 

Despite the 
fact that I'm continually amazed by 
the extent of his dorkiness, he's kind 
of a cool dork, and I'd like him to 
continue being my boyfriend 

Because of this, I've sacrificed 
much of my own coolness to hc cli- 
mate myself to the dork subculture. 
In time. I've CORN to tolerale and 
sometimes even enjoy dorky staples 
like online comic strips, anime and 
Adult Swim 

I'm lying. I still can't tolerate 
anime. 

By far, the hardest thing to gel 
used to was the hours upon hours 
spent using a chunk of plastic and 
some cords to make a little guy on 
TV fight with other little guys on TV. 
For most people lacking a Y chromo- 
some, everything about video games 
is confusing, from the plot line to the 
controllers to why it was necessary to 
skip all classes the day "Halo 2" 
came out. 

Because dorky boys will not soon 
put down the controllers, and be- 
cause- just like hell- the world of 
Video games has many levels, here's a 
taste of what you're in for if the love 
of your life is an Xbox-aholic. 

LEVEL ONE: 16-BIT BUSS 

If your boyfriend's video game ad 
diction is confined to a Super Nm 
tendo, count yourself a lucky 
woman Games like "Donkey Kong" 
and "Super Mario World" are typi- 
cally no more complicated than run 
ning, jumping and eating bananas 
Even my mom can handle these 
games 

Some games, like "Super Smash 
Brothers," take the spirit of these 
primitive offerings and adapt it to an 
advanced gaining system Even 
though it's almost entirely combat, 
"Smash Brothers" isn't too hard to 
understand If all else fails, do what I 
do - keep hitting the B button until 
your thumb cramps 

LEVEL TWO: ROLE PLAYING 

These can be hit or-miss If the 
game has a stupid plotline (and, to be 
fair, most do), be prepared for hours 
of boredom and high levels of irrita- 
tion when your boyfriend shows 



Girl Friend 
HP: 678 
MP: 89 
SP:54 




more affection for the 
game characters than for 
you. 

However, if you find 
a good game, watch out 
l-juirc weekends can 
disappear in a game-in- 
duced stupor. When 1 
got my boyfriend 
"Fable," I became so 
engrossed in its in- 
tricate plotline (my 
character could 
barter, go fishing, 
gel married and kill 
wasps with an iron 
katana) that the only 
task 1 accomplished for an entire 
week was finding the 20 silver keys 
necessary to obtain the Murren 
Greathanimer 

When I finally found it, I wept 
with joy And then 1 slapped myself 

LEVEL THREE: FIRST-PERSON 
SHOOTERS 

Girls who can understand and 
even enjoy "Halo' shouldn't be read 
ing this article - they should be de- 
ciding between the thousands of guys 
fighting over the opportunity to date 
(hem. 

For the other girls. I have no ad- 
vice. "Halo" is stupid, and you'll be- 
come stupider if you try to under- 



stand it If your boyfriend can't live 
without three hours of "Halo" a 
night, all is not lost - that's three 
hours a night you have to study, hang 
out with friends or possibly find a 
new boyfriend 

LEVEL FOUR: THE AGONY OF 
MMORPGS (MASSIVE MULTI- 
PLAYER ONLINE ROLE PLAYING 
GAMES) 

In these games, dorky boys pay a 
monthly fee to play very compln 
online games with people around the 
world These are bad news, If a boy 



Hlurtratloni by Jordan Miiall | < DUE-WAN 



ever breaks plans to attend an online 
meeting with other gamers, this is le- 
gitimate grounds for breaking up (f 
he refers li> this engagement as a 
'guild meet ing, 1 ' it's definitely time to 
break up Immediately. 



ltd Boyditon tomehow found ttmt to write ttm 

fHaafa^MI IWrihfakthlHI *AriWhBl Tt* rajaaajhrtr jjaaJsa4 haw 

ranOf MMIfM to pfMfTHf Jt WW* pvttfflf 

ItoHfohu: Tn* lower of Pwq-itory on pause, 
Pfetoc itnd four comments to 
opinion* ywb,kitt, edu 



Nation needs to reflect on lost principles, lack of responsibility 




JON A S HOGG 



We as a nation stand at a 
precipice; we have lost our identity 

We used to be a na- 
tion of people who 
would forsake every- 
thing for a chance at a 
better life. Now we are 
a nation that 
would rather 
lose a leg than 
walk up a flight 
of stairs. 

We used to be a nation of people 
who were told by our mothers and 
fathers to do the right thing, even 
when it was unpopular, nasty and 
difficult Now we are a nation that 
wants to believe there is no "right or 
wrong," or if there is, such a thing 
isn't our responsibility 

We used to be a nation of men 
with principles - principles that were 
worth fighting for, killing for and 
even dying for Now we are a nation 
that thinks principles are something 
outmoded and archaic 

We used to be a nation that val- 
ued hard work, self-made men and 
those who contributed to society. 
Now we are a nation where the self- 
made businessman is ignored in 
favor of the sports star who con- 
tributes to society by getting in fights 
and abusing steroids. 



We used to be a nation of Individ 
u a lists who didn't care one way or 
the other what people thought about 
us Now we are worried that coun- 
tries that support violent oppression 
of women, minorities, free speech 
and religion might not like i is 

Even worse, "individualist" has 
turned into an insult hurled at those 
who don't fil into some planned 
niche 

We complain about our oil prices. 
which are the lowest in the world So 
instead of exploring our own oi) re 
serves, we must ask die murderous, 
wretched, terrorist-enabling Saudi 
regime to increase oil production We 
have abandoned our principles for 
cheap gas, and now every lime we fill 
Up, we must imagine our rtmney 
being used to kill Americans abroad. 

We have at our disposal the best 
medical system in the world. Not one 
of the best, not a pretty good one - 
the best Yet we are outraged that we 
actually have to pay for it. Never 
mind the fact that the vast majority 
of the world's population will live 
lives bereft of any sort of medical 
care. 

We have become a society so bent 
around being "politically correct" 
that we have allowed the minority to 
override the majority We crucify 



anyone who dares suggest that public- 
schools in a predominately English- 
speaking nation should speak Eng- 
lish only 

When graduates of foreign-lan- 
guage- only institutions hit a brick 
will of advancement after graduating 
high school and turn to the only op- 
tions left to them - often low-paying 
jobs or criminal activity - we look 
for every possible explanation but the 
most obvious one 

We have become so obsessed with 
the "lightness" of our side of the po- 
litical spectrum that, at best, we 
refuse to hear any criticism of it and, 
at worse, ignore the blatant corrup- 
tion swarming all over Washington. 
When top Republican Tom DeLay 
and top Democrat Barbara Boxer 
have both been accused of siphoning 
off six-figure sums of tax-pay- 
ers' money to "gift" their rela 
rives and campaign workers, 
it is obvious that something 
has to be done io rein in 
our supposed "public ser- 
vants" 

volves a blindfold, a Vy ^La^lL^^. 

drum roll, a tree and a 
bit of rope, but such things 
are considered uncouth in 
this day and age. 



We, as u nation, need to deter- 
mine where we are going We 
shouldn't be proud lo participate in a 
nation of wishy-washy pansies We 
have wandered away from our prin- 
ciples and it is time to find our way 
back 



JonairtoMHritniiqrecaMtothfAnsyai 
June. Raafy ft* tint*. AMoMaty HO ssrant hi 
«m-HctaN<Hrt*4appcab.kM<ita9<Mdbp 
while ywi haw the tint* Pleas* sand yaw 
cDmnwnh to ot*MHi<npubJau.tdu. 




AM£PICA.' 



CAMPUS FOURUM | 395-4444 -or fourum@spub.ksu.edu 



;^nqnjrir«xBcalMns^tem TbfFourumis 
; edstid to einsnase wdgat, raoa. obscene 
r and totals comments, the cornmenis ve 
'. «trjyrj|i»»laftrfit»<jjV^ not » they your spot in EM 
endorsed by the 



My friend siudud with a guy from 

Man^rrunHtqti Awkward? A Met*. 



WwSKlHfd 



Do « a fwor and take a couple ml of! the 
price of the parking oarage by mating It look 
Mr* a parting oarage and not a mafl 



I by the etttonal staff 



\x*mm*yXmamstn 



Hey, fart k* rjht red For* wtm CaWomta 
plates: you drive ftrcoa 

WttfMftgtt mad, we get em 



1* the famtsswho wrote thtartkV about 
Sryrat*ftenewlceoeam)oWiniown:rn 
sddtton to Musing the tbne and what 
mey ten*, you might want to induoe the 
totation of the reflauant next time. 



Owsyt^irtitw* real shady ladta. than Ptesident flush? 



To the idtet guy tn front of me in my 
physio test the reason they leH you to turn 
c4youtpho»BsoloWtha«torrairitD 
tJwlowhanerybeepatlrKW.lflUtMs 
sat, im (aning after you 

H R bad tthst rm m a mom fuJ of#* 
people, and we'd al rather watch The Of 



rirawaas^aitheursvefstTytotnot 
buying better toUet paper for me to steal 

Derby Mains; 'cause we donl wanna be 
kkr Kramer 

MOT TFtm ink Wh MRf JUSt CiRftJ 

the Jaytawte the Nurfts. How "bout that? 



Ts the gsri art the softball game: sorry 1 
gave you the finger Maybe we could malrett 
up owr a porterhouse at me Strxtade 



IOwAm 

fsrlhtM 



t 



Monday, May 2, 2005 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 5 



People, pets 

participate in 

10th annual race 




Walking for a cause 



Lindsay Bauman | C011EGMN 
Participants in the K State College af Veterinary Medicine's 10th Annlwnary Dog N Jog 
leave the starting gate and head south on Dentson Avenue Saturday morning Rates 
included » 10K Road Race, SK Road Race and 1.5 K Family Fun Run. 



Dog-N-Jog raises $3,000 



By Adrfannt D«W«*s» 

KANSAS SWf{0lt£GIAN 

Dogs dressed in red-hooded 
sweatshirts, jogging shorts and 
other running apparel ran with 
their owners Saturday in the 
10th annual Dog-N-Jog. 

Lindsey Crumly-Blevins, 
event coordinator, said 252 
people competed in the 10K, 
>K and I 5K races 

Crumly-Blevins said ap- 
proximately $3,000 was raised 
from the event, and about one- 
third will be donated to Kansas 
Specialty Dog Service Inc. 

KSDS is a non-profit orga- 
nization that provides dogs to 
the visually impaired and phys- 
ically disabled at no cost 

The rest of the money raised 
will go toward covering gradu- 
ation costs for the Class of 
2006 of the College of Veteri- 
nary Medicine 

Chris Marion, third-year 
Veterinary medicine student, 
won the 5K race and placed 
second in the 10K It was his 
third Dog- N lug -with Spot, a 
Nikila-Chuw nn 

Spot also won the 5K race 
and placed -en mil in the 10K 
for oop 



Marion said he gains a 
stronger human-animal bond 
by participating in the race 

"The race is fun for Spot be 
cause he gets to socialize and 
he enjoys it," he said. 

Kami Lindenmuth. WiBMjgO 
resident, ran the 5K race wilh 
her dog C.J., a part -Pekinese, 
pan-Chihuahua mix. 

"The race is a good opportu- 
nity to see other dog lovers and 
their dogs together," Linden 
muth said 

Trisha Hamblin, senior in 
animal science, participated in 
her first race with nine-month- 
old iMinba, u yellow labrador 

Hamblin said she ran in the 
1.5K Fun Run to give Simba 
exercise and for enjoyment. 

Awards were given at the 
end of the races in categories 
such as smallest dog, biggest 
dog, youngest dog. oldest dog 
and youngest and oldest run 
ners. 

The youngest participant 
was five years old. and the old- 
est participant was 91 years 
old 

Crumly-Blevins said the 
event ran smoothly 

'Everybody enjoyed them- 
selves at the races," she said 




Catrlna Riwson | (OUEUAN 
Peggy Choate and Devon taper, both from Council Grove, Kan., participate in the Multiple Sclerosis Walk Saturday morning. Choate and her family walked to support her husband, 
Junior, who has multiple sclerosis. 



Flight team places 



By Lcann Sulzcn 

KMtSmWE COUfGlAN 

The K-State-Saiina flight 
team took 18th place in the 
57th annual Safely and Flight 
Evaluation Conference. 

More than 400 competitors 
from 24 schools cnmpeled in 
the four-day competition host- 
ed by K-State-Salina 

Pat Rinearson, captain of 
the flight team, said this was 
an improvement compared to 
last years results, especially 
with the team's inexperience. 

"We had a vem vming team 
this year," he said "Only three 
have been U> national compe- 
tition before and we have sev- 
eral that have never been to 



competition before. 

"For them to do thai well is 
realty great for us as a team " 

The K-State-Salina flight 
team also received the Wally 
Funk Competition 
Award, Rinearson said 

"That is given out to a team 
every year who demonstrates 
safety in competition," he said 

Now thai the competition 
is over, the team is looking 
forward to the next year, 
Rinearson Mid 

"We are going to review 
our results from rcgumals in 
Central Missouri State in War- 
rensburg, Mo., next fall." he 
said. "We are going to try to 
specialize m events and re- 
view SOU!', i if this jp 




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f4c * ffrttr AM&& 

SWAtfttjfti/tft't*- fHmfottf 

/ } rttti/f fHtta'tf en frfyttftuy *wV 

x 

\ [ruper s 

{ nthevi 

I* K-&tat<° Umon Lower Level, 
532-5972 



e Empty Bowls says, 
"Thank you, Manhattan!" 



You h*tp*d rais* over $3000 to tu 



the Empty Bowls Event was to overwhelming we raft 
out of soup 1 So., those of you who bought bowls but 
did not get soup, phase com* bock to have your 



/Java 

-sday May 5*h from 5- 8pm 



What's Empty Bowls? 

It iv o notorial movement to help 
the hungry and nuitufe itie o 
was bi ought to our community by 
me K-State Women's Center, 
Campaign (or Nonviolence/ 
ACTON, the KSU Ait Depa'" 
& Potter's Guild wilfi much help 
from Mercado Gtocery, Blue stem 
Biitio, Manhattan High School & 
the Manhattan Arts Centei AH 
bowls were handmade locally and 
donated All pioceeds go to the 
flieadbojkel, Second Helping A 
La Cocina Alegie 

Join us next year! 

Uiank you to Nicole Copet for putting it 

together and to all community participants! 

www.kiu.edu/womenKenler/empty bowls _project.htm 




To gel the 2006 Empty Bowls 
start, the Women's Cenlei is 
providing a $50 scholarship to 
each elemental y school to send 
a student to ihe Manhattan Ails 
Cental's cloy program (his 
summei, in luin these student* 
will contribute then first bawl to 
next year's Empty Bowls 



Mt HOUR MASSAGt 

iW Si «l/ 

W ■/ KSU Stu*«t ID , ]■ 

^ oODYFIKST ™ 

rjoe Aiwiw Aye (71.) ItT-iJOO 



PIZZA 
SHUTTLE 

DELIVERS. 



IKOflClaflinRoad 



776-5577 

Thtfres 
■f the be 

2£ 



"The freshest pivfi 
at the bestpneef" 




ural Graduate Celebration 



Wednesday, May 4, 2005 

from 6 to 8 p.m. 

Tadtman Board Room 

located on the second floor 

of the 

K-State Alumni Center. 



Please make your reservations by noon, Tuesday, May 3, 

to Carol Bredesen at 532-5070. 

You and one guest will be admitted at no charge. 

Additional guests will be admitted for $5 per guest. 

If you have additional questions, 

please call Brandon Clark at 512-5060 




\tl tll^l til I I ♦ m I til * l ) 11* lll\ll I. 



SEND-OFF 



I hupsdcuj, Mai) 5, 4-6 p.m. 

r\-Olale Alumni Vvenier ncrfn terrace 

An li im n \ nit i \w ir \\ | n m hi ilii n il t | .m. 



lass ttss wsssasi 

H A MBURGERS, DRINKS (must b«> present »o win) 

AN D CALL HALL KAtate clan rinq. ftAtatf 

ICE CREAM (I -,., A f .) p^j UJ wafcU. Ukc.ll 

l|( I . K. I ii:ii in i iliuil hi 

UTSHUSIS WA-K-M! 

CLAlfCL'MBIE. 
NASHVILLE, TENN rREEORAOfATIOS nin HIR 

ALL ATTEND!! 5 



STATE ^f^^surt r> b> 



^PEPSt 



( .nitons? Call 53J-6J6C- 

or visil www,r>Otfile.fnin. 



2005 KANSAS STATE 



FOOTBALL I 



September 3 
eptember 24 

CTOBER 8 

October 22 
October 29 
november 19 



VS. FLORIDA INT'L 

vs. North Texas 
vs. Kansas 
vs. Texas A&M 
vs. Colorado 
vs. Missouri 



Be Proud. Be Purple. GO STATE! 






GETTHEMONKATS! 



mmmmtmmmmam 



MMMg^^ptss^MB 



HSMMM 



^■M 



SPORTS 



Page 6 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Monday, May 2, 2005 



BASEBALL 



Wildcats lose series 2-1 to rival Jayhawks 



By Michael A jMord 

KANSAS STATE Cffl IE OAN 

LAWRENCE - The celeb™ 
tinti might have started loo early 
for K-Stale 

The Wildcats went into a 
weekend series with rival Kansas 
winners of seven of their last 
eight games and sitting at eighth 
in the Big 12 Conference 

After losing two of three games 
to the | jy hawks (29-21, 6-11} - 
including Sun day" s rV4 loss - the 
Wildcats (23-20, 7-14) now face 
an uphill battle to climb back into 
contention in the race for the Big 



12 Tournament. 

The loss, coupled with Texas 
A&M's 3 1 win over Oklahoma 
Stale, dropped the Wildcats to 

last in the Big 12 Conference 
standings, and only the lop eight 
teams are eligible 

"I probably gave the WTOnf 
pre game speech today and start 
ad talking about things that were 
ahead of us coming down tin 
home stretch," coach Brad Hill 
said after Sunday's loss "To me, 
we really played pressed and 
played like we had to win, and 
we weren't the same team we 
had been for two weeks 



"That was my faull for think 
mg they could handle that a little 
bit better at this point in time in 
the season" 

Senior Terry Blunt, however, 
said the players were to blame 

"It definitely wasn't the 
DOadfi fault, " he said. "I think we 
might have got caught up looking 
in the standings a little bit." 

On Sunday, the Wildcats 
scored in the first inning, as a 
fielder's choice by Steve Murphy 
•cored Hlunt from third to give K- 
Slalethe 1-0 lead 

Blunt scored again when he 
led off the top of the third inning 



with a blast over the center field 
wall to stretch the K-Stale lead to 
2-0 

The Jayhawks quickly an- 
swered in the bottom of the third. 
With Morrison on first, A J. Van 
Slyke's hit to left Held bounced 
oil the glove of Blunt and went 
over the wall for a home run 

"I should have gone back to 
ihe wall before I looked for the 
ball, but I was floating with the 
ball and I had a "wall call" so I 
jumped when I thought 1 was 
right at the wall when really I 
probably had a couple extra feel," 
Blunt said 



"It just hit off my glove and 
went nut 

White Kansas was busy scor- 
ing single runs in the fifth and 
eighth innings, the Wildcat of- 
fense went into hiding after the 
third inning, as they were held 
scoreless in six innings. 

In the top of the ninth, senior 
|osh Deni broke the drought with 
a two- run shot over the left -cen- 
ter wall to make it 6-4 but that 
was as close as K-State would gel, 
as the next three batters were re- 
tired in order to end the game 

K-State starter Adam Cowart 
(6-3) picked up Eli e loss. 



Defense 

rebounds 

quickly 



By Matthew Girard 

KANSAS STATE COUEGIAN 

It wasn't the defensive start 
Coach Bill Snyder might have 
been looking for at the annual 
Purple-White Spring Game, bul 
it didn't take long for the de- 
fense to rebound on Saturday 

On the No 1 -offense's first 
play from scrimmage against 
K Slate's No 1 defense, junior 
quarterback Allen Webb darted 
between would-be lacklers for 
a 41 -yard run. 

The very next play, junior 
defensive back Kyle Williams 
redeemed the defense by forc- 
ing a fumble from junior run 
ning back Thomas Clayton 

"I think we played with 
greater consistency defensive- 
ly," Snyder said. 

"I thought we had some 
guys that stepped up and really 
made some plays'' 

Senior defensive lineman 
Derek Marso fed all Wildcats 
with nine total tackles, with ju- 
nior linebacker and co-captain 
Brandon Archer adding seven 
total tackles and junior safety- 
turned-liru'backer Maurice 
Mack tallying six total tackles 
for the Purple squad. 

Archer said this year's de- 
fense will be improved from the 
one that gave up an average of 
30.6 points per game a year 
ago 

"I think we're a better de- 
fense right now than we were 
last year at this point," Archer 
said 

"We're not where we want 
to be, but I think we are on the 
up" 

Reds hi it freshman defensive 
lineman Jordan Bedore said 
"hello" in a big way by stepping 
in front of a Webb pass and 
rumbling 29 yards the other 
way for the White team 

"I liked the big play that 
Bedore had," Snyder said, "He 
probably hasn't touched the 
football in the 15 practices 
other than the interception" 

Along with his interception, 
the 6-foot- 3, 275-pound Good- 
land, Kan., native registered six 
tackles and had 1 5 sacks 

Sophomore linebacker Greg 
Gaskins also heard his name 
called several times during the 
Spring Game, as he registered 
eight tackles 

Archer said he has seen 
much growth from the defense 
through spring practice and the 
Spring Game 

"I think we developed as a 
team." Archer said, 



toOffBtSMrtplO 



FOOTBALL 



Little excitement 




By Josh Witt 

KAMSASSTATECOUEOIAN 

Fans hoping fur big, cm 
plays from the K-State Wildcat 
offense at Saturday's Annua) 
Purple and White Spring 
Game probably walked away 
from KSU Stadium a little dis- 
appointed. 

There just were not many in 
the scrimmage that pitted the 
Wildcats' No. 1 offense 
(White) against the No. 1 de- 
fense (Purple) 

"They get more and more 
boring, don't they?" Coach Bill 
Snyder said following the 
game. "1 don'l know how you 
guys walch that stuff." 

The game did drag at times. 
but there were a few moments 
in the White team's 26-3 win 
that pleased Snyder and the 
10,563 in attendance. 

With junior quarterback 
Dylan Meter stuck on the side- 
line due to an injury that limit- 
ed him in spring drills, fellow 
junior Allen Webb threw for 
Ewo touchdowns and ran for 
one more Webb had 113 yards 
rushing and 105 yards passing 

The White team offense was 
slow to get going, as its first 
touchdown did not come until 
the 4:21 mark of the second 
quarter on a Webb one-yard 
touchdown run After a score- 
less third quarter. Webb found 
more of a rhythm in the fourth. 



throwing touchdown strikes to 
senior fullback Ayo Saba and 
junior wide receiver Jermaine 
Moreira. 

"Allen Webb showed he can 
move around and do a lot of 
things," Snyder said "He's a 
very athletic young guy He 
played the second half better 
lhan he played the first. 

As you can see, he's skilled 
enough where he can hurt you 
when he brings the ball down, 
and he obviously did some of 
Ehat today" 

Webb was forced to use his 
feel on many occasions behind 
K-Stale's young offensive line 
that only returns one starter 
from last season's team - se- 
nior right tackle Jeromey Clary 

"When protection breaks 
down or the defense gets in, 
then you got to do what you 
got to do Eo try to create a 
play," Webb said. 

Redshirt freshman Allan 
Evridge - the other Wildcat 
competing to challenge Meier 
for the starting spot in the fall 
- struggled Saturday 

Evridge was 6-of-20 for 45 
yards in leading the Purple 
team's offense. Although sever- 
al of his incomplete passes 
were dropped passes, Evridge 
did throw three interceptions. 

"There were some good 
things and some bad," Evridge 
said, "It was kind of frustrating 
in certain situations " 




ABCM.K States JotaMctafeUgJbre* up i pro ^^ 
^.xrfhjit^ttw^MSKSUttFoortullSftrtnqtinwjtlGUSudlum 
Lindsay Baumin | C0LI WAN 

TOP: Mm Wtftb throws* pan daring tht Dm tulf of the annual spring own** KSU Stadium. 
CM* HanavrincM | COLlEuAk 



While Webb might have dis- 
tanced himself even further 
Bron Evridge, the running back 
battle appears as muddled as 
ever. 

Senior Carlos Alsup rushed 



for 77 yards on 20 carries for 
both the Purple and White 

auads, while junior Thomas 
ayton had 87 rushing yards 

SteGAMfPaatlo 



ROWING 



Varsity team disappointed in last place finish at Big 12 Invitational 



•yi 

IMBASSWICWiBMI 

K State i Pirn Vanity 8 row 
in$ learn finished the weekend in 
^appointing teahjem on Satur- 
day, M it Onaihed last in the B ig 
12 Invtui 

eaflLHwc finished In 6 



44.8 seconds, while 
Texas won the event with a time 
of 6 26 3 

The Wildcats' Firsl Novice 8 
team was the onry team not to 
finish behind the other two 
schools K-State placed secund 
after finishing with i lime of 
7 02 4, almost 20 secur> 



front of the Jayhawks The First 
Novice 8 squad consists of 
coxswain Melissa Cessna, Mau- 
reen McKieman, Erin Martin, 
BaUcy Bunck, Seantella Cottrur, 
Kelsey Fracwr. Jennifer Reuss, 
Brvthe Weir and JolwnWiiaon 

Head Coach Patrick Sweeney 
said the Wildcats" tunc 



fatter than expected, but the 
tram stiD struggled 

We were pretty pleased with 
the efforts by the Novice 8 and 
Vanity 4 today;' Sweeney said 
"Overall, the tunes were fast, but 
we were not expecting the cold 
weather conditions to create 
such a tsifwtnd We struggled 



technique -wise against the cur- 
rent and the Varsity 8 caught a 
crab 500 meters into their race, 
while the JV 8 raced a little con- 
servative, 

"We have one more event this 
season to see if we can race at the 
level we an capable of perform- 
tag at" 



1 -MINUTE 
DRILL 

Staff Reports 

MBB | K-State signs 2 in 
2005 recruiting class 

On f nday, K State head coach Jim 
Wooldridge announced that the 
Wildcats signed two new players — 
Akeem Weight and Darren (Cent — for 
next season, and that forward Dramane 
Diana will return to the team next year. 

Wright, a 6-fooi-6, 190-pound 
shooting guard, will be a transfer from 
Neosho County (Kan ) Community 
College and averaged 1 1 6 points and 
68 rebounds per game as a sophomore. 

Kent, a 6-foot- 10, 210-pound 
forward/center from Apple Valley, 
Minn., averaged 1 3.5 points, 8 S 
rebounds and 2 blocks per game this 
past season. 

Wright and Kent |oin junior 
college guard David Hoskins and high 
schoolers Ousmane Gsse and Sid hi 
Stdibe in K- State's recruiting class 

Diana will return to the team after 
sitting out all of the 2004 OS season 
with a foot injury He averaged 1.2 
points and 1.2 rebounds in 16 games as 
a junior during the 2003 04 season. 

NFL 1 6 former Wildcats join 
professional teams 

As of Friday, four former Wildcats 
had signed free-agent contracts with 
NFL teams, and two more had been 
invited to rookie mini-camps. 

Left tackle Jon Doty (Carolina 
Panthers), wide receiver Tony Madison 
(Miami Dolphins), placekkker Joe 
Rheem (Buffalo Bills) and (ednck 
Williams (Houston lexans) all inked 
contracts as free-ageols with their 
respective teams 

Also, defensive tackle Andrew 
Bui man and center Mike Johnson were 
invited to try out with the Cincinnati 
Bengals and the Kansas City Chiefs, 
respectively, at each team's mini-camps 



The Associated Press 

MLB | Royals win second 
consecutive over Indians 

CLEVELAND — Jose Lima didn't 
get his no- hitler, but Mike Sweeney 
continued his success at Jacobs field. 

Lima took a no-hit bid into the 
sixth inning 
before Cleveland 
rallied, and 
Sweeney hit his 
second homer of 
the game to 
break a tie in the 
eighth, leading 
the Kansas City 
Royals to a 6-5 
win over the 
Indians on 
Sunday 

Sweeney hit a 1-2 pitch from 
Rafael Bmncourt (1-1) Into the left 
held bleachers to break a S all lie and 
help the Royals win consecutive games 
for the first time since Sept 1?- 18 in 
Cleveland. The win was Kansas City's 
third In IS games overall. 

MLB | Olerud signs minor 
league deal with Red Sox 

ARLINGTON, Texas — Veteran first 
baseman John Olerud signed a minor 
league contract with the Boston Red 
Sox on Sunday. 

Olerud, who has played more than 
1 S major league seasons, had been 
recovering from surgery in November to 
repair torn ligaments in his left foot He 
was hurt during Game ) of the AL 
championship series while playing for 
the New York Yankees against tht Red 
Sox 

A two time All-Star 11993, 2001), 
Olerud is a .295 career hitter with 248 
home runs and 1,199 RBIs In 2, 1 47 
games. 

AUTO | Gordon wins again 
at Talladega, Alabama 

TALLADEGA, Ala — There was a 
time when Jeff Gordon didn't like 
restrictor- plate racing. No more. 

Gordon proved again Sunday lie b 
NASCAR"* new 
king of racing at 
plate tracks, 
fighting off 
cHaUenger after 
challenger on the 
way to winning 
the Aaron's 499 
at Talladega 
Superspetdway 
In overtime Gordon 

ft was 
Gordon's 10th victory overall and fourth 
In the last five races it Talladega and 
Daylona 



SPORTS 

ONLINE 

Mm SMrtt coverage. To read ohm- 
nfct Josh Wrtrt Input on Saturdays 
Spring Game and a recap of me trad 
teants performance in weekend action. 
as in www JattMrattguri com 




Lima 




1 



ARTS | ENTERTAINMENT | SEX | FOOD | YOUR LIFE. 

THE EDGE 



Monday, May 2, 2005 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Artistic release 




Chris Hanrwintkel | (Oil EUAN 



Pap singer Be n Kweller performs In front of a Urge crowd in forum Hall in (he ((State Student Union Friday night. Kweller was the final 1 act of Springiest Friday night in the Union. 



Ben Kweller headlines for local bands; 
event offers food, massages, games 



By KrisUn Roderick 

KHNSA.S SIAH COUtGIAN 

With his acoustic guitar, harmonica 
and keyboard, pop singfr Ben Kweller 
took center stage Friday nighl in Forum 
Hall al the K- State Student Union. 
Kweller was in K-State as a part ol 
Springiest, sponsored by the Union 
Program Council 

Prior to visiting K State, Kweller 
toured with Incubus, Ben Folds and 
Death Cab fur Culie 

Elizabeth Kuzila, sophomore in ap 
parel design, first saw Kweller when he 
was on tour with Ben Folds 

"He puts on a good show," she said 

During his performance in Forum 
Hall, Kweller poked fun at the clock 
tower in the Bosco Student Plaza 

Kuzila said wherever Kweller goes, 
he finds something lo relate to his audi- 
ence. 

"I love how when you see him live, 
he takes the time to make quips about 
where he is playing, mentioning the 
clock tower for instance," she said 

Kuzila last saw Kweller at the Uni- 
versity of Oklahoma She said he did 
the Boomer Sooner cheer with them 
He also mentioned that his sister went 
to the University of Oklahoma 

"They were ecstatic," Kuzila said 
"My Friends from K Slate, and I were a 
little confused, but all of the OU people 
loved it," 

Lauren Tice, freshman in English, 
said she had not heard of Kweller be- 
fore she saw him Friday. 

"I hadn't heard Ben before, so I had 
no idea what to expect," she said I tie 
really glad 1 got a chance to see him I 



"It's good to see 
K-State bringing 

in nationally 
renowned artists," 



Elizabeth Kuril* 
SOfHOMOfii IN »W*Mt DESIGN 



hope I'll get a chance to see him per- 

frirru .ijjjlii 

Tice said she was impressed with 
Kweller's talent 

"Ben Kweller was amazing," she 
said "His talent just oozed out of him. 
and he had a great stage presence. He 
was so much fun to watch ' 

Kweller headlined a concert with 
foot local bands: The Spins. The Math- 
ematics, Surphase and Kuskabank 

"It is nice to see a great mix of artists 
represented," Kuzila said "It's good to 
see K-State bringing in nationally 
renowned artists" 

Along with the four bands and 
Kweller performing, students could also 
be able to gel free therapeutic mas- 
sages, airbrush tattoos and sand art. 

"I got an airbrush tattoo, had a free 
funnel cake, made sand art and saw 
three of the five performances," Tice 
said "1 had a lot of fun I would lay ilu 
best part was watching the bands per- 
form." 

Kuzila said she was happy lo attend 
Springiest, 

I think that it is wonderful that 
K Slate has begun Springfest," she said 
It is a great idea to get people out and 
have fun " 




Chris Hanewinckel 1 1 01 
Bionston Hess, senior in art therapy, gets a free massage from Dave Hess Friday night. 
Massages were one of the many free events offered at Springfest. 




Jojlyn Brown | COIUGHN 
Going down an inflatable slide. Amy Randolph, 1, and Aaron Nelson, student al Hutchinson 
Community College. en|oy one of the activities during Springiest in the K State Student 



Kweller spills rewarding, unusual moments 



By Ryan C. Ftytw 

KANSAS STATE COtl SOWN 

Springfest was topped of! Friday with a 
concert featuring several local bands and 
headliner Ben Kweller About 45 minutes 
before the show, the Collegian was able to 
interview Kweller on (he future of his 
music and on life in general 

Q: What Is the biggest difference be- 
tween your first album, 'Sha Sha," and 
your most recent, "On My Way"? 

A: The material is a lot more focused, and 
the recording is a lot more raw There 
were three big themes in the last album. I 
got married to Liz. my long-time girl- 
friend, so ail the love sofas were about 
her and us. Then the somber moments 
were mostly about my grandfather, who 
passed away during live writing of "On My 
Way," so there is sort of a sweet and sour 
feel to the record Bui it's all recorded 
without headphones with one band in the 
room, some overdubs, but mainly just wild 
live tracks 



Q:Wh« 



i uy is the one thing 
1 about you? 



A: 1 feel like people think I'm a big stoner. 
1 used to smoke pot in high school a 
whole bunch. I used to do acid u lot with 
friends This one time 1 had a really bad 
trip, and so now whenever I smoke pot, it 
makes me so paranoid 1 sort of go back to 
that weird kind of place So I don't really 
tii i drugs at all 1'li have a beer or two at 
night after a gig. I'll see on the message 
board fans will be like "God, Ben was so 
drunk last night," and it's kind of weird. 1 
think it's just my personality. That is 
something people don't get; it's all natural. 

Q: What has been the most rewarding 
moment in your career thus far? 

A: There's been so many great moments 1 
would say one of the biggest things for me 
was opening up for the Violent Femmes 
They had me come on stage for their last 
song, and I played "Add It Up" with them 
They are one of my favorite bands of all 
lime To be able to open for them and 
then perform with them on stage was just 
mind-blowing 1 think I smiled the whole 
time, 

Q: What are the top five lislene4-lo 
aonp on your (Pod? 

* 



I 



A: The last tiling I listened lo was the Vel- 
vet Underground From the box set, 
there's some closet versions of some of 
their songs, early demos Also Creedence 
Clearwater Revival, some live bootlegs 
The new Bright Eyes. 

Q: What was one of your more unusual 
moments as an artist? 

A; f had this stalker (or a while who was 
Japanese and wrote these e mails to a 
friend, and she wrote two e-mails a day 
for a year, and he never wrote back. I 
never responded to her. For my birthday 
last year, he gave me a three-ring binder 
and named it, and it was a book of every 
e-mail in chronological order, and he is 
like, "Yeah, halfway through she breaks 
up with you, but then you guys get back 
together" There was a whole storyline it 
was so weird. 

Q; What is your next lour going lo be 
like? Are you going to headline? 

A; I'm going to do a headlining lour for 
my next record It depends on how the 
record shapes up I want to do a really 
lush and layered and real on hestrated, re- 
alty beautiful album Sort ofaomg back to 

s 



the "Sha Sha" essence, but even more 
produced and orchestrated I would like 
In get a bj*gH band, someone that just 
plays organ and piano the whole show. 
Definitely more of slage and lights pro- 
duction 1 wani lo do a country album, 
like a real country album Have some 
back-up singers on stage 

Q: Was the Bens IP (recorded with Ben 
Folds and Ben Lecj just a one-time deal 
or is there a future there? 

A: ll was a one-lime deal, but I think 
there might be something in the future. 
It's totally open-ended We all sort of got 
busy on our own after we did it I've 
talked to the guys about reforming, so we 
might do something 

Q: What is your next album going to be 
like? 

A: More like Tom Petty s Full Moon 
Fever"; 1 want il to sound like "Free 
Falling" Or like "Joshua Tree" Thai sort of 
mid lu late '80s, real beautiful, antithetic 
sound There's that vibe you get from 
songs like "Free Falling" or "Willi or 
Without You" They just have that great 
essence to them 



Page 7 



CELEB NEWS 

Elizabeth Smart makes 
People's list 

Elizabeth Smart, the Utah 
teenager who was abducted nearly 
three years ago. has won a mote 
upbeat recognition, being named one 
of People magazine's "SO Most 
Beautiful People" 

"It's i nice thing to have happen to 
hei at this time," said Id Smart. 
Elizabeth's lather "She was, of course, 
surprised II was great fot her self 
muge 

The annual "Beautiful People" 
issue, which hit newsstands friday, is 
usually filled exclusively with entertain- 
ment slan, but this year they are joined 
by the 1 7-year-old blonde 

Elizabeth was abducted from her 
bedroom in June 2002. Nine months 
later, she was found on a suburban 
street with a transient couple who were 
charged with kidnapping hei The legal 
case against Brian David Mitchell anrj 
Wanda Barzee is still pending 



"Star Wars" draws global 
farts for charity 

What new movie is worth waiting 
m line 19 days to see' fans, some in 
costume, standing in the Manhattan 
ram all had one answer "Star Wats 
Episode III Revenge of the Sith " 

But they didn't line up outside the 
Ziegfefd Theater on Saturday |ust to get 
into the premiere after midnight on 
May 19.TheStand A Thon benefits the 
Starlight Starbnght Children's 
f oundadon, a Canadian based nonprofit 
that aims to help severely ill children 
and their families 

The "Star Wars" devotees came 
from 20 slates and from Brazil, Great 
Britain, the Netherlands, Peru, Mexico, 
fiance, Sweden, Spain and Germany 

Trie 19-day wait isnt ^ bad as it 
sounds It's split among 2S0 people who 
signed up for shifts ranging from hours 
to days at a time, most btinging pledges 
to the children's foundation for every 
hour in line 



WEEKEND 
BOX OFFICE 

1 The Hitchhiker's Guide to the 
Galaxy" Touchstone Pictures 

2 "The Interpreter." Universal Pictures 
i "XXX: State of the Union. Columbia 
Pictures 

4. "The Amityville Horror ' MGM 

5. "Sahara Paramount Pictures 

6 "A tot like Love,' Touchstone 
Pictures 

7 ' Kung Fu Hustle," Sony Pictures 
Classics 

8 "fever Pitch," 20th Century fox 

9 "Robots," 20th Century Fox 

10 "Guess Who." Columbia Pictures 



BILLBOARD 
CHARTS 

Top 10 albums 

1. Rob Thomas,". Something to Be" 

2, Marian Carey, "The Emancipation of 
Mimf 

J, Make Jones, "Who is Mike tones?" 
4.110*0 , "II Dive" 

5. SO Cent, "The Massacre" 

6. Gwen Stefan), "love Angel Musk. 
Baby' 

7,Th* KWers, "Hot Fussr 

1. Green Day, "American Idiot" 

9. Various Arttets, Now 18" 

10. Soundtrack. "Three 6 Mafia Presents 
Choices II: The Setup" 

Country albums 

l.larry the Cable Guy The Right io 
Bare Arms" 

2. Rascal Flatts. 'feels Like Today' 
J.Retth Urban, "Be Here" 

4. Gretdven Wilson, "Here For The Party' 

5 . Suoartand "Twice the Speed of Life" 

6. Tan McGraw "Live like Vou Were 
Crying" 

7. Various Arttsls. "Totally Country Vol. 
4" 

t. Kenny Cnesney "When The Sun Goes 
Down" 

9. ShanU Twain. "Greatest Hits" 

1 0. team; Cnesney, "Be as you Are 
Songs from an Old Blue Chair" 



Rap albums 



1, Matt Jones "Who is Mike tones'" 

2. Soundtrack. Three 6 Mafia Presents 
Choices II: The Setup" 

J. »Cm, The Massacre" 

4. Beanie Skat). "The B. Coming* 

5. litdacrts The Red Light District" 
& 11m toM, The Documentary" 
7.W1 Sana* "lost and Found* 
lTX*UrtanLeoencT 

9. U Jon* The last Sale Boyi Crunk 
Juke" 

10. Eminem "Encore* 



CLASSIFIEDS 



To place an advertisement call 



Page 8 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Monday, May 2, 2005 



II ■ I ■ ■ _ 

!■ ■ jL,i ■ 



1 ■ I ! ■ ■ 
: u DJ I 1 



■ i 1 1 
i ■ 



1101 
For Rent- 
Apt, 

Unfurnished 



Rooms 

Available 



1201 

For Rent- 
Houses 



LET'S RENT 



For Rent- 
Apis. Furnished 

STUDIO APARTMENTS 
One block Irom campus 
Ample parking, quiet condi- 
tions Furnished M UtltUf- 
ni&hed June and August 
1319 (786)539-3638 



1101 
For Rent- 
Apt 
Unfurnished 

$500 Large two- bedroom. 

Dishwasher, disposal, cen- 
tral air June T f- 
(786)31 7-77 1 3 

$975/ MONTH Early Bird 
discount otter! Four-beo 
room two and one -halt balh 
town home with washer.' 
dryer provided Call 
(7Bi)H7 ?1H 

1026 BLUEMONT One 
and two-bedroom June I 
(765)317-7713 

1112 BLUEMONT one 
block to campus, iwo-bed- 
room available August t 
t7851?76-92S8 or (7851776- 
0683 

1126 BLUEMONT. Btudw 

apartments with il 
paid. Neutral colors with 
nice carpets Ov. 
Aggieville with ott-slreel 
parking Save on parking 
perm it* and walk to campus 
Available June t No pets 
(785)313-481?. 

1215 PONVTZ- One-bed 
room basement span mem 
with neutral colors and lull 
sire windows Large waik-m 
closet All bills paid $425 
August No pels (785)313- 
4812. 

12)5 THURSTON One 
block to campus One-bed- 
room apartment Newly ren- 
ovated $390 All bill* paid 
June lease No pels 
(785)539-0549 

1844 ANDERSON, new 

construction. tl. 

(uurn pmq belli pafaonaj 

washer, dryer. hi-./ 
internet available June t 
(785)554-13456 or (785)565- 

'.t'u 

asil N torn AUoea I i Hit 

pus Five minute walk to Un- 
ion or Aggieville Two-bed- 
room apartment* Big bed- 
rooms, central a< 
washer Washer, dryer on 
site First month rent free 
August lease Call tor excit- 
ing details (7851539-5508. 
No cats or dogs 

626 VATTIER- Two-bed- 

room spacious -iparlmeni. 
laundry facilities Water/ 
trash paid One year tease 
August t $430, (785)639- 
B7M 

814 THURSTON: Two-bed- 
room, June year lease No 
pets Water/ trash paid 
SWO 1785)539-5136. 

815 R ATONE One-bed 

room downstairs $425 617 
Kearney, one or two-bed 
room upstair* $425 820 
Colorado, basement effi- 
ciency, $275 No pats Au- 
gust. (785,776-8548 

91 1 Sunset, tour-bedroom, 
one block to c»mpu«. 
washer/ dryer provided 
Available August t 
(785)776-9288 or 1785)775- 
0683 

A ONE-BEDROOM June 
\. 1704 Fairview MOO 
Kearney (785)317-7713 

A TWO-BEDROOM, nice 
large dishwasher central 
air One year or 8 month 
lease (78513177713 

BLOCK TO CAMPUS: Spe- 
cious two-bed<oom. Ncj 
pets Water and iraan tu> 
mshed (785I539-4568 



CRESTWOOO APART- 
MENTS West side two- 
bedroom, one and one-hatt 
baths Personal wasnerr 
dryer, tireptace pool Water, 
trash, cable paid No pels 
$570- 1670 (785)776-3345. 
ceBtwoodapadments com 

FOUR- BEDROOM, TWO 
Iviihroom. Neal old home 
near park and campus, new 
remodel water/ trash paid 
pels, laundry, Aug t 
» 44 8i' 

NEW 12-PLEX available 
June Two-bedroom luxury 
apartments 1010 Blue/nont. 
two ADA friendly $800 
north (7851776-2)02 
or (785)556-2014 Nopals 

NEW DUPLEX, three bad 
room Central heat' air, 
washer I dryer nook -up, drsh- 
wa»her oft- street parking, 
1 battel, water and 
trash paid Donl miss this 
one' (785)341-2921 or 
(785)776-3218 

ONE AND two-bedroom 



TWO-BEDROOM ONE 

balh Cloae to campus 
1826 Anderson Water and 
trash paid (785)341^4496 

WALK TO CAMPUS Spa- 
clous two-bedroom apart- 
ments, lots ot windows, qui- 
et conditions ample park- 
ing, furnished or unfurnish- 
ed, washer/ dryer in apart 
menl. reasonable rent 
June and August No pets 
(7851539 3636 



For Renl- 
HOUMM 

11000 FOUR-BEDROOM. 2 
bath duplex Only tour 
yean oM, Good sized bed- 
rooms June. Emerald Prop- 
erty Management (785)566- 



1950 



0) (785J341-336S 



ONE TWO Ihree tour-bed- 
; irtments arid hous- 
es June and August 
leases No pel 

-11975 1785)313- 

ONE- AND two-bedrooms 

Walk io campus covered 
parking. June 1 and Aug 1 
leases very nice- 1 (785)341- 
6000. 

ONE-BEDROOM AND Stu- 
dlo apartments. One-bed- 
room. $280/ monlh Studio 
$260/ month All utilities ex- 
cept electric paid Lease 
and deposit required. Avail- 
able June 1 (785)537-7794 

ONE -BEDROOM apart- 
ment. 1225 Clatlln $415/ 
pejl deposit No pels 
(785)486-2812 

ONE-BEDROOM apart- 
ment. Gas. 1 water' trash 
paid Lauii'Jiv litrnties One 
hi 1 $360.00. 
(785)539-6704. 

ONI BEDROOM NEXT io 

campus . I water 

included Available June t 

-m i (765)313-7473 

ONE-BEDROOM WITH 
neutral colors tor August 
Across trom City Park with 
oil -street parking Local 
landlords who care and 
maintain the property Wa- 
ter/ trash paid. No pets 
(785131 • 

ONE-BEDROOM. AVAILA- 
BLE August Close to cam- 
pus Waler trash paid Cen- 
(785)537-7810 

ONE BEDROOM TWO 

btocks to campus and Ag- 
ue villi- Washer/ dryer 
Pelt Ok (786)317-7713 

PRE-LEA5ING JUNE and 
August Some units brand 
new. close to KSU. washer/ 
dryer included. Can let §> 
02 or 
(765)556-2014 No pets 

THREE BEDROOM CLOSE 
lo campus Central air. 
dishwasher, laundry facili- 
ties No pets (785)539- 
0866 

TWO AND three bed 
rooms Close to campus 
Spacious dishwasher, cen 
fral air laundry facilities No 
pets (765)530-0866 

TWO-BEDROOM APART 
MENTS. Available June. Ju 
ly and August 1114 Ber 
Irand I $680). 1200 Fremont 
($600- $6401 701 N Oth 
($500- $550). 2014 Seafon 
(1630), 523 Mora ($530) 
363 N 14th ($520- 600) 
www.rant-apm.cpm, 
(766)639-4357. 



$1200: FOUR-BEDROOM, 
TWO bathroom duplex 
three btocks trom campus 
and Aggieville One year 
did, available August 1 Call 
Bnan at (785)845-81 12 

$435 TWO-BEDHOOM du 
plex with central air and 
washer/ dryer. Augusi 
Emerald Property Manage- 
ment (785)556-6899 

1116 COLORADO Street 

Four large bedrooms, two 
balh New central air sys 
tern, all major appliances, 
washer/ dryer included Au- 
gust lease $225/ room 
(820)272-4149. 

725 MORO. Nice tour-bed- 
room, near campus. Aggie 
vine Large detached ga- 
rage, washer/ dryer, dish- 
washer $1000/ month. 
Available June 1 (913)710- 
4730 

A CLOSE Sit or tlve-bed- 
room. two bath, central an 
Dishwasher, washer dryer, 
pels okay June 1 
(785)317-7713 



A GREAT yard tor 
Cues and tun. Spacious 
houses Three, tour, and 
live -bedrooms All applian- 
ces Close to stadium 
Plaasa call (785(539 1 1 77 

FOUR-BEOROOM, TWO 

and one- halt bath at $975/ 
month. (765)537-2111 or 
century2ikntght.com 

FOUR BEDROOM. TWO 
balh duplex 1410 Houston 
hall mile from campus, laun- 
dry, single property landlord 
No smoking, no pels 
$1150/ month. August 1 
(765)776-9260 

FOUR BEDROOM. TWO 
bath houee. Single car ga- 
rage, central air. dlshwastv 
er fireplace West side ot 
campus. 1900 square tool 
Available August 1 Doug 
1785)313-5573 

FOUR-BEDROOM, TWO 

bath house Close to cam- 
pus and KSU stadium. 

Plenty ott-slreel parking 
June. Emerald Property 
Management (785)556- 
6899 

FOUR BEDROOM. TWO 
bath house Washer' dryer 

great location Spacious in- 
tenor Some pets okay Aug 
t lease (913)963-7422 



FOUR-BEDROOM. TWO 
balh large house. Close to 
campus Washer, dryer 
dishwasher air $250 each 
person (768)776-1100. 

LOOK! BRAND NEW 

HOUSE! Four-bedroom two 
balh Washer/ dryer refrlger 
ator. central air One-hall 
mile to campus Augusi 
lease $1400/ month Under 
construction 1614 Pierre 
(786)304-0387. (7B5)776- 
9124 

THREE-BEDROOM AVAIL 
ABLE June Close to cam 
pus Fenced yard Pets on 
approval <7«>537-mo 



MOVE IN Now, 1019 Hous- 
ton Three- bedroom wtlh 
day room upstairs Kitchen 
appliances Near City Park 
downtown, and AgflieviiiB 
$645 (417)823-9480 

NEAR AGGIEVILLE tour 
bedroom house, central air. 
conditioning, oft- street park- 
ing, $1000 per monlh plus 
utilities (765)537-8070 

NEW LISTING: Available 
soon. Three -bedroom, two 
bath Large living room, 
game room computer room 
Located at 916 Bertrand. 
washer/ dryer, central air. 
yard, front porch (785)539 
3672 

NEW SPACIOUS tour-bed- 

room duplex two bath two 
lull laundry, game room with 
wet bar 928 Osage $1200 
(785)539-1564 

NICE HOUSES for rent 

Three, lour five and eight- 
bedrooms Close to cam- 
pus June. July and August 
leases Call Cult (620)242- 

HENT-APM.CQM. NOW 
leasing bouse*, apart- 
ment* and duplexes Avail- 
able now June, July . and 
Augusi w^rw,refltJOoi,QBm, 
I ?8;,)539-43S7 

THREE, FOUR, Uve-bed- 
room houses Close lo 
campus Oft- street parking. 
Washer/ dryer June and 
August leases (785)449- 
2181. 

THREE-BEDROOM DU- 
PLEX. Available June 
Trash and mowing paid 
Central an Washer- dryer 
(785)537-7810 

THREE-BEDROOM 
HOUSE. 1516 Campus. 
$900/ month Close to Vet 
Med Teaching Hospital 
June lease (720)733-1659 
evenings after 7:00pm 

THREE-BEDROOM 

HOUSE June/ Augusi avail 
able $1206 electric/ gas/ 
water/ trash paid Washer 
dryer shared with basement 
(785)341 -6607. 

THREE BEDROOM HOUS- 
ES and apartments. June 
and August (eases Close lo 
campus No pets (785)539- 
1975 or (785)3 13-8296 

THREE BEDROOM HOUS- 
ES and apartments starling 
at $750- $1100 Close lo 
campus June and August 
leases No pets (765)539- 
1975 or (785)3 13-6296 

THREE -BEDROOM ONE 
bath 730 Pottawatomie 
Washer/ dryer. Indge. stove 
dishwasher, central air One 
cai garage with big back- 
yard. $825/ month. 
(785)207-0212 

TWO TEARS old Fout- 
bedroom. two and one- ha II 
bath ALL appliances includ- 
ing washer, dryer, micro- 
wave Great floor plan with 
large bedrooms No pels 
August $1200 (785)556- 
6699. 

TWO- BEDROOM. $550 
Three-bedroom. $750 

Close to campus Washer/ 
dryer, centra! air (785)776 
2100 



Roommate 
Warned 

FEMALE HOUSEMATE No 
drinking/ smoking. $275/ 
month One-third utilities. 
washer, dryer. August 
I****. *njM3!3.«k»M,«<iu 

Of (785)537. 1464 

GUVS SHARE a house. 

$300/ month and share utilit- 
ies Close 10 City Park After 
6 pm, can (785)456-9100 



ROOM AVAILABLE in tour- 
bedroom apartment May- 
July 3i Close to campus, 
large rooms Rent $21 $ |ne- 
gotiabU i plus cheap utilities 
May rani paid (785)341- 



Mil 




For Rent- 
buTtetin Apts. Furni»he<J 
board 



Aiwiounctw 



ivnt- 



•LEAHN TO FlV K-StaSS 
Flying Club has live air- 
planes and lowest rales 

C*lt (786I776-1744 

www kau.edu/hstc 



020 

Lost 










(hues 




Let* 


tree tot 


-an be 
days 








rjJBjra) 





For Rent- 
Apia FumiWteo) 

Manhattan City Ordinance 
4614 assures every per- 
son equal opportunity |„ 
housing without distinc- 
tion on account el 
Ms, 

It 

national 
ancestry V Iota- 
be reported 
to the Director or Human 
Resources at City 
(786)$87-2440. 



1101 
For Rent- 
Apt 

UflfUrTWMd 



1101 
For Rent- 
Apt 
Unfurnished 




WILDCAT 

PROPERTY 

MANAGEMENT 

537-2332 

IS07Poyna#l 

2 BD @ $525 

l509Poyna#l 

I LG BD @ $550 

washer & dryer 

All Bills Paid 
June or August 



FOUR43EDROOM AT 1521 •***■ JULy ; ***** J*** 



1476 CLEAN, fuomy t#o- 



Leavenworttv St. $960. 



balh to mne-ptex. No pet* 
One-year <*■** 3032 Kim 
bell (766)630-6846 



OJ 



m itasing one, two. Ihree, tour- 
3^' bedroom apar'menli and 

WHBM401 5^J^^ 1,filTUm 



AVAILABLE AUGUST 1 
Cum to campus One-bed- 
room apartment (766)667- 
0620. 

TWflEE AND Ibjr-badrOWM 
w n ta m l* Auiaual Ctoe* to 
rwrrvnjft vVjt*r Hun paid 
Centra! air coin operated 
laundry i768|5|t rato 

t76»rl3T.236S 




TWO BEDROOM APART- 

duplex**, and 
house* Sever*! locations 
Available June, July, snd 
August www r*ni -apm.com. 
(7»)539-*357 

TWO-BEDflOOM9 JUNE 1 
and August t doe* to own- 



TOWN 
HOMES 



MALE WANTED Three- 
bedroom, washer/ dryer, 
central air, July tease $300/ 
month, one-third utilities 
(785)392-4858 

ROOMMATE WANTED: 

preferably mala to share 
two-bedroom house with 
cenlral heat and sir One- 
hall block trom campus 
June leas* Call Tom 
(785)341 ^098 

ROOMMATES WANTED 
tor a four -bedroom house on 
Pierre Great rent Call 
(6201727-3205 

1501 



Sublease 

1109 Kearney A Block lo 
campus Two-bedroom 
apartmenl. washer/ dryer 
$475 all bills paid. Two 
month lease June and July 
No pets (785)317-3021 

ALL BILLS paid, four-bed 
room, two bath, pool, inter- 
net, washer/ dryer As soon 
as possible Contact Devon 
(913)408-7236 

APARTMENT FOH sum- 
mer sublease. Nice two- 
bedroom apartment Quiet 
location $500 Call 
(765)776-9009. 

BOY OR gin $250/ month 
Fall 2005- Spring 2006 
17IS Anderson Mr 
Street from the Alumni Cen- 
ter Call Zack Claar 
(913)244-8473 

FEMALE SUBLEASERS 
wanted June and July 

four-bedroom house, clean 
and spacious 618 Kearney 
Available mid-May 

(7851341-6022 

FURNISHED ACROSS Ihe 
street from campus at 1739 
Anderson Four-bedroom 
lemaie only trash paid 
please call (785)539-9636 

HOUSE THREE-BED- 
ROOMS available tor sum- 
mer sublease Big house 
and bedrooms, good loca- 
tion (926 Laramie) Air-con - 
ditioning, furnished, great 
roommate Rent negotis- 
blet(620)353 8628 
(785)770-3457. 

LARGE TWO BEDROOM 

two bath available June t 
July 29 Apartmenl complex 
is Campus East located al 
Clallm and McCain Lane 
Has pool, balcony, fireplace, 
dishwasher, and microwave 
Pets allowed Close to 
campus and Aggieville Rent 
is $265/ roommate or $530/ 
month (785(341-9257 

ONE-BEDROOM SUB- 

LEASE and three-bedroom 
sublease availabe for June 
and Jury Emerald Properly 
Management (785)556- 



1013-102Q McCoHum 
2 Bedrooms 



DIAMOND 



785-537 7701 



ROOM FOR rent lor sum- THREE-BEDROOM HOUS- 

mer Females only Cheap ES, apartments, and dupler- 

rern Close to campus. Call •»- Several locations Avail- 

(785)789-4795 aWe June. July and Augusi 
Pets allowed in most 

www tenl-apm com 

1 20 *aaoooooooooooB* ( 85)539-4357 



For Rent- 
Houses 

BIG HOUSE Six-bedrooms, 
two kitchens, two baths, two 
Irving rooms Duplex three- 
bedroom AH clean Good 
condition (765)537-2289 



ONE, THREE AND tour- 
bedrooms No smoking, no 
dnnking, no pels 1785)539- 
1554 

ONE, TWO. three and tour- 
bedroom apartments Close 
lo campus and Aggieville 
('i-.ritvcisher. laundry, and 
parking (785)537-6017 

ONE, TWO, Ihree bed- 
rooms Available June and 
August (785)537-7138 or 

(765)313-1256 

ONE BEDROOMS ANO stu- 
dios Close to campus 
Available June and Augusi 
www renl-apm com 
1785)539-4157 

PARK PLACE APART 
MENTS. Hurry > ! avaiability 
limited One- Iwo 
bedrooms (765)639-2951. 

UNIVERSITY 
TERRACE ARTS. 

tyuYwus 2 & 3 Bedroom A/Hi 

WoAcr/Dryer 

or rVflJlWlrryrr Hotbupi 

SfDiim Grounds & JW 

Note 
1530 College Ave. 

CALL 537-20% 
9 A.m. to 6 p.m. 



Three Bedrooms 
Near Campus 



1838 Anderson $780 
516 N 16- St (750 

122SRatone $735 

519 H Manhattan $750 
1019 Fremont $660 



Two Bedrooms 

519 N Manhattan $580 



Brookside Mgmt 
537 1746 



SUBLEASER NEEDED: 
two-bedroom, one hath, two 
btocks to campus, on* block 
io Aggieville Rsnl $660/ 
n* got labia June/ July 
(785)539-4487 

SUMMER SUBLEASE 
$260/ month at University 
Commons Fully furnished 
with washer' dryer W* pay 
all sublease lee* plus $50/ 
monlh rent! Call Tim 
(620)755-1079 

VERY NICE one-bedroom 

by the mall Washer/ dryer 
and dishwasher Available 
tor summer Rent negotia- 
ble Call (785)770-2224, 



1201 

For Rent- 
Housee 

TMREE-BEOROOM, TWO 
balh home Clean, newly TO 
modeled new appliances 
Oft -street parking and ga 
rage $900 rem Flexibtto 
lease starling dele 
(785)341-6515. 



DUPLEX LARGE four-bed- 
room, two and one-halt bath 
new i ampus bm Uprjamlle 

(785)637-6017 

FIVE SIX and seven-bed 
room house (two three 
kitchens) Available June. 
July, and August Several 
locations www renl- 

apm com (785)539-4357 

FOUR AND five bedrooms 
Available June and August 
(7851537-7138 or (785)313 

ISM 

FOUR-BEDROOM HOUSE 
Washer.' dryer Nice large 
rooms OH- si reef parking 
(7851537-1566 

FOUR-BEDROOM HOUS- 
ES and duplexes Several 
locations Available June. 
July, and August Pels al- 
lowed m most www rent- 
apmcom [785)539-4357 

FOUR-BEDROOM, FOUR 
bathroom Available August 
New construction Close to 
campus and Aggieville. No 
pels Washer/ dryer provid- 
ed. Cenlral an (785)539- 
9582 

FOURBEDROOM. TWO 
bath house 1711 Colorado 
Washer/ dryer and dt*tv 
washer Available June, Ju- 
ly or August SIJOOV month 
(785)539-099) 

FOUR-BEDROOM TWO 
bath, 918 Thurston, all appli- 
ances air -conditioning, 
laundry Clean, no pets Off- 
street parking August lease 
$1000 plus utilities 
(785)323-0061 

FOUR-BEDROOM. TWO 
btocks from campus 1636 
Harry $1000/ month Call 
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• Medical Insurance 

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occupancy. bills paid 
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Monday, May 2, 2005 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 9 



K-State students help at carnival 



By Joanna Rubiik 
HANSASSTAIKOUEGIAN 

Michael Leu th old, sixth grad- 
er at Wood row Wilson Elemen- 
tary School, was ready to plunge 
back into the water. 

Although the weather was 
nice, Leuthold was drenched be- 
cause he signed up for the dunk 
tank at the school's carnival Sat- 
urday 

The dunk tank was just one of 
many activities at the carnival 

Members of the K.SU Rotaract 
Club helped at the carnival 

Kasi Monk, fall 2004 K State 
graduate, and Sarah Coover, ju- 
nior in agribusiness and interna- 
tional studies, monitored the in- 
flatable moon walk 
* "It's a lot of fun to come out 
with the little kids," Coover said 

Some of the kids had too 
much fun - Coover said two 
threw up Other than that, she 
said they had fun and were wait- 
ing their tum to jump 

"I'm having a blast," Monk 
said "Thai's the only reason I'm 
^ticking around " 
1 Maury Angelo, sophomore in 
elementary education, and Adri- 
anne Novovich, sophomore in in- 
terior design, were taking money 
and tickets at the concession 
.Stand They were helping out with 
Titlier Sigma Kappa Sorority 
members. 




Joslyn Brown| 'OLUCIAN 
At Woodrow Wilton tlementiiy school. Anthony Dodton, % picks a number four duck at the duck pond on Saturday. The carnival had booths 
ranging from a football throw and dunk tank to a cake walk and auctions. 



"I jusl thought it would be 
fun." Novovich said "All the kids 
are so cute" 

Angelo said she enjoyed work- 
ing with the kids. 

"It's been real busy," she ttid 
"Its the sort of thing I'll do when 
I'm working" 



The Parent Teacher Associa- 
tion revived the event three years 
ago, Kathy Lindsay, president of 
Wilson's PTA, said 

Lindsay said the school used 
to have a carnival but it stopped 
for a few years. 

"They hadn't done it for sever- 



al years," she said. "This year it 
turned out really great." 

The carnival is a fund-raising 
event lor the school, but the kids 
love it, Lindsay said 

"We're here to make some 
money, but it's really all about the 
kids," she said "1 love doing it" 



Fishing tournament builds relationships among undergrads 



By Adam Hanks 

MlriASSTi.nC0Uf.GIAN 

Strong winds and white- 
capped waves on Milford Lake 
gTeetcd participants at the fourth 
annual K Slate American lish 
eries Society hstntig tournament 
Saturday morning 

Around 15 students, faculty 
members and Manhattan resi- 
dents participated in the tourna- 
ment, which was open to the pub- 
lic 

The tournament was divided 
into two categories, with pr 
awarded for the person with the 
largest fish and with the six largest 
fish combined 

Jeff Eilzinann, the president of 



the K-Stale AFS subunit and a se- 
nior in fisheries and wildlife biol- 
ogy, said he didn't have any luck 
during the tournament, but he at- 
tributed part of it to the weather 

"The temperature has some- 
tiling to do with it. it's pretty cold 
for this lime ol ywf he said 
"That and fishery biologists are 
belter at sampling Bah thin catch- 
ing them " 

B though high winds bat- 
tered the participants" boats on 
the water, Eitzmann said it was 
not much of a deterrent. 

"It was easy to drift, but after 
you get off the water, you feel like 
you're walking funny," he said 

While the fishing wasn't as 
good for some as it was lor others, 



everyone was still able to have a 
good time, and there were more 
than enough fish to feed all the 
participants and then some dur 
ing the fish fry held after the 
3 p.m. weigh-in 

Greg Eitzmann, Jeffs lather, 
was awarded for caiching the 
largest fish, a five pound walleye 
Eli Sprcnkle had the largest 
Winger, or largest collection of 
fish, and was also given a cash 

prize. 

"It's the same spots I've heen 
fishing since 1 went out with my 
grandpa." Sprenkle said 

The tournament was open to 
anyone |eff Eitzmann said, and 
ihe only requirement was a $5 
entry fee The only rules (or the 



tournament were that only game 
fish could be taken and only b 
fish could be weighed on the 
stringer 

The tournament is part ol sev- 
eral activities the AFS holds IK h 
year, but it is the only one that 
gives participants a chance to 
relax 

"it's more of a social activity, a 
chance to build some cama- 
raderie amongst the undergradu- 
ates," Keith Gido, itriltnrri profa 

• >f biology and adviser lot the 
group, said 

Though it was a competition. 
the atmosphere of the touma 
men) was definitely relaxed, leff 
I ii/mann said Evefyom was just 
out to have a good time 



Washburn center 

helps entrepreneurs 

start businesses 



By Adriann* DeWaesc 

KANSAS STAnCOUEGIAk 

Small businesses have 
local access to resources 

Washburn Small Business 
Development Center has a 
branch office in Ihe Manhat- 
tan Area Chamber of Com- 
merce to offer its services to 
local residents 

Chad Jackson, consultant 
lor Washburn Small Business 
Development Center, serves 
Riley, Pottawatomie and 
Geary counties 

The headquarters for Small 
Business Development Center 
used to be located at K- Stale 
hut is now located at Wash- 
burn University in Topeka. 

The Small Business Devel 
opment Center was discontin- 
ued al K-State's College of 
Business Administration in 
2003 due to reductions in the 
college's base budget 

Var Ebadi. dean of College 
of Business Administralion, 
said Ihe Manhattan Area 
L lumber of Commerce want- 
ed to keep the development 
center in Manhattan afford- 
able 

Les Streit. director of 
Washburn Small Business De- 
velopment Center, said the 
center was relocated to Wash 
burn to include ihe counties 
K-State wasn't able to fund, 

Strait said K-State and 
Washburn still work together 
wilh services for entrepre- 
neurs by making appropriate 
referrals to K-Stale-assisled 
resource providers 

Washburn Small Business 

Development Center has ac- 
cess to resources on market 
ranting, record 

keeping and job market per 



Fast facts 

Washburn Small Business 
Development Center 
2004 statistics 

■ Helped start 52 new busmevwi 

■ Helped create 89 full time job 

■ Helped create 94 part time |obs 

■ Businesses saw a $7 million increase 
in sales 

■ Helped businesses secure mem? than 
S7 million in loans 

forniatue 

They also provide low tost 
training seminars on topics 
involving small businesses, 
such as customer service, 
record keeping and financial 
analysis 

Jackson said anyone Inter- 
ested in starting a small busi- 
ness should write a husiness 
plan. 

"The number one reason 
businesses fail is because they 
don't have a business plan," 
he said 

The center reviews busi- 
ness plans and offers sugges- 
tions free o( charge. JaCKSOn 
said 

Slreit encourages students 
who are interested in starting 
a small business in take antra 
preneurship and small busi- 
ness consulting classes at 
K- Stale- 
He also said students 
should work for a small busi- 
ness during the summer or For 
a part-job during ihe school 
year 

"The classes and jobs 
would give students the rele- 
vant, first-hand experience 
they need in setting up and 
opening a business." he said 



ar^^L\ ^hral wf ^asst I w I saP ^M 



in the KANSAS STATE CoLLEf.lAN 



CLASSIFIEDS 



1901 



(or Rent- 
Houses 

ftlURBEDROOM TWO 
Mock* west ol campus 
£130 Coftage Height* $275/ 



Washer/ dryer, central neat. 
air -conditioner June t 
tease (7851944-3491 Pets 
pJrjoliaWe 

Sofl HEDHOOM CLOSE 
£ campus' City Park Wash- 
M, dryer and dishwasher 
♦arge house June lease 
^85)341-5070 

JUNE. JUL*. August Mo* 
leasing one. two. three, lour. 
live. tin. Seven, sigihl-bed- 
' •ousts and duplexes 
**« r • n I ' a e ") com 
1,7851539-4357 

NEW LISTING: Available 

soon. Three-bedroom two 
bath targe living room, 
jume room computer room 
located at 918 Bern and 
•crasher' dryer, central air 
51rd, tronl porch (785)539- 
372 

j "m ree-iiedroom 

-HOUSE on College View 
dose to west side ot cam- 
■pus Available June 1 S84CV 
•month 1785)257-3488 Of 
7785 14 78-0222 



T H REE 


.BE DROOM 


HOUSE June 1 


(_.fii|. tl air 


Pet* ajtowed Washer/ dryer 


provided 


1825 


(785)539- 


9582 







■ THREE BEOBOOM, ONE 

; bath house wilh d«n 

. Range, refrigerator, washer ' 

dryer included Realty ctoae 

to campus Musi *•• 

(786)463-5014 




NEW FINANCE Plan availa 
tola oh 2002 and news' two 
and three-bedroom homes 
Only $1000- $2000 down, 
easy credit approval, and il 
costs lass than renting Call 
Today (785)539-5841 or 
(8661509-5325 (Terms end 
Conditions Apply). 




BRAND NEWI Two and 
Jjfee-bedfcwm manutac- 
■Jwed home* lor rent 
Jomta wflrt all appliances. 
jjeludJng waarwt' dryer 
■4*ent doom starting al 1550 
Call lodayl 
»i (Term* and 
► apply). 



For Sale- 
Mobile Homes 

16XB0 2001 SchulH Sen 
satron Tnree-bedroom two 
balh $29,500 or besi otter 

(7851565-0724 

rw<> hi DROOM ONf balti 
mobile home Cats and 
small dogs allowed Lot ram 
S145' month S9O00 or best 
otter (785)587 7805 



Roommate 
Wanted 

AvAiLABlF FALL Male or 
lemale non-smoker No 
pels Three-Bedroom 

Washer/ dryer Cable/ Inter- 
net 1350V month 20 
ley Lane (913)568-8233 
April 

FEMALE WANTED Fun- 

be d roo m , two and one-hall 
bath Vanity/ sink in each 
room One-fourth uMitta* 
One Block trom c 
Start August 1 Jen 
(620)820-3745 Hannah 
(9131669-4501 

FEMALE WANTED Sham 
Iwo -bedroom house One 
block to campus A 
May 1 $250. all 
paid Call (7851537-4947 

RESPONSIBLE FEMALE 
loommales wanted tor luxu- 
ry tour bedroom apartment 
across street Irom west 
campus No pets, no smok- 
ing, short lease okay 

(785)776-6318 

ROOMMATE NEEDED, 
June or August. $245' 
month, one -third u Mi lies 
about $60. heat paid, across 
Irom City Pack Call Adam 
(620)655-1101 

ROOMMATES NEEDED 
pay one-tourth unlit** Nice 
house, lencod-m backyard 
quiet nieghborhood Call tor 
detail, (318)461-7377 

ROOMMATES WANTED 
New three bedroom, Iwo 
bath house August Lease 
Outside pels okay Call 
Brian (7851567-6447 

WANTED ROOMMATES to 
share three-bedroom apart- 
ment next to campus UMit 
tea paid Central air Wash 
tr/ dryer $325 each August 
1 or before (785)638-5446 
(785)885-3405 (768)562- 
8755 



Lost something? 



Sublease 

FEMALE WANTED lor June 
and Jury sublease $200/ 
month or negotiable One 
halt block Irom campus 
washer. 'dryer, trash and wa- 
ter paid Call (78' 
8110 

FEMALE WAN THi r,,, .. ur; 
rt* sublease Starting May 
Augual $180/ 
month plus iJiiiiims Ten mt- 
■ii. !.■ ■/. ilku || distance to 

Four bed i. 
bathroom house Washer/ 
dryer Call (785)778-9746 

JUNE/ JULY Chase Apart- 
ment One bedroom in lour- 
bedroom wilh three guys 
$250 per mon(h plus elec- 
(620)544-9527 or 
t..Mijhni.' l ni''h,iri«hr.i!ni;ul i; 
«TI 

ONE BEDROOM APART 
ME NT available lor June 
subtests Ctoae to campus 
Also available tor August 
Lease price negotiable Call 
( 785)34' 

ONE-BEDROOM SUB 
LEASE pels allowed dose 
lo campus May rent paid 
available May 18 i9 13)424- 
3777 

SUBLEASER NEEDED! 
Walk to school and Aggie 
ville One-bedroom apart- 
ment $275/ month June 
through July Available May 
23 Call Roy (785)34 18487 

SUMMER SUBLEASE two- 
bedrDom apartment Close 
to campus Cad Chris lor de- 
tails (913)488-0118 

TWO ROOMS avail able In 
lour bedroom newer apart- 
ment Washed dryer includ- 
ed Low utilities Close to 
campus and Aggievitie 
Rent $287 per month Call 
(820)288-8992 or (620)79.1- 
2200 

TWOBEDROOM APART- 
ME NT available lot summer 
$520/ month Close lo Ag- 
gieviiie Available June. 
10M Bluemont (785)537 
4426 

TWO BE O ROOM. ONE 
bath available now through 
Jury 28 Pool and laundry la- 
ciKita*. One block from cam 
pus 1535 par month 
(7*S)M1-9191 



300 

employmen t/ 
opportunities 



3101 



3101 



3101 



Help Wanted 

The Collegian cannot veri- 
fy the financial potential ol 
advertisements In the Em- 
ployment/Career classifi- 
cation Reader* are ad- 
vised to approach any 
such employment oppor- 
tunity with reasonable 
caution The Co I log I an 
urge* our reader* to con- 
tact Ihe Better Business 
Bureau, 501 SE Jefferson. 
Topeka, KS 66607-1190. 
(785)232-0434 

Manhattan City Ordinance 
4814 assure* every per 
son equal opportunity in 
securing and holding em 
ploy ment in any field ot 
work or labor for which 
he/ she I* property quali- 
fied regard leas of race. 
sei. military status, disa- 
bility religion, age. color, 
national origin or ances- 
try Violations should be 
reported to the Director of 
Humsn Resources at City 

Mali, (785)587-2441 

IBARTENDINGI $300 a day 
potential No experience 
necessary Training provid- 
ed Call 1 -600-965-6520 eirt 




ATTN: ARCHITECTURE 
students Los Angelas- 
based design firm In need 
of draftsman. Looking for 
third or fourth-year stu 
dant for part-time posi- 
tion Make Loe Angela* In- 
come with Kansas living 
cost Musi be proflcienl 
with AutoCad 2002 or later 
and be able to produce 
floor plane and detailed 
sections. Call JNM De- 
signs (310)784-8188, ask 
tor Jerod. 

STUDENT TECHNOLOGY 
Assistant in Technology 
Service Center Assist with 
installation and maintatMnc* 
ol technology classroom 
equipment Prefer candidate 
with Audio Visual equipment 
and computer experience 
Hours are t- 10pm Monday 
through Friday 20 hours per 
week dunng semesters, tun- 
lima during summer and 
breaks, $7 00 hour Contact 
fmlHIpa at 
'3341 tot further in 
formation Submil applica- 
tion in room #121 East Ste 
dlum 



Help Wanted 

COL DRIVERS FOR SUM 
MER WORK Covafl World- 
Wide Moving is looking tor 
college students wilh a 
Class A or B Commercial 

License lot ' 
summer wortt Need to stay 
in town lor summer, stay in 
shape, and save some 
cash'' Great mlemship alter- 
native and take advantage 
cit your enisling lease/ rental 

ragraarnani Jot) M to pet 

lorm packing, loading, and 
, fit household ijoods 
-miliary and commer- 
cial customers along with 
COL vehicle to a lo 
la Apply as soon as 
possible at 618 9 l1 " SI 
on Fort Rilay Blvd Very 
I 'we $9 00 to S 1 1 00 
i»?s Job 
begins immediately rOSOW 
i rig Spring finals week 
i r. rough summer and option- 
al part-time work in Fall ol 
2005 Equal Opportunity 
Employer 

DANCE TEAM Coach. USD 
3713. Riley County I* accept 
ing applications lor a Dane* 
Team coach lor Riley Coun- 
ty High School Pleas* con 
lacl Becky Pull* al 
(785)485-4000 or 
tJCuJtfgjj Sd378.org 

FULL TIME SUMMER h*k> 
wanted Rool truss menu 
laclunng plant, 5107 Murray 

R.I l7B>>j7 7fi : 5ufl1 

GET PAID for your opin- 
ions! Earn $15- $125 and 
mora per survey! 
www moneyforsurvey* co 
m 

GRADUATE ASSISTANT 
SHIP in Educational Innova- 
tion and Evaluation, May- 
August, must be enrolled in 
six graduate level Credit 
hours See 

WWW.KiU.Bdu/MiB tor de- 
scription and application in- 
structions Email 
CShumfln.fi Kjsg edu tnr more 
in formal i on 

GREAT OPPORTUNITY 
Seeking a live in nanny, rel 
erences a must, babysitting 
experience necessary 
(785)537-9699 

GREAT SUMMER income 
Asb est os Abatement Work 
era needed 40 hours ol tree 
training is required Class 
Starts May 31 tuna through 
June 3, BOO. 4:30pm 
$1160 pat hour Contact 
Laborer* Local 1290, 710 
Mora, for *n application or 
call (785)537-1567 

SUMMER MAY hutp Long 
hours Good $$$ (785)587- 
MSf. 



Help Wanted 

HELP WANT! 

harvesting, combine opera- 
tors and truck drivers Guar- 
anteed pay Good Itaytfnet 
wages Call (9701483-7490 
evenings 

HOMELAND SECURITY 
Kansas Army National 
Guard 'Up lo $15,000 Prior 
Service sign on bonuses 
'Up lo $10,000 Non-Prior 
Service sign on bonuses 
'100% College T union As 
sislai.ee '$18,000 Studem 
Loan Repayment Pp. 
Contact SFC Mike Wesiphai 
til K-Slale Ui- 
(785)532-2384; Cell 

(785)806-2121 
mwesfchaCkKjtBiBj 

LUBE TECH' Automotive 
Maintenance Specialist 
Pan -time positions available 
immedlalaly CaH (785)565- 
5280 with personal inlnrma 

MOVIE EXTRAS/ MODELS 
Needed! Young laces need 
ed to till a variety ol fobs' 
Candidates needed tor 
crowd and background 
scene* for local productions 
No experience required I AM 
looks needed! Up lo $22 
hourly' Call (800)280-01 77 
now lor more information 

NOW HIRING three interns 
uter Open to all ma 
lors Gain career skills Ac- 
counting, public relations 
marketing, communication 
travel, average earns $700/ 
waek Call (7B5I3 17-0455 

NOW HIRING Visla Onve 
In, a locally owned and op- 
erated quick service reatau 
rent is adding to Our team 
Individuals must have a pos- 
itive attitude and be able to 
multitask and work well with 
others in a last paced envi- 
ronment We have multiple 
part-time and a tew tuli-iirr* 
positions available, must be 
able to work during the day 
KSU students encouraged 
We offer meal discounts. 
Ilexible hours and promote 
from within Apply in parson 
al 1911 Ti. tlk. Creek Blvd 

SUMMER POSITION Look 
ing tor a responsible individ- 
ual to watch our Hire* chll 
dren at our home beginning 
June 1 Monday- Friday 
8 30- 5:30 Ages are 4. 8. 
10 References required 
Please call Kevin at (785) 
584-1607 

SUMMER KITCHEN help 
needed Please apply at 
Kite's Bar and Gnll 615 N 
12th Street, in Aggievlle 



3101 



Help Wanted 

PART-TIME COMMUMCA 
TIONS Assistant needed to 
work 10-15 hours par week 
This position will be respon- 
sible lor helping Comrnuni- 
calions. Manager to imple- 
ment (he communication 
strategy Ol the organization 
Candidate musl possess ex- 
cellent comm-i 
ganiialron. clerical and com- 
puter skids Website lech- 
notogy experience a plus 
Candidate must be raVraaat 
wilh a Macintosh, using 
Qua'k and Photoshop as 
well ax Microsoft Office ap- 
plications Send or deliver 
resume with (wo profess*) 
nai reierences to Manhattan 
Area Chamber 01 

Ailention Oena HuH 
501 Poynl* Ave Manhat- 
tan. KS 66502. $6 50/ hour 
Resume deadline May 6 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 

Inc. has a part-irma position 
for a Macintosh technician 
available Immediately Tna 
tech support team maintains 
about 50 Macintosh work- 
providing software 
support as well as perform- 
ing general hardware mam 
tenance Applicants stu mid 
have some experience wilh 
Mac OSX server and be la- 
miliar wilh design software 
such as Adobe Photoshop 
Adobe InDesign and Quark 
Express Any experience 
wilh networking, program- 
ming or with LINIX/Lintu is 
also herplul Pay ft 
$7 50 per hour wilh the op- 
portunity lo advance Only 
Students currently enrolled 
in spring 2005 lot al least 
Six hours al Kansas State 
University can be consid 
ered You are strongly en 
oouraged to contact Michael 
Yops at (785)532-0733 or 
stop by Kedzte 1 1 5 lor more 
information about the posi- 
tion Applications may be 
picked up in Kadzte 113 or 
115 or online at 
tyttpLtfapub kau.edu/lBch/an 
piicaiion ttttal Pti e n ■" 
elude your current class 
schedule 




3101 



Help Wanted 

SUMMER INTERNSHIP 
ALTERNATIVE MOVER 

Covan World-Wide Moving 
is looking lor college stu- 
dents lor summer work Ex- 
cellent opportunity to stay in 
RHrfl bf summer slay in 
shape, and save some cash 
or if you need an mlernship 
alternative Or summer em- 
ploymanl Helpers anil 
packers to perlorm packing 
and loading ol household 
good to our milil.i 
commercial customers No 
CDL required. Apply as 
soon as possible a' 
ttlh Street en PM 
Blvd Very competitive $? 50 
to $8 00 hourly incentive 
wages Job begins immedi- 
ately following spnng linals 
week through summer 
Equal Opportunity Employ- 



3301 



Business 

Opportunities 

The Collegian cannot veri- 
fy th* financial potential of 
advert i**n>*nt» In ihe Em- 
ployment/Career classifi- 
cation. Reader* are ad- 
vised to approach any 
such business opportuni- 
ty with reasonable cau- 
tion. Th* Collegian urge* 
our reader* to contact th* 
Belter Business Bureau. 
501 SE J*ff*raon. Topeka, 
KS 66607-1 190. (785)232 
0454 

400 

op en 
maai-ttejt 

4101 



Hems for Sale 



1101 Pot ii i M i'H> prop 

arty TVs PCs, DVD Play- 
ers, and more from $101 For 
more information (800|366- 
0307 ex1 M670 

FOR SALE Pool table CaH 
(785)423-3710 

GOVERNMENT SURPLUS 
lieid gear, boots, camou- 
flage clothing, much mora 1 
Also Cam am Workwaaf 
Open Monday- Friday 
9am- 5 30pm. Saturday 
9a m - 4p m St Mary's Sur- 
plus Sales, St. Mary's, KS 
(785)437-2734 



4151 

Furniture to 

Buy/Sell 

TWIN MATTRESS lor sal* 
Aim matching bed Ira me 
iser Call (785)317 
2232 

4351 



Computers 

COMPUTERS REPAIRED 
and data saved Viruses and 
spywef) removed lo en- 
hance speed and r i 
Fast and reliable service 
Call Lair Gauche, 1123 
Westlcop (7n5)776 

450 I 



Pets and 

Supplies 

MOVINGi FREE lour yoar 
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Page 10 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Monday, May 2, 2005 




MEDIA I Audience participates 



Chris H«n»wintk«i | (Oil I mn 
Curtis Muk. sen ioi In bio rtwmiitry, il**ps on i touch before midnight Friday, Mkk wid 
other students found different wjyt to o*t rest and swy warm during the cok) night. 



RELAY | Cold weather prompts 
early end to $12,000 fundraiser 



Continued from Page 1 

warm, there were activities for 
participants, even when they 
weren't one of the members of 
their teams walking around the 
track There was a dodgeball 
tournament, tug of war and in- 
dividual games of frisbee, soccer 
and football. 

At least one member from 
each team was required to be on 
the track at all times The con- 
tinuous walk symbolizes the re- 
fusal to stop the fight against 
cancer and the ongoing search 
for a cure for the disease 



Huerter walked 66 laps 
around the track, or about 16 
miles, throughout the night. 

"It's a fun way to gel in 
volved in the community by 
raising money and being able to 
share time with your friends 
that is all for a good cause," he 
said 

Fur many, this was their first 
time participating in Relay for 
Life at K Stale 

"This was my first one, and 
now I'll know what to expect 
for next year," Nordstrom said 
"Everyone I saw seemed to have 
a pretty good time." 



kstatecolleqian.com 



Continued from Page 1 

national news," she said. 
"There is little to no informa- 
tion about international pott- 
tics and issues. People need 
that exposure." 

The panel also included 
Fred Brock, assistant professor 
of journalism and former re- 
porter for the New York Times; 
Chris Olsen, producer and host 
of the Purple Power Hour; 
Sarah Rice, editor-in-chief of 
the Kansas State Collegian; 
and Erin Stattery, chairwoman 
of the Student Publications 
Inc., Board of Directors. 

The public's input was an 



important part of the panel dis 
cussion 

The event featured a ques- 
tion-and-answer session with 
the audience and encouraged 
written suggestions concerning 
diversity instruction and cover- 
age for local media outlets. 

Windi Singers, sophomore 
in social science and multicul- 
tural assistant at Moore Hall, 
said she enjoyed the panel dis- 
cussion. 

"I thought it was great," 
Singers said "They brought in 
a diverse group from many dif- 
ferent kinds of media. It 
opened up all kinds of points 
of view." 



HALE I Suggestions welcomed 



GAME | Webb steps in for Meier, 
other positions up for grabs 



Continued from Page 6 

on 16 carries 

"I thought there were 
times that he (Clayton) ran 
extremely hard, got his pads 
down, gut underneath tack- 
lers and kept his feet moving, 
and he did that more often 
than not," Snyder said. "But 
there were still some times 
where he ran with his pads a 
little higher than they should 
have been, stopped his feet 
on contact and didn't get the 



extra yard." 

Redshirt freshman Parrish 
Fisher, did not play due to in- 
jury. 

Overall, Snyder said the 
offense - and the defense - 
improved throughout the 
spring, as the Wildcats try to 
rebound from a 4-7 season in 
2004 

"1 don't feel bad, let me 
put it that way.' Snyder said 
"Are we where I want us to 
be' No. I think we've made 
progress" 



WHITE COAT | Vet Med 

students begin final, hands-on year 



Continued from Page 1 

headphones so that only they 
can hear them 

Students who need to use 
their cell phones should do so 
cither on the second floor or on 
the third floor landing of the 
southeast stairwell. 

If someone in the library is 
making too much noise, Reams 
said the studefits should let 
them know, and if they don't re- 
spond, library staff will be avail- 
able to enforce the quiet zones. 

This is the second semester 
the quiet zones have been used 
during finals week in the libra rv 
as part of an experiment to see 
how students want the library's 
study areas to be organized 

"We have the box in the li 
brary where people can drop off 



comments, and we got com- 
ments about how it can be hard 
to study, so we are trying to ad- 
dress this problem," Reams 
said. 

Students are encouraged to 
rill nut surveys that will be lo- 
cated throughout the library so 
a more permanent solution can 
be found 

"We are taking a very serious 
look at those surveys as we try 
to find a more permanent solu- 
tion," Reams said. 

Li ttri'll said the service is for 
the students. 

The whole reason for this is 
in response to sludents' re- 
quests, and wc really want to 
know what students want, so 
we realty thank the students for 
bringing this to our attention," 
Littrell said 



DEFENSIVE I Team comes 

together, several register tackles 



Continued from Page 1 

Students will be training in ei- 
ther small animal, equine or 
food animal practices, he said 
)uan Col' mi received his white 
coat after only three years at K 



State in veterinary medicine, but 
also four years at the University 
of Florida studying animal sci- 
ence. Colom said one of his 
goals after graduation He said 
he is looking forward to begin- 
ning his fourth year. 



Continued .from Page 6 

"We developed a good work 
habit. We are definitely start- 
ing new next year It may not 
be consistent right now - we 
definitely need some more 
work - but 1 think our guys 
are coming out and showing a 
lot more spirit than last year" 

Although the two defenses 
allowed 499 total yards of of- 
fense, including 150 yards 
through the air by Webb and 
redshirt freshman quarter- 
back Allan Evridge, Snyder 
said he was pleased with the 
secondary and defensive 
front 

"I thought we covered bel- 
ter, because there was a tot of 
scrambling by quarterbacks. 



CVET IN HERE! 



532-6560 



and I thought our four-man 
pass rush improved today," 
Snyder said 

Senior linebacker Ted Sims 
said the defense knows what 
it need to work on before the 
regular season starts, 

"I think we're coming to- 
gether as a team, and we work 
hard together," Sims said 



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Sub Exp Date 
|P| Kansas State Historical Society 

Newspaper Section 
A PO Box 3565 
, , Topeka KS 66601 

country this summer 
ta0t! 




www.kstaUtollcgun.tnni 



Tuesday, May X 2005 



\..| |(N,N.v 155 



Memorial 

scheduled 

for professor 



By Sarah Rice 

KANSAS S1A1EC01LEGIAN 

Friends and family will mourn the loss of 
distinguished architecture professor fames 
Dubois at a memorial service today 

The service will be at 5 
p.m in the K-State Student 
Union Little Theater 

Dubois, former professor 
of interior architecture, 
died April 10 after a short 
battle with pulmonary fi- 
brosis, a lung disease. 

Dubois graduated from 
K State in 1978. earning 
both his bachelor's and 
master's degrees in architec- 
ture. He spent the last 20 
years teaching at K-Slate 
and achieved the status of 
full professor 

During his tenure, Dubois 
served on more than 25 
committees, wrote and re- 
ceived more than 50 com- 
munity service grants and 
was beginning his fifth term imtwim ahomtktuk 
on Faculty Senate 

Dubois restored many historic buildings 
in Kansas Among his most notable projects 
are the | ay hawk State Theatre and the Union 
Pacific Station In 1998, I it won the Gover- 
nor's Award for Historic Preservation for 
Community Service and Preservation Educa- 
tion. 

"Jim was a very strong individual, very 
disciplined and very focused and when this 
|disease| started to affect the family, he start- 
ed helping everyone by telling them not to 
worry,'' Stephen Murphy, department head 
of interior architecture, said shortly after 
Dubois' death "I know hell be greatly 
missed by all of us" 



If you go 

Memorial 

service 

When: 3 p.m. today 
Where: Union Little 
Theater 




Dubois 

FOfflWRMOIESWRQI 



Seniors need 

to pay fines, buy 

cap and gown 



By Sarah Rk* 

KANSAS StAItCOlUGlAN 

In the last days of the semester, seniors need 
to take care of financial and academic obliga- 
tions to ensure they get their diplomas on time 

The Si 5 graduation fee needs to be paid to 
the Office of the Registrar and all parking, li- 
brary and telecommunications fines should be 
paid to their respective offices. University keys 
must be returned to Dykstra Hall. 

"All fees will have to be paid before they can 
release the diploma," [aimic Hays of the Col- 
lege of Arts and Sciences said 

Caps, gown and tassels are available for 
purchase at Vamey's Book Store and the 
K- St ate Student Union Book Store through 
May 13 Total cost with tax is $37.54 

Diplomas will be mailed four to six weeks 
after graduation For August graduates, diplo- 
mas will arrive in mid-September 

Graduating seniors also need to remember 
to ensure all transfer work has been sent to the 
Office of Admissions by |une 3 

More than 2,700 students will be graduating 
from K- State this spring in the 138th graduat- 
ing class. 

There will be 2,240 bachelor's, 350 master's, 
55 doctorates, 108 doctor of veterinary medi- 
cine and 72 associate degrees awarded in cere- 
monies on May 7, 13 and 14 

Among the speakers will be Gen Richard 
Myers, who will speak at the College of Engi- 
neering commencement 

A buffet lunch will be served from 10 am 
to 2 p.m. on May 14 in the K-State Student 
Union Ballroom. 

Tickets are $14.95 for adults and $4.95 for 
children Reservations must be made by May 
10 by calling 532-6068 



Century of learning 




KANSAS SIA'I HI, . 



When the program tint started, students In the veterinary medicine program worked on large agricultural animals. Today it has advanced to working on agricultural mhimIv pets and rxotic spears. 



College of Veterinary Medicine 
to celebrate 100 years of teaching 



By KritUn Roderick 

KANSAS STATE CQUEGIAN 

The College of Veterinary Medi- 
cine is turning 100, To honor its 
centennial, the sixth -oldest vet- 
erinary medicine college in the Unit 
ed States is having a celebration June 
4-8. 

"I hope people who come see how 
much it's grown and how diverse it 
is, Linda (ohnson. director of the in- 
structional technology center, said 
"We've come a long way in 100 years, 
from seven students to where we are 
now" 

The celebration will feature speak- 
ers who have graduated from the col- 
lege, a tour of the Sunset Zoo and 
displays showing the history of the 
College of Veterinary Medicine It 
will go with K-State's 67th annual 
conference for veterinarians. 

To commemorate the event, Ron- 
nie Elmore, associate dean of the 
College of Veterinary Medicine, and 
Howard Erickson, professor of physi- 
ology in the college, compiled a com- 
plete history of the college with pho- 
tos and facts 

They put the history into a leather- 
bound book and titled it "A Century 
of Excellence" 



For more information 

Visrt the 1 00- year celebration Web site at 
t<ttp://www vet.kw. edu/fenteniiHil/mdex.htm. 

HISTORY OF K-STATE 
VETERINARY MEDICINE 

Since the college began in 1905. 
more than 6.000 students have gotten 
their degrees in veterinary medicine 
at K- State- 
According to the college's Web 
site, animal health courses were first 
offered to K- Slate students in 1886 

Even so. it did not officially offer a 
doctoral degree in veterinary medi- 
cine until 1905 Seven men were I he- 
first to graduate from the college in 
1907 

The college was part of the De 
parlment of Agricultural until 1^4 3 
and students were trained in taking 
care of agricultural animals 

The first building in the College of 
Veterinary Medicine was in Old Ma- 
chinery Hall 

II was the first building built on 
the K-State campus," Elmore Mid 
"The first classes were there and it 
looked like a small clinic. I've seen 
pictures of it and it looks like a 

Set VH MED Page 10 




LindieyBauman|<ii|i[blAN 
Participants in the K-State College of Veterinary Medicine loth Anniversary Oag-N 
Jog leave the starting gat* and head south on Denison Avenue on April 30 




Drew Am* I GOU EUAN 
Kim Rainwater, second year vel med student, and Kristi Snyder, first year vet med 
student both respond to a question that was answered Incorrectly during the gun 
howl at Trotter Hall on f rlday morning 



Marriage amendment questions companies' rights 



By Artgi* Hanson 

KANSAS STATE EOUtOAH 

On April 5, Kansas residents voted 
to implement a marriage amendment 
into the Kansas Constitution, ensuring 
marriage be acknowledged solely as a 
union between a man and a woman, 
thus eliminating the possibility of 
recognition of homosexual marriages, 
domestic partnerships and civil 
unions. 

Some controversy has arisen in re- 
gards to the wording of Clause B, 



which stales, No relationship, other 
than a marriage, shall be recognized 
by the state as entitling the parties to 
the right.* i ir incidents of marriage" 

The new issue at hand - who does 
Clause B affect? 

Kent Cormack, pastor at the Firsl 
Congregational United Church of 
Christ in Manhattan, said the amend- 
ment threatens everyone who lives in 
Kansas - homosexuals and heterosex- 
uals 

"The most disturbing aspect with 
this amendment is that the Kansas 



Constitution was formed to i 
peoples' rights," Cormack said Tins 
amendment curtails peoples rights 
and discriminates against certain pen 
pie" 

Tlie controversy stemming from 
the wording of the amendment is that 
it calls into question the rights of pri 
vale companies In niter domestic part- 
ner benefits to those not bound in het 
erosexual matrimony, Cormack said 
Thus, the amendment could pnlential 
ly ignite legal action between compa 
nies and the stale of Kansas 



"This amendment alteeis more 
people than hom<>se\ti.ds, is what 
people don't understand," Cormack 
said "Nobody knows how the courts 
are going to interpret this amend- 
ment" 

Cormack learned with the Flint 
Hills Human Rights Project, a group 
aligned wWi the nationwide Human 
Rights Campaign, prior to rating on 
April 5, to inform the Manhattan com 
inunily i>f the dangers of the 

See AMENDMENT Page 10 



Today 



o 



High 65 
Low 41 



Wednesday 

High 71 
4fe Low 45 





NEWS HIGHLIGHTS 


DON'T F0RGI 


Iraqi influx of deaths 


Kansas governor race 


Weapons dump kills 28 


■ Brian Williams of 


"Peru Design/Build Inca 


Iraq's Incoming prime minister strut} 


Four prominent Republican pollti 


A warlord's secret arms cache 


NBC Nightly News 


Atthltecture Re -inter- 


gled to find a Sunn! Arab to run the 


clans said Monday that they're inter- 


exploded in a remote Afghan village 


presents the With 


preted" at the Kamada Inn 


key Defense Ministry In time to join 


ested in seeking the patty's nomlna 


Monday, flattening nearby houses 


Landon Lecture at 


Ballroom 


Iraq's rlrsl democratically elected 


tkw for governor The four were State 


and a mosque and killing at least 28 


9.30 am. today In McCain 




government when it takes office 
Tuesday 


Treasurer Lynn Jenkins, Secretary of 


people in what appeared to be the 


Auditorium 


■ There are free ice 


State Ron Thornburgh, Senate 


deadliest accident of its kind since 




cream cones in the 




Majority Leader Derek Schmidt and 


the ouster of the Taliban regime. 


■ The Vernon Larson 


Linton Courtyard from 


SlMy.hael 


House Speaker Doug Mays 




lecture senes continues 


lla.m to2p.m. 








at U: JO p.m today with 


Wednesday 



K 



> 






• 



Page 2 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Tuesday, May 3, 2005 




Puzzles | Eugene Sheffer 



ACROSS 

1 Overly 

theatrical 

6 Sofldffy 

6 Accumu- 
lation 

12 Lotion 
•dcttllv* 

19 Emana- 
tion 

14 Say 
confl- 
ttently 

16 Unim- 
provable 
■pot 

IT The 
Amazing 

__ m 

18 Chan 
type 

19 insepa- 
rable 

M Pulls 
hard 

21 Space 
craft com- 
partment 

22 Erstwhile 
acorn 

23 Truman's 
birthplace 

26 Record 
holder? 

30 Finished 

31 Lustrous 
black 

32 Roches- 
ter's love 

33 Grail 
seeker 

35 Lieu 



30 Ernie 
Banks, 
notably 

3TPOS- 



33 frivo- 
lous 

41 Moon- 
shine 
container 

42 Calendar 
abbr 

45 Birthright 
barterer 

46 Lover 

43 Move 
like a 
butterfly 

49 Melody 

50 Wheel- 
base 
terminus 

51 Far 
(pre*) 

52 Crafty 

53 Turns 
I lurf 



DOWN 

1 Dog- 
patch'a 

"founder" 

2 Jal 
toltower 

3 Oliver 
Twist's 
request 

4 Shell 
game 



5 Putvert/a 
S Relax- 
ation 

7 Caustic 
solution 

8 Pel shop 
birds 

9 Terrible 
guy? 

10 Tress 

11 Lambs' 
dams 

16 "Lei's 
Make a 
Deal* 
Option 

Solution lima: 21 mint. 



codh aaa bdoq 
□bob nan aona 



BBBO ODU UUUU 

pHnno aaaaaaD 



toanH [iua ortnu 
□□□a qqd aaa 



YMtirdsy't 



S3 



20 Tie up the 
phone 

21 Airdrop 

22 No longer 
Chic 

23 Journal 

24 Ms 
Gardner 

25 Gibson or 
TlHls 

26 Clampett 
patriarch 

27-Seeyar 

28 — pro 
nobis 

29 Taken 
out of 
context'' 

31 Pugilistic 
ploy 

34 -Survivor* 
structure 

35 Long 
Story 

37 Gel a 
move on 

MGota 
move on 

39 Spot on 
the map 

40 Track star 
Devers 

41 "Monopo- 
ly" comer 

42 See 52- 
Across 

43 Hold the 
scepter 

44 Enrages 
48 Hell the 

parents 
47 Frenzied 



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Yesterday*! Cryptoquip: MY FAMILY 
OSTEOPATH REALLY UKES TO KID AROUND 
HE'S FOND OF PULLING PEOPLES' LEGS 
Today's Cryptnquip Clue G equals R 

\CPYPTOOOIPBOOK2l Sand U.X (cft«Wm a } k> 
CryptoCtMBKS Book 2, HO. Bon 5354TS, OHwdo, R 



The Crypto**; is a tubsSMon apher in whicri an* MHr sank lor 
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(uatm SmgM Man, »hort wonji md won* ueXto sn »pc*trof*w 
gnm you duai to tocasng man** SoMton a by tw and mtr. 
e S0O5 oy King Faaturw SyndtcaM. tnc 



STREET TALK 

WHAT ARE YOU GOING TO DO AFTER YOUR LAST FINAL? 




Sornson 




Maze 




Pierce 




Schuster 




*! only have one test, but we 
have projem due at 6 next 
Friday and welt be at 
Agglevllle at about 6:15," 

llll Sornson 

fimmaiNAMHiiKTuRt 




Kyrter 



Tm going to leave to go to 
Colorado with my family for a 
quick vacation before I start 
working." 

Kelly Man 

SOPHOMCWJ IN PRf. NURSING 




Galyon 



I'm going home, back In 
Texas. Hopefully I'll be packed 
up by Thursday and be on the 
road right after finals" 

Kenneth Pierce 

FRESHMAN IN PRE -MLB AND 
MKROBKHOGY 



"I'm going to be drinking and 
playing poker probably" 

Nick Schuster 

SiNtOR IN (DuCMIQN 



Noll 



"Celebrating graduation and 
drinking with fronds ' 

Tara Schuster 

StMOR IN tlf MtNIARV (DUCAnON 



"Start studying for next 
semester. I f m going to go to 
Vamey's to buy textbooks and 
start studying.* 

/ared Kyner 

SENiOR IN HUMAN NUTRITION 



"Heading down to Aggievllle " 

Eric Galyon 

STHYEARtN 
ARCHfTEaURAE ENGINEERING 




'Nothing fun, just taking 
summer classes" 

LeTeya Farrts 

GRAOUAIESTUOtNllNmt.Ltfjf 
StUDENTPERSONNEl 




"I'm going to Florida for my 
sister-in-law's bachelorette 
party," 

Jeitlca Noll 

SfJBOIteiElEMENTARYEniKATiON 




"Going to a Royals game" 

Michelle Maiur 

S0RH0M0RE IN ANIMAL tflENCES 
AND INOUSTRT 



Schuster 



Maiur 



The blotter | Arrests in Riley County 



I are taken directly 
from Riley County Police 
Department's dally logs. The 
Collegian does not list wheel 
locks or minor traffic viol* 
tlons because of space, 
constraints. 

Friday, April 29 

■ At 4 p.m, Adam Williams. 
1215ThuntonSt,No, l.was 
arrested for worthless check. 
Bond was set at $28128 

■ At 4:45 p.m., Nicholas 
Duncan, 1224 Pomeroy Si, No 
2, was arrested for failure to 
appear. Bond was set at $750 

■ At 7:30 p m,. latonto Fain, 
Junction City, Kan, was 
arrested for driving on a 
suspended license. Bond was 
set at SI, 000. 

Saturday, April 30 

■ At 1:28 a.m., Kami Llnnens, 
St. George, Kan , was arrested 
for DDL Bond was set at $750 

■ At 2:20 a.m., Michael 
Lawrence Jr., Lawrence, was 
arrested for driving on a 
suspended license and DUI. 
Bond was set at SUSO 

■ At 9:30 am, Daniel Siebert, 
2413 Hlmes Road, was arrested 



for failure to appear. Bond was 
set it $1,500. 

■ At 7 15 p.m., Jose Gonzales, 
14l0Hartmanr1ace,Na19, 
was arrested for DUI. Bond was 
set at $750. 

■ At 9-SS p.m., Paul Senatore. 
1632 McCain Lane, was 
arrested for DUI. Bond was set 
at $750. 

■ At 11 :48 p.m.. Mark Miller. 
Claftin, Kan., was arrested for 
consumption of alcohol and 
DUI. Bond was set at $750. 

Sunday, May 1 

■ At 12:30 a.m., Dane 
Slmonsen, 1900 filuestem 
Terrace, was arrested for failure 
to appear Bond was set at 
$139 

■ At 2:10 a.m., Zach Lowland, 
1101 N. 8th Si, was arrested 
for DUI. Bond was set at $750. 

■ At 351 am., Quinty 
Livingston, Liberal, Kan., was 
arrested for unlawful posses- 
sion of depressants. Bond was 
set at $750. 

■ At 6:10 p.m., Joanne 
Arceneaux, 723 Morn St., No. 2, 
was arrested fot falsely 
reporting a crime. Bond was 
set at $500 



The planner 

Campus bulletin board 



Campus Calendar Is the 
Collegian's campus bulletin 
board service. To place an 
item in the Campus Calendar, 
stop by Kedzie 1 1 6 or e-mail 
the news editor at 
builtlinsmpub.kiu.edu by 
1 1 i.m, two days before it Is 
to run. 

■ The Graduate School 
announces the final oral 
defense of the doctoral disser 
ration of Kevin Hooker at3 30 



p m. today in Durtand 2036. 

■ The Student Dletks 
Association meets at 5:30 
p.m. today in Annebetg Park. 
a There are free ke cream 
cones in the Union Courtyard 
from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. 
Wednesday. 

■ All 2005 graduates (May, 
August and December) are 
Invited to the Senior Send-off 
from 4 to 6 p.m. Thursday at 
the Alumni Center North 
Terrace 



Corrections and clarifications 

Corrections and clarifications appear in this space If you see 
something that should be corrected, call Hews Editor Kristi Hurta 
at $32-6556 or e mall collegien&ipub.ksutdu. 



Kansas State Collegian 

(USPS 291 020) The Kansas State Collegian, a student newspaper 
at Kansas State University, is published by Student Publications 
Inc., Kedzte 103, Manhattan, KS 66506 The Collegian is published 
weekdays during the school year and on Wednesdays dunng the 
summer. Periodical postage is paid at Manhattan, KS 66502. 
POSTMASTER: Send address changes 10 Kansas State Collegwn, 
circulation desk, Kedzie 103. Manhattan, KS 66506-7167 

O Kansas State Collegian, 2005 



oNCNOWNASUqc 

^ BODY FIRST ™ 
23oa AMHon *» r?M| atT-aiea 



/ quality resume 
papers 

C/ar/t/l JJogA* and Cytfi 





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Kagei 



Fraternity members to bike 4,000 miles for charity 



By Lacey O. Meckey 

KANSAS MUCOlLfaAN 

Steve Stampbach didn't 
know how to change a bicycle 
chain - until he found out he 
would be riding across Che 
country this summer on two 
wheels, 

Stampbach, senior in com- 
puter science, will join a group 
of Pi Kappa Phi fraternity mem- 
bers on fune 6 to ride almost 
4,000 miles across the country. 

Journey of Hope, sponsored 
by the non-profit organization 
Push America, is a cross -county 
bicycle trek from San Francisco 
to Washington, D.C 

Each year, Journey of Hope 
participants raise $350,000 to 
$400,000 exclusively to help 
people with disabilities 

Pi Kap organized this pro- 
gram in 1988, and K-Stales 
chapter tries lo send one man to 
participate in the event each 
year. 

"The guys in my house who 



have done it before have said, 
'Just do it There's no other time 
in your life you can do this,'" 
Stampbach said. 

The event includes three 
teams with about 35 Pi Kaps in 
each route, including north, 
south and trans- America trips 

Stampbach said he hopes to 
join the northern route, which 
will cut through Utah, Colorado, 
Iowa and Michigan. Riders will 
spend 63 days on the road, bik- 
ing about 75 miles a day. 

While mornings will start 
early, Stampbach said partici- 
pants spend evenings with some 
of the kids they have raised 
money to support. 

"One professor asked me, 
'Why do the cycling and not just 
give the money to the kids?'" 
Stampbach said "But that way 
you don't get the interaction 
with the kids. There needs lo be 
that human contact." 

Tim Lindemuth, former ad- 
viser of Pi Kap and editor of the 
K- Stater Magazine, said Journey 



For more information 

To support Journey of Hope, donations tan 
be sent to Steve Stampbach, 1614 
Fairchtld, Manhattan, KS, 66S06 
Make ail checks payable to Push America, 
Questions? Call Stew at 3-11 -3429 or 
e-mail him at ifn8888pk-rtate.edu. 

of Hope creates a tangible pay- 
back for communities as well as 
participants. 

"On a personal level, the stu- 
dents bring something very, very 
special to the people," Linde- 
muth said. "We have guys who 
will ride for 100 miles in a day, 
take a quick shower and then 
interact with people until 8:30 
in the evening. They just have an 
energy and a love for doing this." 

As a veteran athlete, Stamp- 
bach said he isn't worried about 
the biking as much as the fund 
raising. 

"My biggest concern is fund 
raising," Stampbach said. "Any- 
one who wants to help me is 
sensational" 

After fund-raising for only 



four to six weeks, Stampbach 
has acquired almost $ 1 ,800, but 
is still short of the $5,000 he 
needs. 

Receiving significant support 
from friends, family and some 
area businesses, Stampbach said 
financial support is only one 
way people can help. 

"Fund raising is a part of it, 
but send me an e-mail for en- 
couragement, too," he said "1 
need motivation as well as fund 
raising." 

Stampbach and the rest of 
the Journey of Hope partici- 
pants start their cross-country 
adventure on June 6, but there's 
sail a lot to be done before then. 

For a guy who didn't know 
how to change the chain on his 
bike recently, Stampbach has 
more important things to think 
about for his trek, including bik- 
ing over those "ridiculously tall 
mountains." 

"A comfortable seat, that's 
the most important thing," 
Stampbach said. 




Starting on Jura 6. 
Slew SUmptkKh, 
wfiioi In computer 
uiente, will join 
other members of 
Pi Kappa Phi a* 
they Mb MM the 
country for the 
Joumry of Hope 

Llndtcy Biuman 

uhih.iaim 



Jardine residents relocate 



ByAktxPeak 
KANSAS STATE COUtGIAN 

Phase one of the renovations 
at the Ji-rdine Apartment Com- 
plex will begin in a few weeks. 

The first part of the renovation 
project involves the demolition of 
buildings A, 13 and C, and the 
construction of new buildings 

"The new architecture wilt re- 
late to main campus," Stephanie 
Bannister, assistant director of 
apartment living for Housing and 
Dining, said "They will have the 
traditional limestone and tower 
aspects," she said 

"The buildings will be no taller 
than three stories and will have a 
variety of options for number of 
bedrooms and variations of floor 
plans" 

About 50 people have been re- 
located Many of the residents are 
graduating or have chosen to 
move somewhere else. 

"We gave the residents a sur- 
vey that offered several options 
for relation," Kelly Thacker, as- 
sistant coordinator and resident 
at Jardine, said "Many of the peo- 
ple have families and friends here 
and preferred to stay." 



Those who choose lo slay are 
relocated to other apartments in 
Jardine The residents were in- 
formed of the project in February 
and began transferring in March 
There were focus groups available 
in which residents could ask 
questions 

Residents were supplied with 
moving boxes, tape, water and gift 
certificates for local restaurants to 
help case the moving process, 
Thacker said. 

"We worked around their 
schedule for moving out and tried 
to help as much as we could," she 
said 

Upon completion of phase 
one, 736 new spaces will open 
and are expected to be available 
in fall 200? After the first phase, 
the next step will be remodeling 
the existing buildings 

"We want to have a lot of op- 
tions available at all different 
prices," Bannister said. 

"II is our ultimate plan to pro- 
vide, when we're done with the 
redevelopment plans, an opportu- 
nity to house K- State students 
and constituents like none other, 
Pat Bosco, dean of student life, 
said. 



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Drop policy suggestions considered 



By Ben Spkcr 
KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 

The K-State drop policy 
next fall will have not only a 
new name, but also possibly 
changes to the way the policy 
is administered 

Originally a student who 
did not attend the first day of 
class could be dropped by the 
instructor. 

The student body president, 
the Drop Policy Committee 
and the Faculty Senate presi- 
dent have made a new recom- 
mendation regarding how the 
drop policy is enforced. 

The suggested guidelines 
include changing the title of 
the policy from "drop policy" 
to "attendance policy" as well 
as acknowledging the original 
intent of the policy as provid- 
ing students access to closed 
classes as early in the semester 
as possible. 

Additionally, department 



heads will now include a con- 
tact person in the course 
schedule for situations in 
which the course instructor is 
listed as "staff," 

The contact person would 
then be responsible for relay- 
ing information to the instruc- 
tor 

The attendance policy will 
also be disseminated more 
widely - at orientation ses- 
sions for freshmen, through 
advisers and through e-mail 
messages. 

Hayley Urkevich, former 
student body president, said 
the drop policy passed by Fac- 
ulty Senate in spring 2004 
could potentially have a nega- 
tive impact on students. 

"Members of both Faculty 
Senate and Student Senate 
agreed that it was not neces- 
sarily the policy in and of itself 
that needed to be changed, but 
rather that the policy should 
be administered in such a way 



to avoid negative ramifica- 
tions," she said 

"Faculty Senate president 
Or (Jacqueline) Spears and 
myself worked together to for- 
mulate a set of suggestions for 
administrative guidelines to be 
implemented and presented to 
the provost" she said. 

This set of suggested guide- 
lines do just that, and as such 
do not have lo be enforced by 
an instructor However, Urke- 
vich said she fell good about 
the suggestions. 

"The guidelines should 
allow faculty to meet the goals 
of the policy while not unfair 
ly disadvantaging students 
The Provost was extremely re 
tt'ptive to these guidelines. I 
have no reason to think that 
they will not be implemented 
to the best ol his anility," she 
said 

Spears said the position 
taken by student leaders was 
(hat the information on the 




policy was not widely distrib- 
uted, and that students saw 
the original policy as punitive 

"The intent of the policy as 
originally introduced was lo 
provide students access lo 
elosed classes in a timely fash 
ion," Spears said "Clearly, 
lhat benefits students who 
need the class and are pre- 
pared to attend the first day 
Some student leaders saw the 
policy as punitive lo those mu 
dents who enrolled in the 
class and did mil attend the 
first day 

Spears said the faculty see 
the policy as helpful in com- 
municating lo students the im- 
portance of attendance and 
personal responsibility 

"Discussion -intensive il.iss 
es require an opening session 
in which members of (he class 
introduce themselves. When 
students do not attend the first 
day of class, this process has 
to be repealed," she (aid 



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tan 



Page 4 

TO THE POINT 

Drop policy 

guidelines 

should be rules 

The drop policy is getting better, but it's 
still not fixed. 

University officials, including Faculty 
Senate and the student 
body president, have 
taken logical steps to 
improve a potentially 
broken system. 

The new guidelines 
suggest teachers drop 
students who miss the 
first day of class only if 
there is a waiting list 

While most instruc- 
tors probably have 
been reasonable in 
utilizing their 
newfound authority to 
drop students who miss 
the first class, the guidelines show that 
Faculty Senate is not out of touch with 
students. 

But the guidelines need to become 
regulations. Without the support of 
distinct rules, students still are at risk of 
being unfairly dropped from a class. 

If students miss the first day of a class, 
even with a valid excuse and no waiting 
list, the instructor could drop them. 

While most of the faculty would not 
resort to such illogical tactics, even the 
potential for such injustice should be 
enough to make the new guidelines the 
regulations. Teachers should have control 
in their classrooms, but it's also important 
to ensure students are protected by 
reasonable regulations. 

The new guidelines are good, They 
should be the new rules. The faculty is a 
vital part of this institution, but should be 
here to help serve the students. 

Instructors and students should push 
the university to ensure the new guide- 
lines become the standards 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Tuesday, May 3, 2005 



To the point at 
editorial selected and 

debated by the editorial 
board and written after a 
majority opinion is 
formed This is the Colle- 
gian's official opinion 

Abble Adams 
Michael Ashford 
Johanna Barnes 
Ryan C. Ftynn 
Man Girard 
James Hurla 
Kristi Hurl* 
Jesse Manning 
Sarah Rice 
Joanna ftubkk 
Lcann Sulzcn 
8HI Wall 
LonlWoolcry 



WRITE TO US 

The Collegian welcomes your linen to the editor. They can be 
submitted by e-mail to kttermpvb teu.rdu, or In person to 
tCediie 1 16. Please include your full name, year in school and 
major, letters should be limited to 2S0 words. All submitted 
letters may be edited fat le ngth and clarity. 



I 



KANSAS STATE 

COLLEGIAN 





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Otapby ads. S32-6560 OHhwy proWeim 532-6555 



Free will 



Science, religion finally agree: DNA, God control peoples choices 




KODY COOPER 



You don't really believe 
you have a free will, do you? 

You think you are reading 
this of your 
own accord? 
Do you not 
know that Sci- 
ence and Reli- 
gion have 
proven 
that man 
has no 
freewill? 

t was skeptical of Science 
at first, but he promised that 
if I listened, he wouldn't cut 
off electron flow to my TV so 
I could keep getting my 
weekday afternoon fix of 
Sponge Bob The thought of 
missing even one episode 
scared me into submission 

So Science introduced mc 
to the theory of biological 
determinism. It argues that 
all human activity can be 
traced to its most rudimenta- 
ry level: all human thought 
and activity is basically just 
chemical reactions dictated 
by our DNA. 

I was perplexed. 

"Science, do you mean 
that 1 didn't actually choose 
my DNA-coded genes that 
make me enjoy Sponge Bob's 
high- pitched giggling'! 1 " 

In fact, my genes deter- 
mined every choice 1 ever 
made. Science also pointed 
out that 1 didn't choose what 
genes were given to me. I 
couldn't remember picking 
out my chromosome pairs 
at the Prenatal Depart- 
ment Store. 

"But Science," 1 
protested, "doesn't our en- 
vironment play a role? What 
if I'd been bom in |esusland, 
where Sponge Bob is a eu- 
phemism for Satan? Would I 
have been a Devil worship- 
per?" 

Science just stared at me 
Then it hit me I realized that 
ultimately I didn't choose my 
environment either, regard- 
less of how much of a role it 
plays. 

|ust then, Science's age- 
old arch nemesis, Religion, 
appeared out of thin air. He 
hovered above us in angelic 
fashion "Ha," Religion said. 
"Where's your precious law 
of gravity now, Science?" 

Science responded in 
tum. 

"Religion, you're just mad 
because I've proven that 
man actually evolved from 
apes'* 

Religion didn't back 
down 



"Is that still your excuse 
for why you never got a date 
to the prom, Science?" 

Science was upset. 

"Shut up, Religion. My 
DNA is 98 percent identical 
to a chimpanzee's My hairy 
back isn't my fault!" 

I could see this was going 
nowhere. Surely Religion 
would explain why we have 
a free will. 

"Religion," I began, "some 
backwater holy-rolling Bible- 
thumpers might have trouble 
believing Science What dt i 
you think about free will?" 

"Actually, Science and I 
agree on this one. You see, 
those who believe the Bible 
is the literal Word of God 
necessarily accept determin- 
ism as well, according to 
Psalm 139:16: 

""You saw me before I 
was bom Every day of my 
life was recorded in your 
book. Every moment 
was laid out before 
one came to pass"' 



I was awestruck So God has 
mapped out all our days be 
fore we are even bom? That 
sounded hard to accept 

Science interjected, "I 
sure am glad that President 
Kerry didn't quote from the 
Book of such close- minded, 
radical teaching in the town 
hall debate and effectively 
alienate his intellectual base; 
he might not have been 
elected. Wait . er never- 
mind." 

It seemed uncharacteristic 
for Science lo mix Religion 
with Politics, but I still won- 
dered why so many people 
believe they have a free will 
if Science and Religion prove 
mjii's fate is determined. 

Religion answered, 
"Man's mind can't compre- 



hend how a loving God 
could determine all things - 
good and evil - for His holy 
purpose. So man has con 
strutted free will to absolve 
God from responsibility of 
evil," 

"See," Science interrupt- 
ed, "how could a God inca- 
pable of evil determine such 
insanity as Kim Jong- Men tal- 
ly Il's nuclear program?" 

"Isn't it more comforting 
to know that God is in con- 
trol, no matter what hap- 
pens, though?" Re- 
ligion responded 



As I contemplated Sci- 
ence and Religion, I flipped 
over to the Saturday Morn- 
ing SpongeBob Marathon. I 
blame DNA and God. 



te&f Cooper b currently watching a 
SponorSob marathon, which consists 
(rf a VOt and a looping tap*. Please 
send your comments to 
apMM^Hhki **(. 




Referendums are important; campaign one-sided, shady 



rhkh was supported 

ft 

ili M 

SCOTT S£fl 



One week ago today, K- State stu- 
dents put the kibosh on the Center 
for Student Activities. 

The center, which was supported 
by fewer than 50 
percent of voting 
students, would 
provide new facili- 
ties for the Office 
of Student Ac- 
tivities, Greek 
Affairs and the 
Multicultural 

Student Office, as well as meeting, 
lounge and storage space for the 
more than 400 student organizations 
on campus 

Though less than SO percent was 
enough for George Bush, here at K 
State we have a much more stringent 
60 percent requirement on such ini- 
tiatives. 

The merits of this particular pro- 
posal aside, there is one thing that 
has stuck out in my mind as trouble- 
some 

I'm sure all of you got that e-mail 
bom our good friend Bill Harlan 
over at the OSAS headquarters last 
week encouraging you to vote. 

Or maybe you heard the commer - 



rials on 91 .9, 

Maybe when you were out in the 
■ Ville last Tuesday when you should 
have been studying, you saw Dean of 
Student Life Pat Bosco and other 
supporters of the referendum drown- 
ing their sorrows at Pat's. 

In this e-mail, and the "informa- 
tional" link contained within, OSAS 
and the university laid out the won- 
derful benefits of this new temple for 
student organizations. 

They were going to list the down 
sides, but they couldn't think of any. 

On this radio spot, played on a 
radio station that is prohibited from 



even listing prices of its sponsor's 
products on the air, we hear how 
passage of this referendum would be 
a great way to leave a "legacy of stu- 
dent-led initiatives." 

To make matters worse, members 
of the committee that came up with 
the proposal delivered the message. 

We see members of the adminis- 
tration like Bosco, who spoke to the 
Collegian of an "overwhelming" stu- 
dent concern for more space, pro- 
moting the idea publicly 

Is the Center for Student Activi- 
ties a good idea? Who knows? Cer- 
tainly not 1, because all I have seen is 




SGA OSAS and Anderson Hail's 
version of things 

Referendums are a crucial compo- 
nent of the democratic process. 

The reason referendums like this 
are required, and the reason they re- 
quire a 3/5 majority to pass, is that 
the needs of the student body as a 
whole are more important than the 
wants and needs of SGA OSAS, the 
Multicultural Student Office, Greek 
Affairs and the administration 

It's certainly acceptable for sup 
porters and proponents to make the« 
positions and the reasons for them 
known publicly That is one of the 
crucial components of a democracy 

However, those who stand to di- 
rectly gain from it, be it in the form 
of a new office or a line on a resume, 
should remain publicly neutral. 

Most of all, there should be no 
public comment on one side or the 
other from anyone whose office is lo- 
cated in Anderson Hall. 

Now that would be a student-led £ 
initiative. 



CAMPUS FOURUM | 395-4444 -or- fourum@spub.ksu.edu 



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Tuesday, May 3, 2005 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Pages 



Grant to fund new center on campus 



By Adam Hanks 

KANSAS STATFCOUEaAN 

A $992,000 grant should help 
preserve the memories and ex- 
periences of American soldiers 
jn the 20th century at K-State 

The grant, provided by the 
Department of Education, will 
help fund the new National 
Center for the Study of the 
American Soldier, Charles Rea- 
gan, associate to the president, 
said 

"This will be a center for his- 
torians who are writing the his- 
tories of individual soldiers and 
units," Reagan said 

The new center will be on the 



K State campus and is part of 
the KSU Institute for Military 
History and 20th Century Stud- 
ies 

The institute is designed to 
promote scholarship and learn- 
ing in 20th century studies 
through hosting conferences, 
funding research and bringing in 
speakers to the university, Mark 
Parillo, director of the institute 
and associate professor of histo- 
ry, said. 

"We are determined to fur- 
ther the history of the American 
soldier, in particular the Ameri- 
can soldier in the 20th century," 
he said. 

The grant will provide fund 



ing for four primary initiatives 
The first is to enable faculty to 
research and write the histories 
of American soldiers and units 

The center will also fund dis- 
sertation fellowships for gradu- 
ate students to conduct research 
using collections on K- State's 
campus, Eisenhower Presiden- 
tial Library, Truman Presidential 
Library, U.S. Army Command 
and General Staff College at Ft 
Leavenworth, and the National 
Military Archives Center in St. 
Louis. 

In addition to this, the grant 
will help to provide stipends for 
K- State undergraduates to serve 
as research assistants for faculty 



conducting research for the 
American Soldier project. 

Finally, uie grant will enable 
faculty and students working for 
the center to travel to academic 
conferences to present papers. 

"it will mean gathering some 
sources and data. It will be much 
more involved with supporting 
the work of historians and other 
writers who will be writing 
about the experience of the 
American soldier," Parillo said 
"We are ultimately supporting 
the publication of these works" 

K State was chosen to receive 
the grant due to the prestige of 
their military history program, 
Parillo said. 



Prescription drug abuse on the rise; FDA sets controls 



By J. Scott Bowman 

KANSAS StAfECOItKilAN 

Prescription drugs can help 
people who need them, or get the 
people who want them high. 

Ritalin. Adderall, Valium, Vi- 
codin and OxyConlin, the last 
also known as the "poor man's 
heroin," arc all prescription drugs 
that have been abused. 

Other than over-the-counter 
drugs, there are two main types of 
drugs that pharmacies deal with: 
ci tnlrolled and noncontrolled, Dr 
Charles Eiscnberg, director of the 



Mercy Health Center pharmacy, 
said 

Controlled drugs are dcsignal- 
ed by the Food and Drug Admin 
istratjon as having significant 
abuse potential, Eiscnberg said 

"There are five different sched- 
ules of controlled drugs that a 
pharmacy might see," he said 
"Schedule one we don't see, 
which would include heroin, be- 
cause there isn't a typical medical 
use 

"Schedule two includes mor- 
phine, which we use all the time, 
and cocaine, which has medical 



use in hospitals." 

Schedules three through five 
are still controlled, but less than 
the first two, Eisenberg said. He 
said with the first two schedules, 
prescriptions must be brought in, 
not faxed, and can't be refilled 

He said Ritalin is a schedule 
two, Vlcodin is a schedule three 
and Valium is a schedule four. 

There are programs on cam- 
pus that can help students who 
are abusing prescription drags, 
Aaron Carlstrom, therapist with 
the University Counseling Ser- 
vices, said. He said Counseling 



Services doesn't have drug and a) 
cohol counseling, but there are 
services available for individuals 
faced with drug abuse. 

"What we do is address issues 
of the substance abuse," Carl- 
strom said "We'll see if the abuse 
is linked with depression or anxi- 
ety. If things are more serious, 
we'll refer them for treatment in 
the community." 

Carlstrom said there is infor- 
mation for students interested in 
getting help at the Counseling 
Services Web site, 

www.ksu.edu /coun seling 



Tax increase to benefit Manhattan schools 



By Adr ianne DeWeese 
KANSAS SUIt CM I JOAN 

The quarter- cent sates tax in 
crease that passed April 5 will 
help support Manhattan 
schools. 

The increase goes into effect 
in October but the district will 
not see the proceeds until Janu- 
ary 

David Colbum, vice presi- 
dent of Manhattan Ogden USD 
183 school board, said the lax 
increase will allocate $900,000 
to the school district in the 
2005-2006 school year 

The increase is projected to 
raise $1 H million a year It has a 
three-year span with a maximum 



of $5 4 million collected 

Colbum said the sales tax in 
crease is a good thing for Man 
ha (tan schools 

"It allows the school board 
and the community to control its 
own destiny in terms of not hav 
ing to cut programs and not de- 
pend totally on state funding," he 
said 

The funds from the sales tax 
increase would also prepare 
Manhattan for an influx of sol- 
diers from Ft Riley. 

Michele Jones, director of 
public relations for USD 583, 
said the increase allows for flex- 
ibility in dealing with an influx 
of soldiers and their families. 

"We've got to make plans in 



hiring administration in prepara- 
tion for March when the stu- 
dents will be coming in The in 
crease gives us flexibility in 
having dollars available for 
when we arc ready to go," she 
said. 

Kansas legislators are work- 
ing on a school funding package 
which would add to the current 
$2.7 billion in annual state aid. 

Jones said the Kansas Legisla- 
ture has tentatively put the plan 
forward but the governor has 
not signed it 

On May 1 1 , the Kansas 
Supreme Court will hear addi- 
tional briefings for the case ac- 
cusing the state of failing to pay 
for an adequate education for 



students in the state of Kansas 

Lack of funding in USD 383 
in the past has led to closing 
Bluemont Elementary and Eu 
gene Field Elementary, and 
Theodore Roosevelt Elementary 
School will close after the 2005- 
2006 school year. 

Colbum said the intent is to 
not cut the Spanish programs 
and instrumental music pro- 
grams in elementary schools 

Roger Brannan, current 
school board member, said de- 
clining school enrollment neces- 
sitated the tax increase. 

"The declining enrollment is 
a senous issue in our communi- 
ty that patrons need to under- 
stand," he said 



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Lot Construction 



Parking Lot construction will occur in lot C-2, 
north of the Recreation Complex, starting in May. 

This lot, encompassing all parking between 
Denison Ave. on the east and the traffic circle on 

the West, will require alternate entry and parking 
over the course of the summer 

Please watch for more notices, check with the 

staff at Parking Services or the Recreation Center 

ana follow signs and directions. 

We appreciate your patience during this period. 









Expedition discovered 
new birds, animals 




By Eileen Laux 

KANSAS SWE C0l IEC.IAN 

Meriwether Lewis and 
William Clark discovered 
many things on their hist< >n 
cal expedition, but birds were 
some of the most fascinating 
creatures they encountered 

Carla Warn bach, environ- 
mental educator and retired 
teacher, gave a presentation 
about the kinds of birds seen 
on the expedition 

"Take Flight with Lew i- 
and Clark A Confluence of 
Cultures and Birds arc the 
Ambassadors," was ihc name 
of presentation It was the 
fourth installment of (he 
Lewis and Clark lecture se 
ries at Manhattan Public Li 
brary. 

Wambach said it all si an 
ed with Thomas Jefferson, 
who was fascinated with 
rivers and wanted to sec what 
he bought wilh the Louisiana 
Purchase. 

Shu said Jefferson sent 
Lewis and Clark and mid 
them to observe, describe and 
document. 

Bird feathers were used 
fur (.ommunicalion - as u.uill 
pens - and fur fashion - in 
hats and on clothes. 

Many birds were named 
on the expedition, including 
Clark's nutcracker and 



Carta Wambach, 
environmental 
eduiator and 
ff tired teacher 
demonstrates a 
tog horn dunng 
tefipetdiliht 
night with lewft 
awl Clark' Monday 
turning at rhf 
Manhattan httk 
Library The 
speech was the 
lutnatenetof 
lectures about the 
e«plorm 
Mm wet he i lewis 
and William Clark. 

Drew Rote 

(OOKjIAN 



1 i wis woodpecker. 

The bald eagle was the 
symbol of strength, ability 
and dignity Wambach said 
Jefferson wanted a special 
seal ttt represent our country 
He established a committee 
of himself, John Adams and 
Benjamin Franklin 

"The committee never 
agreed on a symbol and it 
took seven years for a deci- 
sion to be made." she said 
"Because, us we all know, 
Benjamin Franklin would 
have rather had Ihc turkey 
instead" 

Wambach said the globu- 
lar nests of the swallow re- 
minded him of the govern- 
ment capital buildings. 

She said the circle is a 
very powerful symbol in life 
The sun, the eyes and how a 
bird circles its prey before it 
attacks are all in the form of 
circi' 

Wambach passed around 
stuffed birds she had on dis- 
play so the audience could 
touch and hold them 

"Lets take care of our 
habitat so we don't end up 
with a silenced spring." she 
said 

She concluded the presen- 
tation with a quote from au- 
thor lames Rondu, "Knowl- 
edge unwritten is knowledge 




, .je • 144 I ■ Monhonr,. • 



Of MANHATTAN** 


I $30 OFF 


Qr.FMlE.lwMi 
Dr.JoraeM.WUkt 


f#wnmiiTrr»% 



September 3 vs. 
September 24 vs. 
October 8 vs. 
October 22 vs. 
October 29 vs. 
November 19 vs. 



Florida Int'l 
North Texas 
Kansas 
Texas A&M 
Colorado 
Missouri 



7T2005 KANSAS STATER 







GETTHEMONKATS! 



STUDENT TICKETS 



SPORTS 



Page 6 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Tuesday, May 3, 2005 



Columnist 

learns 

nothing 

comes easy 



My first experience as an editor 
at the Collegian has been a wild one 
to say the least, 
thanks to K Stale 
athletics, which 



MICHAEL ASHFORO 



have a way of 
keeping you on 
your toes 

Prom deal- 
ing with upset 
coaches to 
talking to emo- 
tional players, this semester has 
taught me a very important lesson: 
In the world of sports, nothing 
comes easy. 

While J can't cover it all, let's go 
back and take a look at some of the 
semester's highlights 

WILL HE STAY OR WILL HE GO? 

The biggest story of the spring 
may have been the issue of head 
men's basketball coach )im 
Woold ridge and his status with the 
team 

After the Wildcats finished with a 
17-12 record but no postseason play, 
some questioned whether 
Woold ridge should be fired, resign 
or stay. 

There were meetings between 
Athletics Director Tim Weiser and 
President Jon Wefald - oh, to be a 
fly on the wall - and after keeping 
everyone on edge, it was announced 
Woo Id ridge would be retained. 

Good move or bad move? No 
one knows yet, especially with the 
departure of guard Pred Pecte, who 
will transfer from the team to have a 
better shot at being an NBA point 
guard. 

Quick tip to Peete - if you can't 
cut it as point guard at K- State, 
you're not going to find much luck 
anywhere else 

ANOTHER LEGEND MOVES ON 

Forward Kendra Wecker ended 
her incredible run at K State as the 
conference's and school's all-time 
leader in points (2,333) and the 
school leader in rebounds (1,087). 
She was named first-team Ail-Amer- 
ican by almost everyone, and was 
the fourth pick in the 2005 WNBA 
draft by the San Antonio Silver 
Stars. 

It was a joy covering Wecker for 
the short time I was able to, not 
only because she was a phenomenal 
basketball player, but because she 
was a remarkable person off the 
court. 

She was - and still is - always 
humble, even as she watched her 
jersey lifted into the rafters at Bram- 
lage Coliseum, and she genuinely 
cares about other people 

An example: After yours truly 
had a bout with the flu during 
K-Sutc's game at Nebraska, Wecker 
found out, and at the next game, she 
came up to me and said she had 
heard I was sick and that she hoped 
I was feeling better 

I am sad to see her go, but 1 wish 
her all the success in the world as a 
professional athlete. K-State may 
never see another like her. 

WE'RE TALKING SPRING 
FOOTBALL 

The Wildcats just wrapped up 

Set COLUMN Page* 



Awards off the field 




Catrina Rawton | (OUffflAN 

Mkhaela Franklin, K-State volleyball player, hugs Lai Sad before receiving the SmM Award foe academic success Monday evening it the K -State student athlete recog- 
nition banquet. Student athletes were recognized and awarded for their success at the banquet. 



K- State athletes honored 
at awards banquet Monday 



By Michael Athford 

KANSAS STATKOUEtjIAN 

Por a few hours Mon- 
day night, 200 K-Stale stu- 
dent athletes shed their 
jerseys for more formal at- 
tire. 

Gathered in the main 
ballroom at the K-State 
Alumni Center, the stu- 
dent athletes were hon- 
ored by the university at 
the Ninth Annual Student 



Athlete Recognition Ban- 
quet. 

"This is our one oppor- 
tunity to step back and 
recognize those who have 
achieved great things not 
only on the field of play, 
but in the classroom as 
well," Athletics Director 
Tim Weiser said. "We are 
glad to have the chance to 
do that 

"It's my great pleasure 
to be able to recognize and 



watch the individuals who 
do great things be appro- 
priately singled out for 
those accomplishments " 

After the assembly of 
student athletes, coaches, 
counselors, advisors and 
guests finished their meals, 
Master of Ceremonies 
Wyatl Thompson, director 
of sportscasting and public 
relations and radio "Voice 
of the Wildcats," intro- 
duced several athletes for 
special awards. 

Seniors Michaela 

Franklin (volleyball) and 
Mathew Chesang (cross 
country) received the Snell 
Award Senior Eric Rollins 
(baseball) was honored 



with the Gina Sylvester 
Memorial Award, while se- 
nior Chaytan Hill (track 
and field) won the Very I 
and Pern Switzer Campus 
Leadership Award. 

The Scholar-Athlete 
Award went to co- recipi- 
ents seniors Kendra Week 
er (women's basketball) 
and Gabby Guerre (volley- 
ball) and to senior Brian 
Casey (football) 

Senior Trisha Culbert- 
son (cross country) re- 
ceived the Scholastic 
Achievement Award - 
given to the senior letter- 
winner with the highest 

See BANQUET Page 9 



MEN'S GOLF 



Wildcats take 10th at Big 12 tourney 



By Angle Hanson 

KANSAS SIATt COll tGIAM 

Despite a lOth-place 
team finish at this week- 
end's Big 12 Championships 
in Trinity, Texas, senior 
golfer Matt Van Cleave 
managed to assert control, 
landing in fourth place. 

"I'm so excited for Matt 
to have been in the position 
to win the tournament on 
the last day," Coach Tim 
N urri s said. "That's an ac- 
complishment in itself." 

Van Cleave set himself 
up for a Big 12 Champi- 
onship title going into the 



final round on Sunday. 

With rounds of 70 and 71 
under his belt, Van Cleave 
had the opportunity to nab 
first place His final round 
of 76 and combined score of 
217 pushed him back to 
fourth, giving first to Okla- 
homa's Anthony Kim 

Van Cleave said although 
he was pleased with his ef- 
forts, he is not ready to set 
tie for two good rounds. 

"It's tough to play well 
for two rounds and then 
play myself out of con- 
tention," Van Cleave said. 

"It was a course where if 
you made a bad shot, you 



were going to pay for it," he 
said. 

Still, Norris said Van 
Cleaves achievements at 
the Championship and all 
season have been nothing 
short of phenomenal 

"It's great to see Matt 
make the all-conference 
team," Norris said. 

"He's played hard all 
year - the play of Matt is a 
great example for the rest of 
the team," he said 

In fact, Van Cleave 
grabbed the best individual 
finish by a Wildcat in con- 
ference history since 1 970. 

While the performances 



of the other four Wildcats 
were not disappointing, 
Norris said, it simply was 
not enough. 

"There just weren't 
enough good shots and not 
enough confidence to get 
over the hump," he said. 
"We needed a good day 
Sunday, and we didn't get it. 
If we had three Matt Van 
Cleaves, we'd be a great 
team" 

The Wildcats finished in 
10th with a collective score 
of 925, while Oklahoma 
State, the No. 1 team in the 

Set GOLF Pay 9 



TENNIS 



Cats end season with bittersweet weekend at tourney 



By Chris Patch 

KANSAS STAIECOLltUAH 

After a 4-3 upset over No. 7 
Oklahoma in the first 
round of the Big 12 Tourna- 
ment, the spring tennis season 
ended (or K-State with a 4-0 
lota to No. 2 seed Tens In 
Austin, Texas on Saturday. 

The Wildcats (9-12, 4 8) 
avenged a 6- 1 regular season 
lot* to the Sooners. even after 
dropping the doubles point, 
which was a bad omen for 
K-State through most of the 



Head coach Steve Bietau 
said he saw tome resilient play 
from bit squad against Okla- 



The players did a great job 
of hanging in there,* Bietau 
said. 'We didn't get a good 
start, and for the first hour and 
a half of the match, things 
looke. eair. More than 

anything, they just hong in 



there and really gave them- 
selves a chance and slowly 
turned it around. 

"Probably the greatest ac- 
complishment was that we had 
three players that lost their sin- 
gles matches the first time 
(against Oklahoma) that won 
their singles matches this time " 

After a spirit-lifting first- 
round upset, the Wildcats 
faced Texas in the second 
round, and were disposed of 
quickly. 

The season-ending loss was 
similar to the regular -season 
match against Texas, one in 
which K-State was easily shut- 
out 

"They're fust belter," Bietau 
•aid of the Longhoms "Baylor 
and Texas were hist better than 
the rest of the conference ibis 
year, and if anything (Texas 
wai ) a little bil sharper against 
us this rune." 

The Texas lott put an end to 
a streaky season in which 



K-State dropped five matches 
4-3 If anything, the 4 3 Okla- 
homa win had to be encourag- 
ing to a (cam that has let close 
matches slip away again and 
again. 

Bietau said despite getting 
knocked out of the tourna- 
ment, the turnaround against 
Oklahoma was a positive way 
to end the season 

"Yeah, 1 was," he said when 
asked if he was pleated with 
the team's play To reverse a 6- 
1 lota and turn it Into a 4-3 win 
is a pretty good accomplish- 
ment for a team. 1 was proud of 
the way they performed there, 
and there were a number of 
matches this year that were 
very similar to that where we 
just couldn't get the job done" 

Although the season has 
come to an end for the team, 
individual players still stand a 
chance to he selected for the 
NCAA Tournament Senior 
Maria Rosenberg, freshman 




Chris HwMWtndrt 1 10UEUAN 
i a vaaty tarter Mi tstaaa. TUs string team one t« a* tni afttt 
tketbMr\lmteIes^SanMbm^t)irwptarmwtKi(MWh*MiKi«lutVI 



Tennis Selection Show takes 
place at 3:30 p.m. on Wednes- 
day and will be broadcast on 
ESP News. 



Tamer Kvaralskhelia and ju- 
nior Jessica Simosa could be 
selected. 

The 2005 NCAA Women's 



1 MINUTE 
DRILL 

The Associated Press 

MLB | Rincon suspended for 
violating drug policy 

NEW YORK — Minnesota Twins 
pitcher luan Rmcon was suspended for 
10 days Monday, making him the fifth 
player under 
Major league 
Baseball's new 
policy on perfor- 
mance 
enhancing drugs 

Rincon was 
a key contributor 
to the Twins' AL 
Central 
winning team 
last season. He 

went 116 with two saws and a 2 63 
ERA in 77 games. This year, he was 2-1 
with a 2 25 ERA in 12 appearances. 

Four players had previously 
received 10-day bans, all with relatively 
low profiles: Tampa Bay outfielder Alex 
Sanchez, Colorado outfielder lorge 
Pledra, Texas minor league pitcher 
Agustln Monte ro and Seattle minor 
league outfielder lamal Strong. 




Rincon 



CBB | Oil coach resigns after 
controversial remarks 

NORMAN, Okla Although the 
player and his father had accepted his 
apology and forgiven baseball coach 
Larry Cochell for alleged racial remarks 
he nude during a couple interviews, 
Cochell decided to end his 14-year 
career with the 
University of 
Oklahoma. 

In a three- 
paragraph letter 
submitted to Oil 
President David 
Boren, Cochell 
said he was 
honored and 
privileged to 




Cochell 




White 



have been 

associated with the school but felt it 

necessary to resign. 

Boren, who had met with Athletics 
Director Joe Castiglione and members 
of the university's black community on 
the matter, accepted the letter and said 
Castiglione had designated Sunny 
Golloway as interim head baseball 
coach for the rest of the season 

NFL | Chiefs won't invite 
White back to mini-camp 

KANSAS CITY, Mo - lason White, 
the former Oklahoma quarterback 
passed over in the NFL draft, won't be 
invited back to the Kansas City Chiefs' 
mini-camp. 

White, who 
won the Heisman 
Trophy as a junior 
in 2001, got the 
news Sunday 
from coach Dick 
Vermeil at the 
end of a three 
daytryoutfot 
rookies. He had 
been 
competing with 

seventh round draft choice lames Kilian 
of Tulsa for a possible spot with the 
Chiefs, who already have three veteran 
quarterbacks on the roster 

"What I recommended him to do, 
if he really wants to play in the NFL , is 
to go to the Arena League, sharpen his 
skilb and compete," Vermeil said. 

NBA | Ben Wallace wins 
Defensive Player of the Year 

AUBURN HILLS. Mich — Pistons 
center Ben Wallace won the NBAs 
Defensrve Player 
of the Year award 
for the third time 
m four yean 
Monday. 

Wallace, 
who was 
presented with 
the award at an 
afternoon news 
conference, 
joins Oikembe 

Mutombo as the only two players to 
win the award three or more times. 

Wallace also won It In 2002 and 
2001. Mutombo won In 1995, 1997, 
1998 and 2001 

During the regular season, he 
ranked fifth with 2 18 blocks per game, 
second with 12 2 rebounds » game and 
23rd wtth 1.41 steals a game. 




Watlece 



TEN | Roddick, Agassi, 
Henman win in Rome 

R0MI— Top seeded Andy 
Roddick sharpened his clay-court gam* 
Monday, defeating Greg Rusedskl 6-4, 
6-2 m the fkni round of the rtakan 

Open. 

SWh-seeded Andre Agassi, winner 
of the Rome title In 2002, beat wild 
ad Alesslo N Mauro of Italy 7-5, 6-2. 
He has not won since capturing his lone 
title of 2004 at rb* Cmcmtiati Masters In 

Fourth-seeded Tim Henman of 
Britain eliminated three time French 
Open winner Gustavo Kuerten of Brazil 
6-3, 6-J. 



/ 



ARTS | ENTERTAINMENT | SEX | FOOD | YOUR LIFE 

THE EDGE 



Tuesday, May 3, 2005 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Piercing risks 



Mouth piercing 

gains popularity; 

has health risks 



By Alex Peak 

KANSAS STATt Cffllf WAN 

Tongue piercings may be fun and 
decorative, but they come with many 
risks to the inside of the mouth. 

fared Lysaught, junior in pre nursing 
said he has had his tongue pierced for a 
little over two years. He said it was 
something he did spontaneously 

"It was the easiest thing I could do. 
It's not hard to hide. I can take it out 
easily," he said. 

"It was swollen at first but I had no 
pain at all" 

He said the piercing was weird to 
adapt to at first because there is not usu- 
ally something through the tongue. 

"fust as long as I use a plastic ball 
and not a metal one, it shouldn't be a big 
deal,'' Lysaught said, commenting on 
what a dentist told to him. 

Tongue piercing has only been popu- 
lar for about 10 years, Dr )osh Walker, 
DDS, said. 

"I do a lot of crown work because 
people tend to bite down on the ball," he 
said. "It is common to see people with 
piercings have jagged teeth from acci- 
dents with the metal ball" 

Walker said that as people get older, 
their teeth get more brittle. He predicts 
that the people with mouth piercings 
today will be having a tot of problems in 
50 to 60 years 

Another problem Walker mentioned 
is gum recession He said that by having 
a ball in the mouth, every time the wear- 
er talks or plays with it, the lower part 
pushes down on the gums behind the 
bottom teeth, causing them to recede. 

"The gum area behind your lower 
teeth is a target spot for tartar and 
plaque buildup, which can lead to prob- 
lems," Walker said. 

"Getting your tongue pierced can 
make for many problems down the road 
and a lot of money spent on fixing 
teeth" 

For those who decide to get a pierc- 
ing anyway. Walker said to get a plastic 
ball instead of metal because it will do 
less damage He also said it is important 
to keep your mouth clean in order to 
keep out bacteria. 

Victoria Warren, a body piercer ap- 
prentice at Fine Line Tattoo Inc , said 
tongue piercings take about six to eight 
weeks to heal and initial swelling should 
go down within two to 10 days. 

Warren suggested staying away from 
spicy or hot food for a while and to 
avoid beer and alcohol She also said to 
rinse with an antiseptic after eating, 
drinking or smoking while the piercing 
is healing. 

'To prevent swallowing the ball, 
make sure it's screwed in tightly after 
you brush your teeth everyday," Warren 




said. "The first few days are rough, hut 
the swelling and the lisp go away pretty 
fast" 

Evan S mi they, a Manhattan resident 
who has had his tongue pierced for 



about four years, said it took his mouth 
three months to heal. 

"It didn't hurt, it just got annoying 
and swelled up," he said "But I did bite 
ii u hit, and that hurt" 



Photo Mmtrwlon by Unds«y Bauman | COU EGIAN 

"I got the piercing on a whim and my 
parents freaked" 

"As long as you take good care of it 
and keep it clean, there shouldn't be any 
problems," Warren said. 



Decemberists take listeners on an adventure 



"Picaresque" 
***** 



Album rmiew by J*ttka Grant 



For all those non-English ma 
jors out there, die work "pi- 
caresque" means "of or involving 
clever rogues or adventurers." 

Technically, the term relates to a 
genre of fiction originating in Spain {think 
"Don Quixote") dial captures the humor- 
ous adventures of a roguish hero of usual- 
ly low social standing who lives by his 
own wits in a corrupt society. 

Now, before any literature lovers get 
into a huff over this hasty definition, keep 
in mind that you are reading a newspaper 
Shameful as it may be, even words with 
rich contextual history must be merciless- 




ly trimmed for the sake 
of space. 
But how could this 
possibly relate to 
music'' 

The indie rock 
band The Decem- 
berists recendy re- 
leased an album enli • 
Qed "Picaresque," a word that 
has probably never graced the ears of 
most of the public 

"Picaresque" is easily the best work the 
baroque pop group has released to date 
and after the year The Decemberists have 
had, they certainly deserved to create 
such a notable album 

The year began on a low note when 
"Picaresque" was leaked to online file 
sharing venues, despite the band's appeal 
to fans not to share the album 



Then, only a few days into its latest 
tour, while in its hometown of Portland, 
Ore „ the band's gear was stolen 

Despite all of this, the band persevered 
and was able to finish its tour on bor 
rowed instruments, 

Sounds like the perfect material for a 
picaresque novel 

The Decemberists are fronted by Colin 
Mcloy, whose degree in creative writing 
becomes most evident in his songwriting 
ability. 

Essentially, one could see the main 
theme of "Picaresque" as having to deal 
with confounded expectations For m 
stance, "Eli, The Barrow Boy" is a tale set 
in a historical background This soft song, 
gently laden with a banjo and accordion 
recounts the story of a poor boy working 
constantly and pining for the financial 
ability to buy his love "a fine gown" Eli 



eventually drowns whde slaving away (or 
the sake of love As sappy as it sounds, 
the song is phenomenal. 

One of the most moving songs the 
album is "On the Bus Mall," which is the 
story of a runaway turned prostitute "You 
learn quick to make a fast buck/ In (he 
bathrooms and barrooms, on dumpster 
and heirlooms/ We hit our tongues/ 
Sucked out lips into our lungs 'til we were 
falling/ Such was our calling." Powerful 

In all, it is impossible to capture the 
moving and cohesive power of this album 

"Picaresque" as a whole contains a 
larger theme than each individual song 
conveys. It tells the story of a society 
seized by chaos, selfishness and greed. 
Yet, this society still contains a kind of 
bizarre, muted beauty The kind of beauty 
that makes it seem perfcedy natural to 
dream. 



Folk group creates wonderfully psychedelic album 



"School of the Flower" 
***** 

Album rtvlMi by Mark i 



Soft is the new loud in the indie rock 
arena. Anyone who is the least bit 
plugged into the music scene has no- 
ticed an insurgence of artists who are 
reviving the Intimate sound of folk rock. 
Prom Iron and Wine's soft guitar strum- 
ming, to Devendra Banhart's eccentric 
yet charming songwriting, to Animal 
Collective's wildly experimental out- 



bursts, folk is being resurrected in many 
new ways 

This new appreciation for folk music 
allows a long-time folk artist the chance 
to get the respect and attention he de- 
serves. Ben Chasny is the creative ge- 
nius behind Six Organs of Admittance 
and newest member of the psychedelic 
noise rock outfit, Comets on Fire, 

The album opens with Corsano 
pounding out a powerful free jazz per- 
cussion storm in the song "Eighth Cog- 
nition/All You've Left." Just as the mael- 
strom reaches its peak, it breaks away 
to reveal Chasny softly strumming an 



acoustic guitar Then 
the listener is treated 
to Chasny's lilting, hyp 
notic voice, the perfect 
complement to the over 
all whole of the album 

Perhaps die best track 
on the album is die in- 
strumental, 13 -minute 
epic, "School of the 
Flower" It begins with a 
wonderful, hypnotic guitar 
figure that repeats itself before effects 
double and triple it on top of itself. 
Along with this guitar, fierce electric 




guitar, percussion, and organ 
drones are layered onto the 
increasingly complex and psy- 
chedelic track. 

Six Organs of Admit- 
tance has been recording for 
years, but "School of the 
Flower," finds Chasny using 
the studio to wonderful 
ends The result is an 
album that is extremely dense 
without being overwhelming, psyche- 
delic without losing its accessibility, and 
an overall essential listen by anyone 
who loves music. 



Page 7 



CELEB NEWS 

Hawn book favors 
spirituality over gossip 

From the start, 6oWe Hawn knew 
whit kind of book she tMnl want to 
write No salaaous details, no tell jIL 
rjehnd-the-scenes gossipfests about 
ewryone she <s met in the mtrrtaltimeffl 
industry owr the last 10 years or so 

tt took i while tn pin it down, but 
she figured out what book she did want: 
something that would be somewhat 
about her, but would also touch on the 
things everyone goes through in life. 

"I tried to do ft in such a way that I 
didn't feel any different than anybody 
else," she told The Associated Press on 
Monday, the release da te for her memoir, 
"A lotus Grows in the Mud" 

"We all share In life's journey, and 
the emotions thai comeupand the diffi- 
culties that arise because thafs what life 
does," Hawn said during an Interview in 
her midtown apartment decorated wtth 
Buddhas and other Asian art. 



Jennifer Lopez's fur frenzy 

The fur K flying over Jennifer Lopez's 
fashion decisions 

PtTA has made the multlhyphenate 
diva the object of rts latest campaign 
against animals being killed for their 
pelts. The group has its daws out over 
Lopez's fondness both for wearing fur and 
for using rt in her fashion line, Sweetface 

Friday's work) premiere rot LopezV 
upcoming film. Monster in law, in 
theaters May B, was well attended by 
Pel* protesters armed with posters 
featuring a mink-clad J.Lo with the 
caption "Monster in-Fur" 



BOOKS 

New York Times 
Best-Seller List 

Hardcover fiction 

1 . True Believer" by Nicholas Sparks 

1 "The Mermaid Chatr." by Sue Monk 

DM 

i. "The Da Vinci Code," by Dan Brown 

4 "Revenge of the Sith,"by Matthew 

Stover 

I "No Place Like Home." by Mary 

Higglns Clark 

Hardcover nonfiction 

1 "My life So Far," by lane Fonda 

I The World Is Flat" by Thomas L 

Friedman 

1. "Blink," by Malcolm Gladwell 

4 "Freakonomio,"by Steven Levitt 
and Stephen J. Dubner 

5 "On Bull ," by Harry G. Frankfurt 

Paperback fiction 

1 The Kite Runner" by Khaled Hosseini 

2 "Nighttime is My Time," by Mary 
Higglns Clark 

I "full Bloom," by lanet i vanovich and 
Charlotte Hughes 

4. "R Is for Ricochet," by Sue Grafton 
S Therapy," by Jonathan Kellerman 

Paperback nonfktion 

l The Tipping Point" by Malcolm 
Gladwell 

2. "Reading lollta in Tehran ," by Azar 
MM 

i. The Devil in the White City," by ink 

Larson 

4 "Guns, Germs, and Steel," by lated 

Diamond 

5. The Bookseller of Kabul." by Asne 
Seierstad 



NEW 
RELEASES 



Music 



a. The forgotten Arm" 
Amy Grant, "Rock Of Ages Hymns & 
faith" 

Billy Gllman, "everything & More* 
Blessed Union Of Souls, "Perception" 
Embrace, "Out Of Nothing" 
J*d Valasouez, 'Beauty Has Grace' 
Mercury Rev, The Secret Migration' 
Nine Indi Malta, "With Teeth" 
Wvea, "Complicated" 
ryanAaamjlTheCanliflata/CoW 
Roses* 

Shelly FairdilMt'Ride" 
Soundtrack, "Star Wars Episode III: 
Revenge Of The Sitti" 
Stevt* Wonder, "A Time 2 love* 
"Daftly* 




For the best deals on 
music, movies, end 

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Page 8 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Tuesday, May 3, 2005 



- I 



_ | | II II L || I I I I 

: L 1 1 1 ■ ■ L» 

■»• aaw ^~ ■ ■ eat a *■" 



LET'S RENT 



For Rent- 
Apts. Furnished 

.,1UOIO APARTMENTS 
On* block from camput 
An aj| MUM <-}""'' ' Ml 
lions Furnished of unfur- 
nished. June and August 
WIS (785)5.39-3638 



Call tor ew*- 
ing details (785)539-5508 
No cats or dogs 

511 BLUEMONT: two-be* 
room basement, new 

range, laundry, no pets 
June or August $430 plus 
1785)313-0462 



826 VATTrER- Two-bed- 
room spacious apartment, 
laundry facilities Water/ 
trash paid One year lease 
August 1 $490, (785)539- 
8704 

8t4 THURSTON: Two-bed- 
room. June year lease. No 
pets Water/ Irasti pair) 
WOO (7BS)83»-SU6. 

•15 R ATONE One bed 
room downstairs S42S ilT 
Kearney, one or two-bed- 
room upstairs. 1425 RIO 
Colorado, basement effi- 
ciency, J275 No pels Au- 
gust. (785) 77 0-8548 

A ONE- BEDROOM June 
1. 1704 Fairview 1100 
Kearney (785)317-7713 



WIS 



Net 



ITMHU-Sftt? 



1101 

For Refll- 
Apt 
Unfurnished 

1500 Large two-bedroom. 

Dishwasher, disposal, cen- 
tral air June t Pets ok 
(785)31 t 

S975/ MONTH Early Bird 
discount offer! Four-bed- 
room two and one-half bath 
town home with washer/ 
dryer provided Call 
(785)537-2111 

1026 BLUEMONT One 

and two-bedroom June 1 

[785)317-7713 

1126 BLUEMONT. Studio 
apartments with all bills 
paid Neutral colors with 
nice carpels Overlooking 
Aggieviiie with off-street 
parking Save on parking 
permits and walk to campus 
Available June 1 No pets 
(785)313-mi. 

1215 PONVTZ- One-bad- 
room basement apartment 
with neutral colors and full 
Btn windows Large walk- in 
closet All bills paid $425 
August No pets (785)313- 
4812- 

1215 THURSTON One 
block to campus One-bed- 
room apartment Newly ren- 
ovated $390 All bills paid 
June lease No pets 
(7«S)S3ft-0S49. 

1219 KEARNEY Two-bed- 
room June, year lease No 
pets. Water/ trash paid. 
Across street hflM campus 
S650 (785)539-5136. 

1844 ANDERSON, new 
construction, three- bed- 
room, two bath, personal 
washer/ dryer, nigh -speed 
internet, available June 1 
[785)554-3456 or (785)565- 
1310 

350 N 16th A block to cam- 
pus Five minute walk to Un 
wo or Aggievtfle Two-bed- 
room apartments Big bed- 
rooms, central air. dish- 
washer Washer/ dryer on 



ONE AND two-bedroom 

apartments, many dose to 
campus with washer/ dryer 
No pets Call (785)341-1960 
or (785|341-33S5 

ONE. TWO three, tout-bed- 
room apartments and hous- 
es June and August 
leases No pels Call 
(785)539-1975, (785)313- 
8296 

ONE- AND two-bedroomi 

Walk to campus, covered 
parking, June 1 and Aug 1 
leasee, vary nlcet (785)341 ■ 
6000 

ONE-BEDROOM AND Stu- 
dio apartments. One-bed- 
room, $280/ month Studio 
$260/ month All utilities ei- 
cepl electric paid Lease 
and deposit reouired Avail- 
able June l (785)537-7794 



ar. central 
air One year or 6 month 
lease, (785)317-7713 

SLOCK TO CAMPUS Spe- 
cious two-bedroom. No 
pats Water and trash tur- 
niahed (7M)63»-4»M. 
CRESTWOOD APART 
ME NTS West side two- 
bedroom one and one-half 
baths Personal washer/ 
dryer, fireplace, pool Water, 
bash, cable paid. No pets 
$670- 1670. (TW)77ft-3Me. 



FOURBEDROOMJ TWO 
bathroom, Neat old home 
near part and campus, new 
remodel, water/ trash paM, 
pets, laundry, Aug I 
(9l3|21B~*4a? 

NtW 12-PtEX available 
June Two-bedroom, luxury 
ap artme nt s 1010 BNjemont, 
two ADA friendly $800- 
$825/ month. (7K)77*-2102 
or (786)056-201 4 No pats 

NEW DOMO. threa-ted- 

room Central heal/ air, 
washer/ dryer hook-up. dNh- 
washer, off-street parking, 
two fu§ baths, water and 
trash paid OonT mfaa trsa 
onat <7WP4j1-at21 or 
(7t8fT7VJt1l. 



ONE -BEDROOM 

ment Gas/ water/ trash 
paid Laundry taciliiies One 
year lease June 1 , $380.00 
(78S)53»-8704 

ONE BEDROOM NEXT to 
campus. Trash and water 
included Available June i 
or AurjuSi I (785)313-7473 

ONE-BEDROOM WITH 
neutral colors for August 
Across from City Park wilh 
off-slreel parking Local 
landlords who care and 
maintain the properly Wa- 
ter/ trash paid. No pets 
(785)313-461? 

ONE BEDROOM. AVAILA- 
BLE August Close to cam- 
pus Water/ trash paid. Cen- 
tral an (785)537-7810. 

ONE BEDROOM TWO 
blocks to campus and Ag 
gieville Washer/ dryer 
Pets ok (785)317-7713 

PRE-LEAStNG JUNE and 
August Some units brand 
new. close to KSU, washer/ 
dryer Included. Call for de- 
tails 1 785)776-2 1 02 or 
(785)556-2014 Nopals 

STUDIO APARTMENT 
close to campus. 1030 
Kearney July/ August lease 
available No pels, trash 
paid. Call Aaron (816)729- 
6942 

THREE -BEDROOM ADJA- 
CENT to campus All major 
appliances, ott- street part- 
ing, water and trash paid 

(785)564-1197 

THREE-BEDROOM CLOSE 

to campus Central air, 
dishwasher, laundry facili- 
ties No pets (785)539- 
0666 

TWO AND three-bed- 
rooms Close to campus 
Spacious, dishwasher, cen- 
tral air. laundry facilities No 
pets (78S)S39-0»66 

TWO-BEDROOM APART 
ME NTS. Available June. Ju- 
ly, and August. 1114 Ber- 
nard ($580). 1200 Fremont 
($600- $640). 701 N 9th 
($500- $550), 2014 Seaton 
($530), 523 Moro ($530). 
363 N 14th ($520- 600) 
www.rent-apm.com. 
(785)539-4357. 

TWO-BEDROOM, ONE 
bath. Close to campus 
1826 Anderson Water and 
trash paid (785)341-4408. 

WALK TO CAMPUS Spa- 
cious two-bedroom apart 
ments, lots of windows, qui- 
et conditions, ample park- 
ing, furnished or unfurnish- 
ed, washer/ dryer in apart 
ment, reasonable rent. 
June and August No pels 
PMJecaMM 



120 




11000 FOUR BEDROOM. 2 
bath duple > Only tour 
years old. Good sized bed- 
rooms June Emerald Prop- 
erty Management (786)880- 
6899 

$1200: FOUR-BEDROOM, 
TWO bathroom duptei. 
three blocks Norn campus 
and Aggieviiie One year 
old, avswabie August 1. Cat 
Bnen at (786)846-81 12 

$44$ TWO-BEDROOM du- 



EmaraM Property 
ment (766)556-6899 

1118 COLORADO 

Four 



725 MORO Nice tour bed- 
room, near campus, Aggie- 
viiie Large detached ga 
r/ dryer, disti- 
$1000/ month 
Avertable June 1 (913)710- 
4730 

A CLOSE all or five-bed- 
room two bath, central air 
Dishwasher, washer, dryer. 
pets okay June 1 
(786)317-7713 

CUTE THREE-BEDROOM 
two bath house for rent 
One mile west of KSU. $826 
plus utilities (785)317-6464 

FOUR-BEDROOM. TWO 
and one-half bath at $97$/ 
month (785)537 2111 or 

century 2 1 Knight com 

FOUR-BEDROOM, TWO 
bath duplex 1410 Houston, 
halt mile from campus, laun- 
dry, single property landlord 
No smoking, no pets 
$11507 month, August l 
(785)776-9260. 

FOUR BEDROOM, TWO 

bath house Washer/ dryer, 
great location Spacious In- 
terior Some pets okay Aug 
1 lease (913)963-7422 

FOUR-BEDROOM. TWO 
bath large house. Close to 
campus Washer, dryer 
dishwasher, air $250 each 
person (785)778-2100. 

LOOK! BRAND NEW 
HOUSE! Four-bedroom, two 
bath Washer/ dryer, refnger- 
ator, central air One -ha It 
mile lo campus August 
lease $1400/ month Under 
construction 1614 Pierre 
(7851304-0387. (785)776- 
9124 

NEAR AGGtEVILLE tour 
bedroom house, central air 
conditioning, ott-alreel park- 
ing. $1000 per month plus 
utilities (785)537-8070 

NEW LISTING: Available 

soon. Three-bedroom, two 
bath Large living room, 
game mom, computer room 
Located a I 918 Berlrand. 
washer/ dryer, central air. 
yard, tronl porch (785)539- 
3672 

NEW SPACIOUS four-bed- 

room duplex, two bath, two 
full laundry, game room with 
we! bar 928 Osage $1200 
(765)539-1564 

NICE HOUSES for rent 

Three, four, live and eight- 
bedrooms Close to cam- 
pus June, July and August 
leases Call Cliff (620)242 
7823 

ONE-BEDROOM HOUSE 
close to campus 1010 N, 
11th street No pets, trash 
paid, summer lease availa- 
ble CaH Aaron (816)729 
6942 

RENT-APM.COM NOW 
leasing houses, apart- 
ments, and dupkwea Avail- 
able now June. July . and 
August ww w.rwrt-Bpm.corn . 
(785)539-4357 

THREE, FOUR, five-bed- 
room houses Close to 
campus Off si reel parking 
Washer/ dryer June and 
August teases (785)449 
2181 

THREE-BEDROOM AVAIL 
ABLE June Close lo cam 
pus Fenced yard Pats on 
approval (786)837 -7110 

THREE-BEDROOM DU- 
PLEX Available June 
Trash and mowing paid 
Central air Washer/ dryer 
1 785)537- ?iS 10 

THREE B EOROOM 
HOUSE, 1818 Campus 
$900/ month Ctose to Vet 
Med Teaching Hospital 
June leas*. (720)733-1659 
700pm. 



w asher/ dryer included Au- 
gust lease. $225/ room 
(fOOlZTMiaS, 

1733 KENMAR, A (MEAT 
yard tor barbae use and 
tun. Spacious house Three, 
tout -bedrooms AH apptatv 
cas Close to stadium 
Plaaaeoal(78S)S3a-ll77 

MOVE M Now. 1019 Hous 
ton Three-bedroom with 
day room upstai r s. KNeratn 
appaanoas, Near way pern. 



de mw aehai central air One 
car garage with big back 
yard. $826/ month 
(785)207-0212 

TWO TEARS OM Four 
bedroom, two and ona-haD 
bath ALL appliances Includ- 
ing washer, dryer, micro- 
wave Great floor ptan with 
large bedrooms No pels 
August $1200 (788)688- 




THREE -BEDROOM 
HOUSE June/ August avail 
able $1300 electric/ gas/ 
water/ trash patd Washer/ 
dryer shared wtth basement 
(7W)34 1-6807. 

THREE-BEDROOM HOUS- 
ES end apartmen t s, June 
and August l eases Close to 
campus. No pats. (785)539- 
1975orf788Pt3-ag9a 

THREE BEDROOM HOUS 
ES and apartmarw s starting 
at $750- $1100 Ooae to 
campus, June and August 
lease* No pats (786)639- 
t$7S or (786)313-8298. 

THREE-BEDROOM. ONE 
bath 730 Pottawatomie 




For Renl- 
Apts. Furnished 



R OO tfW a wl 

Wanted 

FEMALE HOUSEMATE. No 

drinking/ smoking. $275/ 
month. One-third utilities, 
washer, dryer. August 
lees*. amlca313eKsu.edu 
or (785)537-1464 

GUVS SHARE a house 
$30<y month and share utilit- 
ies Close to City Part After 
6 pm. call (785)456-9109 

MALE WANTED Three- 
bedroom, washer/ dryer, 
central air, July lease $300/ 
month, one-llwd utilities 
(785)392-4856 

ROOMMATE WANTED: 

preferably male to share 
two -bedroom house with 
central heat and air One- 
hail block from campus 
June lease Call Tom 
(785)341-2098 



per month! 

Sum l.i'iisinn (or 
2005-2066! 

■i nl 



1101 
ForRerrl- 
Apt 
Unfurnished 

ONE TWO, three and tour- 
bedroom apartments Close 
lo campus and Aggmville 
Dishwasher, laundry, and 
parking (785)537-6017 

ONE, TWO, three bed- 
rooms Available June and 
August (785)537-7138 or 
(785)313-1256 

ONE-BEDROOMS AND slu 
dios Close to campus 
Available June and August 
www renl-apm com 
(785)539-4357 

PARK PLACE APART- 
MENTS. Hurry" m 
limited. One- two- Ihrep 
bedrooms (78SI639-296I 



1101 

ForRerrt- 
Apt. 

DnlumisfKHJ 



120 

For Rent 
MrjJJSM 




TWO- BEDROOM APART 
MENTS. duplenes. and 
houses Several locations 
Available June July, and 
August www renl-apm com 
(755)539-4357 

TWO BEDROOM CI OSE 
to campus Private balcony 
Central air New carpet, 
dishwasher June less* 
(785)341-6070. 



II 

i 
S , 



UNIVERSITY 
TERRACE APTS. 

Spacious 2&i Btdmm Apts 

Washa/Dryer 

wWosher/DtytrHcokupi 

Spacious Grounds & Pool 

No Pits 
1530 College Ave. 

CALL 537-2096 
9 a.m. lo 6 p.m. 



Rooms 

Available 

ROOM FOR rent lor sum 
mer. Females only. Cheap 
rent Close to campus. Can 
(7B5)76ii 




BIG HOUSE: Six -bedrooms, 
two kilchens, two baths, two 
living mom. Duplex three 
bedroom All dean Good 
condition (785)537 2289 



DUPLEX LARGE four-bed- 
room, two and one-hall bath 
near campus and Aggtavwe 
(785)537-6017 

FIVE. SIX and seven-bed- 
room house (I wo- three 
kitchens) Available June, 
July, and August Several 
local ions www rent- 

apmoom (785)539-4357 

FOUR AND five-bedrooms 
Available June and August 
(785)537 7138 or (785)313- 
1256 

FOUR -BEDROOM HOUSE 
Washer/ dryer Nice large 
rooms Otl-slreet parking 
(785)537-1566 

FOUR BEDROOM HOUS- 
ES and duplexes Several 
locations Available June. 
Jury, and Augusl Pets al- 
lowed in most www renl- 
apmcom (785)539-435/ 

FOURBEDROOM TWO 
bathhouse 1715 Colorado 
Washer/ dryer and dish- 
washer Available June. Ju 
ly or Augusl $12007 month 
[785)5390991 



FOUH-BEOFtOOM, TWQ 
tjath 918 Thurston, all appU 
antes. air-conditioning 
laundry Clean, no pets Dtfi 
street parking August lease, 
$1000 plus utilities, 
(785)323-0061 



FOUR-BEDROOM, TWO 
blocks trom campus 1559 
Harry. $1000/ month Call 
(785)294-0362 or (785)336 
0202 

FOUR-BEDROOM, TWCJ 
blocks west of campus- 
2030 College Heights $275( 
bedroom Newly remodeled 
Washer' dryer, central heat, 
air-condilioner June 1 
lease (785)944-3491 Pels 
negotiable 

FOURBEDROOM CLOSE, 
to campus/ City Park Wash- 
er/ dryer and dishwasher 
Large house June lease. 
(788)341-5070 

JUNE. JULY, Augusl Now 
leasing one, two. three, lour 
Rve, six, seven, eight-bed' 
room houses and duplexes, 

www rent apn> 
1785)S3" 



u n i v e r s i t y 
' /' y. :; ."..\ * I Three Bedrooms 
2215CaUeatAve. I Near Campus 



1109 Kearney A Block to 
campus Two-bedroom 

apartment, washer/ dryer 
$475 all bills paid. Two 
month lease June and Jury 
No pets (785)317.3021 

ALL BILLS paid, tour-bed 
room, two bath. pool, inter- 
net, washer/ dryer As soon 
aa possible Contact Devon 
(913)406-7236 

APARTMENT FOR sum- 
mer sublease. Nice two- 
bedroom apartment Quiet 
location $500. CaH 
(785)776-9009. 

BOY OR girt $3807 month, 

Fsll 2005- Spring 2006 
172$ Anderson across the 
street from the Alumni Cen- 
ter Call Zack Clear 
(9*3)244-8473 

FEMALE SUBLEASERS 
wanted June and July 
Four -bedroom house, dean 
and spacious 618 Kearney 
Available mid- May. 

(785)341-6022. 

FURNISHED ACROSS the 
street from, campus at 1729 
Anderson Four- bedroom 
female only, trash paid 
please call (785)539-9636 

HOUSE THREE BED 
ROOMS svailsbta tor sum- 
mer sublease Big house 
and bedrooms, good loca- 
tion (926 Laramie) Air-con- 
ditioning, furnished, great 
roommate Rant negotia- 
ble! (620)353 -8 528, 
(785)770-3457 

LARGE TWO-BEDROOM 

two bath available June 1- 
July 29 Apartmen! complex 
is Campus East located at 
Clallin and McCain Lane 
Has pool, balcony, fireplace, 
dishwasher, and microwave 
Pets allowed Close lo 
campus and Aggwvtrte Rent 
is $266/ roommate Or $530/ 
month (785)341-9257. 

ONE-BEDROOM S4JB- 
LEASE and thre e bedroom 

sublease availabe lor June 
and July Emerald Property 
Management (785)556- 

ROOM AVAILABLE m tour- 
bedroom apartment May- 
July 31 Close lo campus, 
large rooms Rent $215 fne 
gotiable) plus cheap utilities 
May rent paid. (785)341- 
3535 

ROYAL TOWERS One- 
bedroom, one bath $430/ 
monlh June- July Available 
mid-May. Dishwasher/ mi- 
crowave Cell Jaaae 
(318)518-8087 

SUBLEASE CHASE Men- 
hattan Apartments, three- 
bedroom, available June t, 
tower level, $780 per month 
(785)532-9951 



Manhattan City Ordinance 
4814 assures every per- 
son equal opportunity In 
housing without distinc- 
tion on account of rsce, 
sex, familial status, milita- 
ry status, disability, reli- 
gion, age. color, national 
origin or ancestry. Viola- 
tions should be repo rt ed 
to the Director ot Human 
Resources at City Hall, 
(785)587-2440 



110 

For Banl- 

Afjt 



$475. CLEAN, roomy two 
bedroom, one and one-halt 
bath in nine-plex No pels. 
One-year lease 3032 Kim- 
ball (785)539-8846 

AVAILABLE AUGUST 1: 
Close lo campus One-bed- 
room apartment (785)587 
0620 

AVAILABLE JUNE I Four- 
bedroom duplex. 500 Lara- 
mie B, $285/ room, two 
baths, washer/ dryer, central 
air, dishwasher Call 
(785)410-2916 



f" tjUH BEDROOM AT 15«?1 
Leavenworth St.. $980, air, 
utilities paid. June occupan- 
cy (785)539-8401 



WILDCAT 
PROPERTY 

MANAGEMENT 

S37-2333 

l507Povntz#l 
7 BD @ $S2S 
l509Poyna#l 

I LG BD @ $523 
washer & dryer 

ALL BILLS PAID 
June or August 



-.Vtlfcto 



SUBLEASER Ni 
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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 9 



BANQUET | Top student athletes receive awards 



Continued from Page 6 

cumulative grade point 
average in undergraduate 
studies. Culbertson earned a 
3*980 in biological and agri- 
cultural engineering in addi- 
tion to being a competitor at 
the 2003 NCAA Cross Coun- 
try National Championship 
frieet. 

'Phil Hughes, associate ath- 
letics director for student ser- 
vices, spoke to the student ath- 
letes after the awards. He said 
he appreciated the athletic and 
academic accomplishments of 
those honored at the banquet. 

"Mostly, the counseling 
staff and I want to thank the 
student athletes for your deter- 
mination, your extraordinary 
efforts, day in and day out," 
Hughes said. "It's inspiring to 
see how hard you work and to 
see the consistency with which 
you apply yourselves. It's truly 
remarkable." 

Academic adviser Angelia 
Perry said she was amazed at 
the number of athletes who 
achieved enough academic 
success to be invited to the 

banquet. 

"It's very impressive to see 
the number of students who 
have achieved tremendous 
academic success as well as 
the hard work and commit- 
ment they have to their sport," 
she said 




Catrlna RiWHin | (GU ft IAN 

Tim Weiitr, | State director of ithlttlu, gives congratulatory remarks at the ninth annual 
student athlete recognition banquet. 



COLUMN I K-State football attitude is back 



Continued from Page 6 

spring football, and while the 
Spring Game itself had little 
inlhe way of offensive fire- 
works or defensive break- 
luToughs, there was much to 
be pleased with. 

I he offensive line, while 
young, may prove to be a 
strength by the time the 2005 
Season is over. 

- The defensive backs will 
b* vastly improved over last 
year's squad. Running backs 



Thomas Clayton and Carlos 
Alsup may make the loss of 
Darren Sproles easier than 
expected 

More than that, (he Spring 
Came showed K-State fans 
the attitude is back The 2005 
Wildcats have it in (heir 
heads that another 4-7 sea- 
son will not happen this fall 

The Wildcats are passion- 
ate about the game of foot- 
ball, something even the 
players on last year's team 
admit was missing in 2004. 



K-State fans may not see 
an 1 1 win season in 2005, 
but rest assured, the football 
at KSU Stadium this fall will 
be a far cry from the mess of 
the 2004 season One key 
date: Oct 8. Payback will be 
hell 



Michael Ashford will return at the fall 
IO0S sports editor and will be a senior 
in print journalism. You can email him 
at ipertittfpvb.kiu.rdu. Thank you and 
good night. 



140 killed in 5 days in Iraq 



By Thomas Wagner 

THE ASSOCIATED PM5S 

BAGHDAD, Iraq - Iraq's in- 
coming prime minister struggled 
to And a Sunni Arab to run the 
key Defense Ministry in time to 
join Iraq's first democratically 
elected government when it 
takes office Tuesday A torrent 
of bloodshed - at least 140 
killed in Eve days - followed the 
approval of a Cabinet that most- 
ly shut out members of the disaf- 
fected Sunni minority 

Disputes persisted over the 
Defense Ministry on Monday 
after Prime Minister designate 
Ibrahim al-Iaafari filled six of 
the seven Cabinet seats left un- 
decided last week, said al-Jaafari 
aide Laith Kuba. The defense 
portfolio - in charge of some 
70,000 soldiers and national 
guardsmen - is destined for a 
Sunni, part of an attempt to bal 
ance the conflicting demands of 
Iraq's many religious and ethnic 
factions 

The U.S. military, meanwhile, 
was searching for two missing 
U.S. Marine jets. The status of 
the two F/A-18 Hornet aircraft 
and their crew was not immedi- 
ately known, the military said in 
a statement Contact was lost 
with the aircraft at 10:10 p.m. 
Monday, the statement said 
There were no initial indications 
of hostile fire in the area at the 



time. 

At least 23 Iraqis were killed 
Monday, including eight soldiers 
cut down by a suicide attacker 
who blew up a truck at a check- 
point south of the capital, and 
six civilians caught in a car 
bombing that set fire to a Bagh- 
dad apartment building. 

An American soldier and a 
British soldier were killed in 
separate roadside bombing 
Monday, officials said 

The US military said the 
American was killed and anoth- 
er U.S. soldier wounded late 
Monday during a patrol south of 
Baghdad airport No other de- 
tails were immediately available. 

The British soldier from the 
12th Mechanized Brigade died 
of injures inflicted in Amarah, 
1 80 miles southeast of Baghdad. 
A total of 87 British troops have 
been killed in Iraq since the 
start of the war in 2003 

In New York, UN Secretary- 
General Kofi Annan issued a 
statement strongly condemning 
the "cruel and heartless" vio- 
lence apparently aimed at un- 
dermining Iraq's newly formed 
government 

The skyrocketing attacks are 
blamed on an insurgency be- 
lieved largely made up of mem 
bers of Iraq's Sunni minority, 
who dominated for decades 
under Saddam Hussein but were 
excluded from meaningful posi- 



tions in a partial new Cabinet 
announced Thursday. 

Al-Jaafari had promised to 
form a government that would 
win over Sunni moderates and 
reduce Sunni support for the in- 
surgency, offering them six min- 
istries and a deputy premiership. 
Bui Sunni politicians insisted 
they be given at least seven min- 
isterial portfolios. 

On Sunday, Kurdish factions 
agreed to give up one of their 
ministries to meet the Sunnis' 
demand, said Azad Junduiani, 
spokesman for the Patriotic 
Union of Kurdistan, one of two 
main Kurdish parties 

Salih al-Mutlag, head of the 
National Dialogue Council, a 
coalition of 10 Sunni factions, 
identified the Sunni deputy 
prime minister as Abid Mutlag 
al-fuburi, a former major gener- 
al in Saddam's army 

Al-Jaafari wants to have all 
positions finalized before the 
new Cabinet is sworn in Tues- 
day, Kuba said. But the han- 
dover between Prime Minister 
Ayad Allawi's caretaker govern- 
ment and the new Cabinet will 
likely go ahead even if there are 
still vacancies, the aide said 

On Jan. 30, millions of Iraqis 
risked their lives to elect the 
Shiite-dominated assembly, but 
many Sunnis boycotted the vote 
or stayed home for fear of at- 
tacks at the polls 



GOLF | Chances look up for a Wildcat trip to regionals 



Continued from Page 6 

country, took first with a score 
of 868. 

Junior Ben Kern, who tied 
for 25th with an overall score of 
229, said he remains frustrated 
with his play 

"I'm still struggling," Kern 
said "I hit the ball really well, 
but I didn't putt well" 

Fortunately for Kern and the 
rest of the squad, they might get 
another opportunity to prove 



themselves. On May 9, the 
Wildcats will receive a call from 
the selection committee an- 
nouncing the teams selected to 
compete in the NCAA Central 
Regional 

Norris said Van Cleave will 
definitely compete in the indi- 
vidual bracket, but a team invite 
is still possible 

"Our team going is pretty 
good, based on the info I'm gel- 
ting from the District Advisory 
Committee," Norris said 



Van Cleave said while it 
could go either way, K-Stale's 
chances look good 

"We didn't help ourselves 
any," Van Cleave said, "but we 
beat who we needed to beat - 
Colorado and Nebraska" 

Even if the Wildcats do not 
make the Regional, Norris said 
his players should not be disap- 
pointed 

"They've got nothing to be 
ashamed of," Norris said "These 
guys have played hard all year." 



CLASSIFIEDS 




1501 



Sublease 



NfW LISTING; Available 
•eon. Three-bedroom, two 
ball) Large living room, 
game room, computer room 
Located al 918 Bertrand 
washer/ dryer, central air. 
yard, trout porch (785)538- 
3872 

THREEOEDROOM 
HOUSE an College View 
Close to west side or cam- 
pus *■< liable June l 1840/ 
month '785)257 3488 or 
(785H79-'»22 

1HREE .■BEDROOM HOUS- 
ES, apartments, and duplex- 
es Several locations Avail 
able June, July, and August 
Pots allowed m mot! 
www rent -apm.com 
( 785)539-4367 

THREE BEDROOM, ONE 

bath house with don 
Range, refrigerator, w usher 
diver included Re*#y close 
to campus Mutt see 
(785)483-5014. 

THREE-BEDROOM, TWO 

nafh homo Clean, newly re 
rjwdnled new appliances 
QfJ'street perking and ga- 
rkf* $900 rem Flexible 
IMS* stoning dele 
(ytS)3414StG. 




NEW FINANCE Plan availa- 
ble on 2002 and newer, two 
and three-bedroom homes 
Only 11000- S2000 down. 
eaay credit approval, and M 
Hosts leas than ranting. CeK 
todiy (786)838-5841 or 
(•M£Q*-S32S. (Ternta and 
Condition* Apply), 



AVAILABLE FALL. Male or 
temele non-smoker No 
pels Three-bedroom 

Washer/ dryer Cable/ Inter 
net 1350/ month. 2038 Shir- 
ley Lane (813)568-8233. 
April 

FEMALE WANTED Fou7 
bedroom, two and one-hall 
bath Vanity/ sink in each 
room Onelourth i 
One block (ram campus 
Stan August 1 Jen 
1620)820 3745 Hannah 
t. 69-4501 

FEMAIE WANTED Share 
two-bedroom house One 
block lo campus Availably 
May 1 $250, all utilities 
paid 0*11(785)537-4947 

MALE, 1320 Fremont 
across from park, easy walk 
ID Campus/ Aggteville Two- 
bedroom, dishwasher, oven. 
all utilities paid. $316, 
(785)304-9800. 

RESPONSIBLE FEMALE 
roommates wanted tor luxu- 
ry lour-bedroom apartment 
across street Irom wesl 
campus No pet*, no smok- 
ing, »hon tease okay 
(785)776-6318 

ROOMMATE NEEDED 
June or August. $24$ 
month, one third utilities 
about S80. heat paid, across 
Irom City Park Call Adam 
(820)855-1101 

ROOMMATE WANTED as 
soon as possible $260 plus 
one-third unities Close lo 
campus Contact Anesss 

(816)806-8094 

ROOMMATES NEEDED, 
pay one-fourth untitles Nice 




BRAND NIWI Two and 
three-bedroom manufac- 
tured homes lor rani 
Comet with all appliances, 
Including washer/ dryer 
ryMf prices starting at $550 
• month Call today I 
(788)639-5841 (Terms and 
oondtttons apply). 




trXatr 2001 Bdnuftt Sen- 



beth 129,800 or beet 

(7e5)6«S-0724. 

nrfO-BEDROOM ONE 
meal* horns. Cats 
ema* ooga aUowejd Lot 
tmiimrm. MOOOor 
ol6r.(7»f)Sf7-T»DB. 



house, lenced-ln backyard 
quiet nksghborhood 
dates, (318)481-7377 

ROOMMATES WANTED 
New three- bed room, two 
bath house August Lease 
Outside pets okay. Call 
Brian (785)567 .6+47 

THREE CHRISTIAN re 
males need roommate 
•300/ month utm!ie« Includ- 
ed Washer/ dryer/ cable 
Call Kendra (785)632-71 59. 

WANTED ROOMMATES to 

share three-bedroom apart- 
ment next to campus Utilit- 
ies paid. Central air Wash- 
er/ dryer $325 each August 
I or before (785)838-5448 
(788)686-3408 (785)682- 



FEMALE WANTED lor sum- 
mer sublease Sinning May 
IS, ending in August $180/ 
month plus utilities Ten rrw- 
nUM walking distance lo 
campus Four-bedrocrn iwo 
bathroom house Washer/ 
all (785)776-9746 

JUNE/ JULY Chase Apart 
menl One bedroom in tour- 
bedroom with three guys 
S250 per monlh plus elec- 
trlclly (620)644-9527 or 
baughmanelhan O hoi mail c 
apj 

ONE BEDROOM APART 
ME NT available lor Junu 
sublease Close to campus 
Also available lor August 
Lease price negotiable Cell 
(786)34 1-8536 

ONE BEDROOM SUB- 

LEASE, pels allowed, dose 
to campus. May rent paid, 
available May 16 (913)424- 
3777 

3U8LEASER NEEDEOI 
Walk lo school and Aggie- 
vllle One-bedroom apart 
menl $275/ monlh June 
through July Available May 
23 Call Roy (785)341-8487 

TWO ROOMS available in 
tour-bedroom newer apart- 
ment. Washer/ dryer includ- 
ed Low utilities Close to 
campus and Aggievtlte 
Rent $287 per month Call 
(820)286-5982 Of (820)783- 
2200 

TWO-BEDROOM APART. 
MENT available lor summer 
$520/ month Close to Ag- 
gievllte Available June 
1006 Bluemonl (786)537- 
4426 

TWO-BEOROOM. ONE 
bath available now through 
ir July 28 Pool and laundry hv 
ctseat. One block from cam- 
pus $896 per month 
(7WW31-9191 




Irj TiiiT-ij\ l 





SUMMER SUBLEASE two 

a pa rtm en t. Cloa« 
to campus Call Chris tor be 
1**S (913)488-0118. 



FULLTIME SUMMER help 
wanted Root truss manu- 
facturing plant, 5107 Murray 
Rd, (786)776-6081 

SUMMER HAY help Long 
tours. Good MS (7S5)M7- 



3101 



Help Wanted 

The Collegian cannot veri- 
ty the financial potential ol 
advertisement a in the Em- 
ployment/Career classifi- 
cation. Readers are ad- 
vised to approach any 
such employment oppor 
(unity with reasonable 
Caution The Collegian 
urges our readers lo con- 
tact the Seller Business 
Bureau. 501 SE Jefferson, 
Topeka, KS 66607 1190 
(765)232-0454 

Manhattan City Ordinance 
4814 assures every par- 
son equal opportunity In 
securing end holding em- 
ploy menl In eny Held of 
work or labor for which 
he/ she Is properly quali- 
fied regardless of race, 
sex. military status, disa- 
bility, religion, age, color, 
national origin or ances- 
try Violations should be 
reported to In* Director of 
Human Resources al City 
Hall, (785)687 -2441 

'BAH TENDING 1 $300 a day 
potential No experience 
necessary Training provid- 
ed Call 1-800 965-6520 ext 
144 

ATTN: ARCHITECTURE 
students. Los Angeles - 
based design firm In need 
of draftsman. Looking for 
third or fourth-year stu- 
dent tor part-time poai 
lion. Make Los Angeles In- 
come with Ken ess living 
coat. Must be proficient 
with AutoCad 2002 or later 
and be sole to produce 
floor plana and detailed 
sections. Call JNH De- 
signs (310)784-9188, ask 
for Jefod. 

COL DRIVERS FOR SUM- 
MER WORK Covan World- 
Wide Moving IS looking tor 
cottage students with a 
Class A or B Commercial 
Driver's License for lull -lima 
summer work. Need lo stay 
In town tor summer, slay m 
shape, and save some 
cash? Ores! Internship alter 
native and take advantage 
of your existing lease/ rental 
agreement Job is to per 
lorm pecking, loading, and 
delivery ol household goods 
to our military and commer- 
cial customers along with 
driving CDL vehicle to s lo- 
cal jobsita Apply as soon sa 
possible at 818 S. 11th St. 
on Fori Riley Blvd. Very 
competitive $9 00 to $11 00 
hourly/ Incentive wages Job 
begins immediately follow- 
ing Spring finals weak 
through summer and option- 
al part-time worts In Fas of 
2006. Equal Opportunity 
Employer. 

HELP WANTED tor custom 
harvesting, combine opera- 
tors and truck drivers Guar 
. Good summer 
Celt (970)483-7490 



Help Wanted 

DEPENDABLE ENTHUSI- 
ASTIC individual needed tor 
a leasing agent position at 
Hie new Aggie Village apart- 
ments Full-lime summer 
position, with pan -lime 

ivailabte now and in 
the tail semester Must be 
willing to work most weex 

it interested, please 
apply al McCukough Devel- 
opment. Inc. 210 N 4th 
Street. Suite C. Manhattan 
KS 

GET PAID for your opin- 
ions 1 Eam $16- $125 and 
more par survey 1 
www moneyforsurvoysco 
m 

GRADUATE ASSISTANT- 
SHIP m Educational Innova- 
tion and Evaluation, May- 
August, must be enrolled m 
six graduate level credit 
hours See 

www ksu.ftdu/oeio lor de- 
Htnption and application m 
Slructions Email 

cahuma n Okau.edu tor more 
intoriMtton 

GREAT OPPORTUNITY 
Seeking a live in nanny, ref- 
erences a must, babysitting 
experience necessary 
(765)637-9699 

GREAT SUMMER income 
Asbasloit Abatement Work- 
ers needed 40 hours ol free 
training la required. Class 
starts May 31 rune through 
June 3, 8.00- 4:30pm 
$11 60 per hour Contact 
Laborers Local 1290, 7*0 
More, lor an application or 
call (785)537-1 587 

HARVEST HELP wanted 
We are currently looking tor 
temporary wheat harvest 
help in Wichita KS. Job In- 
work. and grain 
$9 00/ hour over- 
time is required Contact 
Deprive Grains Company. 
Wichita, KS. (800)733-8782, 
ask tor Nat, Karri or Dannie 
Equal Opportunity Employ 
ar 

LUBE TECH/ Automotive 

Maintenance Specie 1 1st 
Part time positions available 
immediately Call <7BS)$6S- 
5280 with personal Intorma- 
Hon 

MCCULLOUGM DEVELOP- 
MENT, inc H now accepting 
applications for an aatiMam 
maintenance technician 
This will be a futi-llme posi- 
tion in the summer with part- 
time hours svsliable now 
interested individuals pleas* 
fst oul an employment appli- 
cation at 210 N. Fourth St . 
C, Manhattan, KS. 



POSITION Look- 
ing for a responsible Individ- 
ual 10 watch our three chil- 
dren at our home beginning 
June I Monday- Friday 
8:30- 5:30 Ages are 4 S, 
10 References required 
Ptoses OKN Kevin at (785) 
564-1907, 



3101 



Help Wanted 

MOVIE EXTRAS/ MODELS 
Needed! Young lacee need- 
ed to lit a variety ol fobs' 
Candidates needed lor 
Crowd and background 
scenes tor local productions 
No experience required I All 
looks neededl Up lo $22 
hourly' Call (800)280-0177 
now lor more information 

NOW HIRING three interns 
lor summer Open to all ma- 
jors Gain career skills Ac- 
counting, public relations, 
:ig, communication, 
travel, average earns $700/ 
weak. Call (785)31 '-0455 

NOW HIRING Vista Dnve 
in, a locally owned and op- 
erated quick service restau- 
rant is adding lo our team 
Individuals must have a pos- 
itive attitude and be able to 
multitask and work wen with 
others in a last paced envi- 
ronment We have multiple 
pari -lime and a lew lull- time 
positions available, must be 
able 10 work during the day 
KSU students encouraged 
We otter meal discounts. 
flexMa hours end promote 
Irom wrthtn Apply in person 
at 191 1 Tuttte Creek Btvd 

PART TIME COMMUNICA- 
TIONS Assistant needed to 
work 10- 15 hours per week 
This position will be respon- 
sible for helping Communi- 
cations Manager to imple- 
ment the communication 
strategy ol the organization 
Candidate must possess ex- 
cellent communication, or- 
ganization, clerical and com- 
puter skills Website tech- 
nology experience a plus. 
Candidate must be familiar 
with a Macintosh, using 
Quark and Photoshop as 
wall aa Microsoft Office ap- 
plication* Sand or deliver 
return* with two professio- 
nal reference* lo Manhattan 
Are* Chamber of Corn- 
mom*. Attention Dene Huff. 
801 Poynu Ave.. Manhat- 
tan. KS 68502, $8.80/ hour 
Resume deadline May 8 

REFLECTION PHOTOGRA 
PHY I* looking for a aerl-mo- 
livated outgoing Individual 
tor ■ toH-Hme sales person/ 
office assistant Musi be 
aval lab I* Tuesday- Satur- 
day Call (786)639- 1800. 

STEEL $ Pip* Supply Com- 
pany has sn opening for • 
Systems Analyst. Po*Wori Is 
responsible for 
process design, 
training, and support Quajt- 
ticationa induo* B S degree 
in business, computer sd- 
eno*. or related IktW Must 
have general knowledge of 
buaweei processes Candi- 
dates should submit resume 
to Personnel Department 
Systems Analyst, P O Box 
1888, Manhattan. KS 
68606 Equal Opportunity 
Employer 



3101 



Help Wanted 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 
Inc. has a pari lime position 
'or a Macintosh technician 
available Immediately. The 
lech support learn maintains 
aboul 50 Macintosh work- 
slations. providing software 
support as well as perform- 
ing general hardware main- 
tenance Appacams should 
have some experience wdh 
Mac OSX server and be fa- 
miliar with design software 
such aa Adobe Photoshop. 
Adobe InDesign and Quark 
Express Any aipenence 
with networking, program- 
ming or with UNIX/Linux is 
also helpful Pay starts at 
$7 50 per hour with the op- 
portunity io advance Only 
students currently enrolled 
si spring 2006 tor al least 
sis hours at Kansas Slate 
University can be consid- 
ered Vou are Strongly en 
eouragad to contact Michael 
Yops at (785)532-0733 or 
stop by Kedrie 1 1 S tor more 
information about the posi- 
tion Applications may be 
picked up in Kedxte 113 or 
118 or online al 
tmsJlSBuh ksu oduisectvflu 
plication rtlrni Please in 
elude your current class 
schedule 

STUDENT TECHNOLOGY 
Assislanl in Technology 
Service Canter Assist wnh 
installation and maintenance 
of technology classroom 
equipment Prefer candidate 
with Audio Visual equipment 
and computer experience 
Hours are I- 10pm Monday 
through Fnday ?0 hours p*r 
week during semester*, run- 
time during summer and 
breaks. $7.00 hour. Contact 
Anthony Phillips si 
(786)532-3341 for further in- 
formation Submit applica- 
tion in room 1121 Ee*1 Sis- 
dlum 

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travel end *nd-of-****on 
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SUMMER CAMP JOBS IN 
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Flying G Ranch Live and 
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backpacking, crafts nature, 
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Late May early August 
Competitive salary, housing 
meets, health insurance, 
travel and end -ol season 
bonuses To apply, visit 
www guiscoutsmile'i- 
mpiobs or caH (303)607- 
4819 

SUMMER INTERNSHIP 
ALTERNATIVE-MOVER 

Covan World-Wide Moving 
is looking lor college stu- 
denls for summer work Ei- 
cesent opportunity to slay in 
town lor summer, stay m 
shape, and save some cash 
or if you need an internship 
alternative or summer em- 
ployment Helpers and 
packers lo perform packing 
and loading ol household 
good to our military and 
commercial customers No 
CDL required Apply as 
soon as possible at 615 S 
11th Slreel on Fort Riley 
Blvd Very competitive $7 50 
lo $9 00 hourly/ incentive 
wages Job begins Immedi- 
ately following spring flnels 
week through summer 
Equal Opportunity Employ 
ar. 



Bu**ne*e 



The Collegian cannot veri- 
fy the financial potential of 
sdv*rtl semen ts tn the Em- 
ployment/Career els i sill 
cation Readers ar* ad- 
vised to approseh any 
such fUMnaa* opportuni- 
ty with reasonable cau- 
tion, Th* Cottoglan urge* 
our niidtr* to contact th* 
Sattar But Inst* Burttu, 
SOI 81 J**r*r*on, Topeka. 
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Page 10 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Tuesday, May 3, 2005 



VET MED | College celebrates 100 years of teaching 




Lindiey Baumin | COIISUAN 

Charles B*r1c, third y«r wt m«J student r«ei»« hi* white toat a on* of 106 participating in the College of Veterinary Medicine's fifth 
annual White Coat ceremony on April 29. 



Continued In mi Page 1 

garage It was small and not so- 
phisticated." 

WOMEN IN THE COLLEGE 
OF VETERINARY MEDICINE 

The first woman to graduate 
In m the college was Helen Richl. 
who graduated in 1932 Another 
woman graduated two years later 
illege did not have any 
mure feiii.'ik graduates until, 
1944 

However, women now out- 
number the men in the school 
two Up < KM 

in the pasl, women were ex 
peeted to stay at home and raise 
the family." Elmore said. "This has 
changed for ail profes- 

He said the III IT HI II in the 
number of women entering the 
field of veterinary medicine has 
come from a trend in society 

"Far more women are going to 
college now than they used to," 
Elmore said. "In the late 70s or 
early 80s, women realized they 
more welcome A bw 
women started coming and more 



realized they could do so if they 
wanted to" 

THE COLLEGE OF 
VETERINARY MEDICINE 
TODAY 

K -State's College of Veterinary 
Medicine now has a rabies lab, a 
diagnostic lab and is a teaching 
hospital 

Students in the veterinary 
medicine program are now given 
experience with more than just 
agricultural animals 

"We strictly prepare men and 
women to take care of all ani- 
mals,' Elmore said "Wt teach 
students about clinical practice 
and now have major research 
programs We conduct research 
and encourage students to have 
research careers" 

The College of Veterinary 
Medicine is now in three build- 
ings: Coles, Trotter and Mosier 
halls 

"It's extremely big compared 
to what it used to be," Elmore 
said 

The halls have classrooms, a li- 
brary, lecture halls and a teaching 



hospital diagnostic facility 

THE FUTURE OF THE 
COLLEGE OF VETERINARY 
MEDICINE 

Elmore said the college should 
continue to build on the founda- 
tion it has formed since 1905. 

"We'll continue to produce 
competent veterinarians." he said 
"We'll see far more students going 
into all of the things veterinary 
medicine has to offer" 

Elmore said he hopes l«t see 
more f -*i join the public 
health ai. v ' ^elds 

"There <1t huge needs all 
across the board." he said 

The College of Veterinary 
Medicine is expanding and El- 
more said students should realize 
the opportunities available 
through the coll. 

"We have a vision far bmaden- 
mg what veterinarians do and 
helping our new graduates realize 
they can do these things," he said. 
"Virtually every one of our stu 
dents have job offers We think 
that veterinary medicine has a lot 
to offer" 




YOU MAY QUALIFY FOR LOW-FEE 
LEGAL SERVICES: 



\ 



h 



Divorce: starting at $573.00 
Bankruptcy: $737.00 

Advance Directives Packages: $100.00 Includes 
Living Will 

Health Care Power of Attorney 
Financial Durable Power of Attorney 

Expungement: $182.00 
Stepparent Adoption: $402.50 



'AH prices above include the Court filing fees 

Call Kansas Lesal Services, Inc 

(785) 537-2943 or 1-800-723-6953 

Roger McCollister, Executive Director 



AMENDMENT I Companies want clarification 



Continued from Page 1 

amendment Cormack said he 
was pleasantly surprised by resi- 
dents' reactions. 

"We mainly walked door-to- 
door and sent out mailings to 
educate people," Cormack said. 
"People were generally unaware 
of how the amendment might 
affect them I think the close 
vote in Manhattan was a reflec- 
tion of our door-lo-door talk- 
ing. 

Indeed, the vote was close in 
Manhattan - a predominantly 
Republican area - with 54 per- 
cent favoring the amendment 
and 46 percent opposing it. 

Leigh Fine, former president 
of K Stale's Queer /Straight Al- 
liance, a group also aligned with 
the FHHRP to caution the 
Manhattan area about the 
amendment, said the heterosex- 
ual community will eventually 
be shocked by amendment's 
power "Heterosexual people 
in Kansas are going to be sur 
prised by the ramifications," Fine 
said "Heterosexuals are voting 
against their own rights when 
they think they're voting against 
gay rights 



Gay marriage has been illegal 
in Kansas since 1867, according 
to Chapter 23 1 1 in the Kansas 
Legislature, which states, "The 
marriage contract is to be con- 
sidered in law as a civil contract 
between two parties who are of 
opposite sex" Fine said the new 
amendment creates more severe 
limitations, stretching beyond 
the gay community 

"For one, it's going to make it 
harder for people to get a di- 
vorce because Section B made it 
unlawful to offer any benefits," 
Fine said 

"It's also going to affect busi- 
nesses coming to Kansas - they 
aren't going to want to come to 
Kansas 

"They want to go where they 
can get qualified people for the 
job, and the amendment makes 
it more of a challenge It'll be 
easier for them to go to Califor 
nia or Massachusetts" 

Still, mere are two sides to 
every story. Kansas Attomey 
General Phil! Kline said in a 
press release issued April 6 that 
he doesn't anticipate the amend- 
ment causing rifts between com- 
panies and employees 

"It is my opinion that the 



amendment, when it takes ef- 
fect, will not affect the ability of 
private employers and others to 
extend employment benefits in 
the manner they see fit. 

Clause B of the amendment 
will only prohibit the state from 
creating a legally recognized re-; 
lationship between same- sex 
couples, commonly referred to 
as civil unions, which in legat 
terms has the same benefits inci- 
dent to marriage," Kline said in 
the release 

Ltndsey [ones, a member of 
Campus Crusade for Christ, said 
she sees no problems 

"I am a Christian - I do not 
support homosexual couples 
being recognized as a union," 
[ones said 

Despite differing opinions, 
the amendment still stands 

Cormack said it will take 
some time to change the minds 
of those favoring the amend- 
ment. However, the issue is not 
dead. 

"Kansas was a battleground 
that fought over being a free or 
slave state," Cormack said "This 
amendment is fundamentally 
opposed to the principles of 
Kansas. 1 



r 






I Q iKI ny Staff Applications 

We are sending out the 2005-2006 Faculty /Staff Parking Permit 

applications via e-mail. You should receive an e-mail that will allow 

you to fill out your form and then print and return it to Parking 

Services. An actual signature Is mandatory. 

If you do not receive this e-malt. please look at our web site, 

ksu edu/parking. and under forms, fill out the 2005-2006 Faculty/Staff 

Parking Permit application. After you sign the form, please return 

via campus mall to Parking Services, 









You may use your new permit as soon as you receive it, Please 
destroy your old permit after displaying your new one. 

Your permits will be sent to your campus address after July 1 , 2005. If 

you have returned the application 2 weeks or more ahead of July 

31, 2005, you will receive your new permit before you present permit 

has expired If you have any questions, please contact 

Parking Services at 532-7275. 






-/" 




"\ 





K-State Student 
Specials! 



Large 

Up-to 2 Topping 
Pizza 

NoHmll 




3 Medium 

Two-Topping Pizzas 



15 




2615 Anderson 



537-1400 



« 






J 



«t*^-*** -?**:' 




/^K A N S A S STATE 

Collegian 



INSID 

Remei 
toys, n 
the 1980s 



Sub Exp Date -/- 
Jan sas Stale H, SIO nca1 Socw» 
Newspaper Seclion 
p O Bo* 3585 
Topeta KS 66601 



O 1 



,# 






www k^t.itcL i illcgiancom 



Wednesday, Mav 4, 2(H>5 



Vol. 109. Nn. 156 



Fort Riley soldier 
murder trial set 



By Krlsti Hurl* 

KANSAS SWKOlltGIAN 

Two deaths in September 
2004 led to charges arraigned to 
Sgt Aaron Stanley on Monday 

The deaths were in Clay 
County, Kan , and another sol- 
dier, Sgt Eric Colvin, also faces 
related charges 

Stanley was charged with 
conspiracy to commit murder, 
twu specifications of premedi- 
tated murder, wrongful posses- 
sion with (he intent to distrib- 
ute marijuana, wrongful 
distribution and use of metham 



Siheta mines, absence without 
eave, violations of orders re 
striding him to Port Kiley, and 
adultery. 

Commanding General of the 
24lh Infantry Division Dennis 
Hardy referred the charges with 
which Stanley was charged. 

Stanley's trial has been set 
for )une 6 at Fort Riley. 

A news release I nun Fort 
Riley's Public Altai rs Office said 
that Colvin'l case has yet to be 
referred to trial, but both Stan- 
ley and Culvin are being held in 
pre-trial confinement in Geary 
County 



Rader pleads innocent in Wichita BTK case 



By ftoxana Hegwnan 

■.XIATIQPMSS 

A judge entered a plea of in 
nocent Tuesday for Dennis 
Rader, a fnnner church leader 
and city employee who is 
charged with 10 counts of first- 
degree murder in the BTK seriu! 
killing case 

Rader chose to stand mute 
during the brief arraignment and 
asked District Cuurt fudge Gre 
gory Waller to enter the plea for 
him. 

Waller entered the innocent 
plea and set .1 trial dale fur [une 
27, although most court ob- 
servers expect the trial to be 
postponed fur several months 

Rader. till, .1 former city com- 
pliance office bom suburban 



Park City, was arrested Feb, 25 
and charged in 10 deaths linked 
in the acral killer known as BTK, 
which stands for "Bind. Torture, 
Kill" 

In an unusual maneuver. Dis- 
trict Attorney Note Foulston 
stood directly in (runt oi 1 
and formally sent. I papers |o 
him for (he death of Dolora 
Davis, 62, who was abducted 
from her Park City home on km 

19. I9k4i. ami found Mangled 

(WO weeks laler 

Foulston told Rader she was 
going tn seek a separate sentenc- 
ing procedure in thai 1 ate be 
it met OOC u! all of three 
criteria - ii was premeditated, he 
committed thecii ndar 

: 1 he crime una part* 
heinous 




Rader 



Foulston 
told Rader she 
would seek the 

hard 40 sen- 

* net in that 
case, meaning 
40 years with 
mil a chance 
of parole 

\s Rader 
WU being 

taken out of the courtroom, one 
of victim's family members was 
heard to say, "Don't worry, you 
(MMll last thai long" 

In a news conference after the 
hearing. Foulstun said Kansas 
law when the oilier nine hout- 
eides attributed to BTK killer oc- 
curred would allow a sentence of 
Itfe in prison, but permit parole 
within 1 5 ) 



Davis death occurred after 
Kansas law changed to allow the 
hard 40. she said 

Foulston said she thought a 
trial would help Wichita-area 
residents recover from the trau- 
ma of the BTK killings 

*l look forward to a trial of 
this case because it is important 
for people to know. . to be able to 
say it is over," she said 

l*ublic defender Steve Osbum 
said Rader' s defense team is con- 
sidering seeking a change of 
venue but had not made a final 
decision 

He said attorneys do not an- 
ticipate making Rader's compe- 
tency a part of (he detCOM 

"We still have a lot of discov- 
ery left," Osbum said. "Most has 
yet to be seen" 






Mourners 
remember 
Dubois' life 



By Krirttn Roderick 

KANSAS SIMf (OUIHAN ' 

family, friends, faculty and 
students gathered in the Union 
Little Theater at the K- State Stti 
■ lent Union I" remember the life 
1 if former interior architect 11 re 
pPOfeeaot laities Dub 

Dubois, 55, died April 10 after 
a short battle with pulmonary fi- 
brosis 

Tim Lindemuth said he was 
surprised when he heard Dubois 
died 

"When I Heard of his passing, 
it was a great shock,' he said "I 
had no idea that he was •' 

Lindemuth, editor of the 
K Stater magazine, met Dubois 
more than a decade ago when 
they were part of a team whose 
goal was to beautify neighbor- 
hoods around Manhaltan. 

"He was concerned about 
older neighborhoods around 
Manhattan," Lindemuth said. "I 
saw him as an advocate in the 
community He was very 
thought provoking and he had 
such a passion I will always re- 
member his wonderful smile' 

Lindemuth said si 11 den Is can 
be reminded of Dubois when 
they see a sofa on a front porch 
that legally can't be there because 
of his work in getting a city-wide 
bcautifi cation act passed 

In 1 he weeks prior to his 
death, Dubois was elected to his 
fifth term as a member uf Faculty 
Senate 

St* DUBOIS ray 12 




j»»»yn Brown I fOttltlAN 
After the memorial servke t« former ardsi 
tetture professor James Dubois, hit widow, 
Mjrianne Dubois, hugj Stephen Murphy, 
longtime Mend jnd department head of 
Interior architecture and product design. 
Mines Dubois died April 10 after * buttle 
with pulmonary fibrous, a lung disease. 



Society of noise 




Photoi by Drew No» | CDUG0U 

6nan Williams, awrwr of N(C "Nightly News," delivers the 1 s*th Uivdon tenure Tuesday morning at Mrfam Auditorium Williams took over for anchor torn ftrok jw last December, 



NBC anchor says Americans 
can avoid opposing views 



By Amy Preston 

KANSAS SJAtf COt If MAN 

It's all about the individual 
In today s society, the new an- 
chor o( "NBC Nighlly News 
said Tuesday morning during 
the 1 3Sth Landon Lecture 

Brian Williams, anchor of 
'NBC Nighlly News with Brian 
Williams" wanted his lecture 10 
be a simple conversation be 
fween himself and the audience 
iii id to highlight the individu 
jlisiic way] 1 if our society, 
namely the fact that choice has 
led to customization, he said 

"In our society uf self, of 
great wealth, it's ihe emphasis 
of the individual over the col- 
lective," Williams said. "It's pos- 
sible in head off, live life, and 
see and hear the media that we 
only agree with We can now 
avoid things we don't want 
to hear 



"Our age is marked by so 
much noise, so much chatter - 
and it's on all the time tkcause 
of this, no one idea can he- 
heard'' 

Williams recalled Ihe nightly 
newscasts he watched as a 
child, when there were only 
three choices for news instead 
of the hundreds available today. 
He said he remembers looking 
over at his neighbors houses 
and seeing the blue glow of the 
news stations coming over the 
television set. 

"We were in our own homes 
but we were together,* Williams 
said "It made us one It was 
something we had in common 
with the people living in apart- 
ment 13, or Mrs Miller or Mrs 
lenkins in the next home 

"The blue glow these days is 
more of a strobe light " 

1 nstead of people coming to 
work talking about last night's 




Brian Williams, anchor of NK 'Nighlly News," tits next to Student Body President Michael 
Bum',, senior In agricultural economics, while waiting to speak Tuesday morning. 



news, Williams said, they come 
to work with a variety of stories 

"We sure have given viewers 
choice," he said. "These days it's 
possible to have 600 employees 
come to work and have not 
shared the same experience at 
all. We were all watching some- 
thing else 

In addition, because n( soci- 



ety's customization to the nidi 
vidual, Williams said journalism 
has been an even easier profes- 
sion to obtain Professional 
journalists train and work by 
ethical standards, but the words 
on the Internet carry the same 
weight to the public, he said 

See lECTURf Page U 



Increase 
expected to 
be less than 
10 percent 



By Wendy Haun 
KANSAS STATf CM IfGIAN 

Next year's tuition proposal 
has been submitted to (lie Board 
of Regents, but details are not 
being disclosed 

Bruce Shubert, associate vice 
president for administration and 
finance, said the university will 
not release the tuition proposal 
before Ihe Board of Regents 
meeting on May 19 

We have submitted a propos- 
al in the Board that is consistent 
wit!. ".reasea in 

past, but we don't want to release 
il before die board meeting," Shu- 
bert said 

Shubert did say that the pro 
posed tuition increase was less 
than 10 percent, and the in-state 
and out-of-state tuitions will in- 
crease in equal percentages. 

Tyson Moore, junior in infor- 
mation services and Student Sen- 
ate chair, said the tuition is not 
fixed yel because there is still de- 
bate on how much money 1 he- 
university will receive 

"The legislature is still debat 
ing die funding bill We aren't ex- 
nctly sure how much higher edu- 
cation will get for next year but 
we have a very good idea that it 
won't be very drastic," Moore 
said 

He said the process for decid- 
ing tuition is a work-in-progress. 

"The administration looks at 
what the budget needs will be for 
next year. They factor in inflation 
and other costs and make a pre- 
diction (o what the legislature will 
give higher education as a whole." 
he said 

"They look at the governor's 
budget proposal, which comes 
out in January, and they look at 
how much funding K-State will 
gel Then (hey DOOM up with a 
dollar figure or percentage that 
the tuition will need to be to 
make up for the funding." 

MOOR said discussion with 
student leaders is also important 

They lalk to the student gov- 
ernment leaders about what tlieir 
ideas are for the next year - what 
they want the tuition to be and 
how it coincides with the five- 
year plan," he said. 

After the proposal is made, it's 
all in the hands of the Regents 

"The Board debates the pro- 
posal and the details are ironed 
out and the board passes it at the 
June meeting,' he said. 

The 2005-06 year will be the 
fourth year in the five-year tuition 
increase plan 



Today 



O 



a 



High 70 
Low 46 



Thursday 



High 73 
Low 54 



Iran working on nukes 

Iran declared Tuesday that rt it deter - 
mined to pursue all legal areas of 
nuclear technology, Including uranium 
enrichment Itanian foreign Minister 
Kamal Kharrazi said his government Is 
'eager* to provide guarantees 1t1.11 Its 
nuclear -fuel program will serve only 
peaceful purposes. 



NEWS HIGHLIGHTS 

Wars straining military 

The U.S. military may not be able to 
win any wars as quickly as planned 
because the conflict; in Iraq and 
Afghanistan have strained Its 
manpower, the nation's top military 
officer told Congress Gen. Richard 
Myers described the military as in * 
period of Increased risk 






DON'T FORGET 



Iraqis sworn in 

Prime Minister Ibrahim al-laafan 


There are free ke 
cream cones in the 


Hate 1H. 


pledged to unite Itaq's rival ethnic 
and religious factions and fight 
terrorism as the nations first democ 


Union Courtyard from 1 1 
a.m. to 1 p m today 


The Department of 
Musk is having a faculty 
artist for its Phi Mu 


ratically elected government was 
sworn in Tuesday amid escalating 
violence 


IfutiwtltMl da» is 

from? to 7:4S tonight in 


Alpha American Musk 
Concert at 7:30 tonight 

in All faiths Chapel 


* 







I> 






. 



Page 2 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Wednesday, May 4, 2005 




Puzzles | Eugene Sheffer 



ACROSS 

1 Walters 
handoul . 

5 Blond 
shade 

S Qua! Fain 
rhyme 
schema 
13 Start ol 
Oregon's 
motto 

(laU 

13 Luau 
bowlful 

14 Sumtnale 

15 America's 
Cup 
activity 

17 PC 
pidure 

II Vltarrttus 

looks 
is Muddled 

21 "Go, 
leaml" 

22 Location 

23 Navy big- 
wig (Abbr.) 

26 Wield 
2ft Rote lor 

JacMe 
31 Peregn 

Mil 
33 Archery 

bow wood 

35 Tea 
ipoonfut, 
maybe 

36 Marilyn ot 
(he 5th 
Dimen- 
sion 



38 Try me 

tea 
40 Boundary 
•1 Island 

dance 
43 Pan ol 

UCLA 
45 Curtain 

■II a ma 

live 
47 Be 

phnan- 

throptc 

51 Roster 

52 Hopi 

MM 

54 Plus- lire 
fashion 



$9 Elbow 
counter- 
part 

DOWN 
t The Say 

Hey 
tod" 

2 Verve 

3 Pleasant 

4 Xonles- 



atnoar 

5 Sans 
originality 

6 Trinity 
member 

7 Tlmeiot 



S5DDT- 
banning 
org 

Si Young 

ham 

57 Director 
played by 

Depp 
SB Speck 



8 1997 
Spielberg 

movie 

9 Reality- 
TV 

decision- 
maker 

10 Medicinal 
plant 



Solution time: 21 mina. 



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compan- 
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sense ol 
power 

27 •Certainly 

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preceder 

MHelghiot 
fashion? 

32 Onhorw- 
back 

34 Unsanc- 
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in a smite 

37 in need of 
repair 

39 Milne 
tnjlrv 

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ed 

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cut 

45 Wasted 

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transport 

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limo 
49 Piece ot 



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royal 
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53 GIs' mail 
address 



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CAMPUS CHRONICLES 

HEADLINES FROM THE NATION'S UNIVERSITIES 

Rhode Island students invent page-turner 



v i 



<? 




KINGSTON, Rl. - A six-person team of Uni- 
versity of Rhode Island engineering and business 
students invented an automated page-turner 

Senior Terence Malaghan and recent UR1 grad- 
uate Adam Tillinghast presented the page-tumcr at 
the ninth annual "March Madness for the Mind" 
event, as part of the National Collegia le Inventors 
and Innovators Alliance conference last March in 
San Diego The device was one of 14 student inven- 
tn his presented at the national conference 

Teams from Brown University and the Massa 
chusetts Institute of Technology were also present 
at the conference 

They created the device as part of a yearlong en I 
laborativc business and engineering course taught 
by biomedical engineering professor Ying Sun, 
business professor Robert Comerford and mechan- 
ical engineering professor Musa louanch. 

"The purpose is not for kids to come Up with in- 
ventions," Comerford said. "The purpose of this 
course is to demonstrate the advantages of business 
and engineering majors* simultaneous input to a 
product -development process. They learn a lot 
from each other" 

This team began working on the device in fall 
2003. They received an additional $1 0,000 grant 
from NCIIA last June to further the product's de- 
velopment. 

Students involved in the course originally re- 
ceived a $50,000 grant from NCIIA to pay for trav- 
el and technical costs. 

The team thought of the idea of a page-turner 
after speaking to several doctors, therapists and pa- 
tients at Kent County Memorial Hospital 

Malaghan said the page-turner originally was 
designed to help people with limited upper mobili- 
ty- 

DUTCH OVEN COULD BECOME NEW TEXAS 
SYMBOL 

LUBBOCK, Texas - The state snack, tortilla 
chips and salsa, may be a challenge lo make in a 
Dutch oven. 



Illustration* by Brandon Brewster | (otUGMN 



The Dutch oven is on its way to becoming Texas' 
official state culinary instrument, which would add 
the stout, three-leg, cast-iron pot to a growing list of 
state symbols, including bluebonnets, square danc- 
ing, Guadalupe bass, armadillo and rodeos. 

According to State Resolutions HRC77 and 
SCR9, the "Dutch oven" resolution, throughout the 
course of Texas history, Uie pot was used by Span- 
ish explorers, early settlers, ranchers and chuck 
wagon cooks. 

According to Merriam-Webster Online Dictio- 
nary, a Dutch oven is a cast-iron kettle that is used 
for baking in an open fire 

"I think it would be good because of the impact 
the Dutch oven had in Texas history, especially his- 
tory of this area," Allen Johnson, adviser for Pan- 
Handlers, a chapter of the Lone Star Dutch Oven 
Society, said 

"We make a lot of things strictly from raw mate- 
rials, just like youd have to in the older days" 

Historically, the ovens were heated using 
mesquite - or "cow chips" - because of the lack of 
trees, especially in western Texas, Johnson said. 
Today, most people 
use charcoal 

Johnson said he 
began using the 
ovens to cook 
Eve years ago as 
a way to create, 
healthy, flavor 
ful meals. 

The 18 fami- 
ly society serves 
as a way to share 
Dutch oven skills 
and recipes. 

"We do it for 
fun, fellowship and good 
food. Our desire is to preserve the art of doing this,'' 
he said 

"When people realize how good of food comes 
out of those black puts, they're hooked.'' 




The blotter 

Arrests in Riley County 

Reports «t taken directly from Riley County Police 
Department's daily logs. The Collegian does not list 
wheel kxfcs or minor traffic violations because of 
spacer 



Monday, May 2 

■ At 11 :« am., Wade Harper, 237 Ridge Drive, 
basement apartment, was arrested for theft and 
burglary. Bond was set at $1,000. 

■ At 2:30 p.m., rtilario Duncan If, Ogden, Kan., was 
arrested for failure to appear. Bond was set at $100 

■ At 5:30 p.m., Xavier Taylor, Junction City, Kan., was 
arrested for burglary and criminal damage to property. 
Bond was set at $2,500. 

■ At 5:50 p.m., Stacy Jackson, 1300 Martatt Ave.. No. 
107, was arrested for failure to appear. Bond was set at 
$5,000. 



The planner 

Campus bulletin board 

Campus Calendar Is the Collegian's campus bulletin 
board service. Items in the calendar can be published up 
to three times. Items might not appear because of space 
constraints but are guaranteed to appear on the day of 

the activity. To place an item in the Campus Calendar, 
stop by Kedzle 1 16 and nil oui a form or e-mail the news 
editor at bttlktmsmpubiau.edti by 1 1 a.m. two days 
before It Is to run 

■ The Graduate School announces the final oral 
defense of the doctoral dissertation ol Lleceng Zhu at 
8:10 a.m. today in Waters Hall 

■ There are free ice cream cones in the Union 
Courtyard from 1 1 a.m. to 2 p.m. today 

■ The Graduate School announces the final oral 
defense of the doctoral dissertation of Ya Ding at 1 p.m. 
today in Waters 342. 

■ The Graduate School announces the final oral 
defense of the doctoral dissertation of Shane Kasten at 
1:30 p.m. today in the Chemistry/Biochemistry building, 
room 437. 

■ The Graduate School announces the final oral 
defense of the doctoral dissertation of Sadia Marram 
Malik at 1:30 p.m today in Waters 129. 

■ AH 2005 graduates (May, August and December} 
are invited to the Ssntor Send-off from 4 to 6 p.m 
Thursday at the Alumni Center North Terrace. 



Corrections and 
clarifications 

Corrections and clarifications appear in this space. If you, 
see something that should be corrected, call news 
editor Knsti Huda at 532-6556 or e -mail 

(Ottqi<mespi)bhuedu Z 



Kansas State Collegian 

(USPS 291 020) The Kansas State Collegian, a student 
newspaper at Kansas Slate University, is published by 
Student Publications Inc, Kedile 103, Manhattan, KS . 
66506. The Collegian is published weekdays dunng the 
school year and on Wednesdays during the summer. ~ 
Periodical postage is paid at Manhattan, KS 66502 
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Kansas State 
Collegian, circulation desk, Kedrie 101, Manhattan, KS 
66506-7167. 
© Kansas State Collegian, 2005 



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Wednesday, May 4, 2005 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 3 



Holocaust victims remembered 



k *\M* Suit t 

till I HIIMM. 



USKedzie 532-6660 




By Mdltsa Baier 

KANSAS WE COUEW* 

The members of the Hillel 
Jewish Student Organization are 
commemorating the lives and 
deaths of the victims who per 
ished in the Holocaust 

Yom Ha'Shoah, die Holocaust 
Remembrance Day is celebrated 
each year according to the He- 
brew calendar, usually falling 
within the first week of May. This 
year, Yom Ha'Shoah will be cele- 
brated on May 6. 

In recognition of Yom 
Ha'Shoah. members created a 
temporary memorial in honor of 
the victims, said Andrea Blair, the 
organization's adviser 

"It's a day set aside to remem 
ber the victims of the holocaust 
and for reminding Americans 



what can happen," Blair said. 

Each flag in the display reprc 
sents 10,000 men, women and 
children who lost their lives 
under Hitler's Third Reich. 

Despite the liberation of con- 
centration camps 60 years ago, 
I ho reality and horror of the 
Holocaust is still very personal for 
some members of the Hillel Jew- 
ish Student Organization 

For Sarah Waxman, senior in 
animal science, the tragedy of 
persecution affected her family 
Her grandfather emigrated from 
Austria, begging his parents (o go 
with him to the United Slates 
They refused and when flu Nazi 
regime reached power, they were 
murdered at Auschwitz 

Par Waxman. those who per 
ished should always be remem- 
bered Through the exhibit, Wax- 




man is not only honoring those 
wh<i share her faith, but honoring 
all those who died. 

"It's wasn't just Jews," Wax- 
man said. "There were homosex- 
uals, gypsies and people they 
(Nazisj just didn't like This is my 
contribution to all the groups 
who were persecuted" 

According to Aaron Brown, 



F Uqi lift* *n «rH of 
waUiMy H(t of 
SeitonHillln 
rtflwmbranc* of 

Holocaust Memorial 
Day. Each flag 
repmtnu 10,000 
Holocaust victims. 

Undsey Bauman 

Bum 

senior in criminology, remember- 
ing the horror and the death of 
World War II is necessary to save 
people of all faiths from ever 
being subjected to such torment 

"It's very important to remem- 
ber (he past and what happened 
to these people," Brown said If 
we don't, we'll let it happen 
again" 



Best Buy considering store in Manhattan 




By Wendy Haun 

KMMSiTMlCOllfGlAN 

Best Buy, an electronic ind 
appliance store is considering 
Manhattan for a new store In 
cation. 

Lyle Butler. Manhattan ATM 
Chamber of Commerce prcsi 
dent, said nothing has been li 
nahzed mi the possible store 

"Best Buy is looking at Man- 
hattan, but they haven'l ton 
firmed with anyone officially 
that they are coming to Man 



Ikittan," he said. 

Butler said cashiers at the 
Tnpeka store have been pro- 
moting a shire in Manhattan. 

People have been told by 
employees at the Topeka store 
to look itu | More in Manhat- 
tan soon," he said. 

However, Best Buy s corpo- 
rate offices have not ap- 
proached anyone in the city 
with a proposal Best Buy 
could not be reached for com- 

I hey have not released any 




information to anyone official' 
ly at the city," Butler said 

He said if ihe company docs 
decide to build here, it will help 
boost the economy by keeping 
students shopping locally 

"We lose revenue from the 



community from students 
shopping in Kansas City and 
Topeka' he said "Having a 

store tn the community will 
keep people at homo, shopping 
in Manhattan" 

Butler said it will also draw 
customers from smaller com- 
munities around Manhattan 

"ll will bring people from 
surrounding communities to 
Manhattan to shop," he said. 
It will give people another op- 
portunity to choose to keep 
their dollars in Manhattan." 



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OPINION 






To the point is an 

editorial selected and 
debated by the editorial 
board and written after 
a majority opinion is 
formed. Tnis Is the Colle- 
gian's official opinion 

Abble Adams 
Michael Ashford 
Johanna Barnes 
Ryan C. Flynn 
MaRGIrard 
James Huria 
Krlrtl Huria 
Jess* Wanning 
Sarah Rice 
Joanna Rubick 
Laann Sulien 
Bill Wall 
Loni Woolery 



Page 4 

TO THE POINT 

'80s relived 

With the exception of a few non- 
traditional students, today's K- Staters 
were born and spent their early child- 
hood in the 1980s. Here are the 
Collegian editors' favorite things from 
the decade of decadence. 

Abbie Adams: Definitely hair-spray 
ratted bangs. Oh, yeah baby. 

Michael Ashford: 
It was the last time 
the Kansas City 
Royals were good. 

Johanna Barnes: 
Dance your cares 
aw ay /Worries for 
another day/Let the 
music play/ Down at 
Fraggle Rock! 

Ryan C. Flynn: I 
remember watching 
Knight Rider a ton. I 
always wanted a 
talking car. 1 settled 
for one with a tape deck. 

Matt Girard: My favorite part about 
the 80s was the classic World 
Wrestling Federation battles between 
Hulk Hogan and Andre the Giant. 

James Huria: In 1989, 1 was 6. He 
Man was cool. 

Krisli Huria: He Man and She-Ra 
were the best ever, I watch them 
periodically. 

Jesse Manning: The '80s were great 
because of our bumblingly lovable 
president and skyrocketing deficits. 
Luckily, history seems to have 
repeated itself. 

Sarah Rice: My first crush was on 
Zach, the Lego Maniac, and my 
Cabbage Patch dolls were the 
audience at my weddings when I 
married him. 

Joanna Rubick: I'm a sucker for 
'80s pop music. I hate pop music of 
today, and probably would have hated 
'80s pop if I listened to it then. 

Leann Sulien: I miss the cute little 
Popples that you could transform into 
a small fuzzy ball, I even had i 
Popples play tent and sleeping bag. 

Bill Wall: I have three letters for 
you: NES. From quests to save 
princesses to never ending games of 
Duck Hunt, the Nintendo 
Entertainment System was by far my 
favorite part of the '80s. 

Loni Woolery: I miss the classic 
films from the '80s. Breakfast Club. 
St. Elmo's Fire. Pretty in Pink. My 
childhood wouldn't have been 
complete without them. 



WRITE TO US 

The Collegian welcomes your letters to the editor They on be 

wbmmt4tyt-ri*lx<iirtttri&pubJsa,fdu,(*\nvtriot\lo 

Ke4te116.«e4«lriduo>)mfffullMme,yMrlnsdwol*wl 

nu4M.LfrtmslnttibtaMri^ 

letters tniy be edited for length and daftly. 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Wednesday, May 4, 2005 



1< 



KANSAS STATE 

COLLEGIAN 



tomaicMj 



amUManm oaswt 



fc'FWtt 



MUBHUHCBI 



CONTACT US 

*m (+ ipm diss** a*. BM55S 




Appreciating security 

Cultural encounters put locations in context; insults better than muggings 




Every now and then, we find 
ourselves privy to some spectacle 
or event that reassures us that we 
aren't, in fact, liv- 
ing in the worst 
of places 

It could be 
any kind of in- 
cident, such as 
a humanitar- 
ian trip to a DAVID LIANG 

third-world 

country or watching a disaster un- 
fold on the evening news. I have 
had two such spiritual awaken- 
ings 

The first happened a couple of 
years ago while visiting the impov- 
erished Himalayan kingdom of 
Nepal on a school trip. The sec- 
ond came a few months ago while 
chatting on MSN with an old 
friend at NYU 

"So apparently they're having 
this 'masturbation techniques' 
class going on in the dorms right 
now," he began. 

"Err ...what?" 1 mean, Ameri- 
cans are famous worldwide for 
being more liberal (in the bed- 
room, that is) but tjiis was on a 
whole new level. 

"Yeah. You heard me" 



"Nice try, Jason. You're still as 
funny as a migraine." 

"Dude, I kid you not. i can 
send you one of the fliers if you 
want," came the sobering reply 
"It's freaking nuts!" 

In his haste to tell me about his 
crazy dorm mates, )ason almost 
forgot to mention a far more sinis- 
ter incident that happened a cou- 
ple of days earlitr 

He was mugged at gunpoint 
two blocks away from his dorm 
Fortunately for him, he was only 
out that night for a quick trip to 
the convenience store so the un- 
lucky robber made off with a 
princely sum of $5 

In Kansas, I've had to deal with 
some confrontations of my own, 
albeit of a different nature. While 
walking along the sidewalk from 
the chemistry/biochemistry build- 
ing toward Hale Library one Sat- 
urday morning, an ancient Chevy 
truck that looked like it belonged 
in the Kansas Museum of History 
pulled up next to me. 

"Hey there, sexy foreigner! 
Going back to China soon?" the 
person sitting on the right taunted. 

There were three of them in the 
truck - all clearly intoxicated - so 



"Err... what?" 1 mean, 

Americans are 

famous worldwide 

for being more 

liberal (in the 

bedroom, that is) 

but this was on a 

whole new level." 



1 ignored them. Besides, any witty 
response on my part would have 
really dropped me in it 

"He can't speak a word of Eng 
lish!" the guy sitting in the middle 
bellowed And with that, the three 
stooges were off in their old rust- 
bucket, laughing hysterically like 
madmen 

1 swore to myself that if 1 ever 
met those ruffians again I'd give 
each of them a Judo chop and $5 
for their annual M etisa dues. 

That incident remains, to this 
day, my most serious run-in with 
the local populace. 

What is the point of mention- 
ing this alongside my friend's 
story? Well, I believe that each 



episode provides a neat micro- 
cosm of both the city and the 
countryside. 

Of course, I'm not suggesting 
that everyone who visits New 
York will be mugged, or that any- 
one who comes to Kansas will be 
insulted by drunken cowboys in 
trucks It goes much deeper than 
that. 

New York has the kind of vi- 
brant arts and entertainment 
scene that 1, as a young city per- 
son, miss terribly Make no mis- 
take - it can all be great fun But 
it's also kind of wild, and living 
there almost landed one of my 
buddies a bullet in the chest 

Thai's why I prefer the latter 
story In essence, it's annoying but 
tame, comparatively harmless and 
almost humorous (in a certain 
light). 

And this is how I've come to 
view Kansas. It's not exactly a 
Shangri-La but at least it provides 
me the one thing I value more 
than anything else: safety. 



David Liang Is a senior In blothemistry 
Pleas* send your comments la 
opinion tipub. tiu. etfu . 



a mm 

SiMJeJO PHwr) p i u fta ii ii 




llluttrationi by EM* Athalpoftl | QUKUN 



Caffeine addiction should not be considered disorder 




Caffeine Is the force that drives 
thii time of year Students acre* the 
nation consume more and more cof- 
fee, tea, pop end ener- 
gy drinks as finals 
week draws cloeer 
and closer, creating 
Jittering, hyper- 
active, stressed- 
out versions of 
their former JUU* STOWof-F 

selves. 

Now studies are showing that 
after finals are over, students may be 
in danger of more than simple anxi- 
ety attacks while waiting for grades . 
Instead of being figuratively driven 
crazy by stress, the caffeine students 
consume during this time and the 
rest of the year may result in a men- 
tal disease when those students si- 
tempt to stop. 

Yea, that's right If students suffer 
from morning headaches and have 
difficulty concentrating without a 
morning cup or a trad-afternoon 
pick-me-up, they suffer from caffeine 
withdrawal, now a bona fide medical 
condition 

Researchers at John Hopkins Uni- 
versity claim that caffeine withdrawal 
is no different than withdrawal from 
any other drug, and even abstaining 
from doses of caffeine less than 100 
milligrams a day - equal to one 
small cup of coffee - produced com- 
mon withdrawal symptoms like 
headache, fatigue, depression, irri- 
tability, nausea, vomiting and muscle 
pain. 

As a result of these findings, caf- 



feine withdrawal will likely be In- 
cluded In the next edition of the "Dl- 
S noetic and Statistical Manual of 
sntal Disorders" - the so-called 
Bible of mental disease. Additionally, 
dlsgnosis of caffeine withdrawal will 
also be in the updated version of the 
World Health Organization's Inter- 
national Statistical Classification of 
Diseases and Related Health Prob- 
lems. 

This is a bit drastic. The fact Is un- 
derstood that caffeine Is one of the 
most widely consumed drugs in the 
world, but withdrawal from caffeine 
being a mental disorder is over-exag- 
gerating the issue. 

According to the Oct 19, 2004, 
"Life Science Weekly." in the 66 
studies conducted over the last 170 
years on caffeine withdrawal, the 
symptoms of this mental disease 
began occurring between 12 and 24 
hours after the last consumption of 
caffeine. The symptoms peaked be- 
tween day one and day two and gen- 
erally only lasted for two to nine 
days 

So, for a day or two after not con- 
suming caffeine, anyone can now be 
classified as having a mental disor- 
der. 

Mental diseases and disorders are 
a serious issue and do not deserve to 
be belittled by classifying those who 
forget four quarters to buy a Moun- 
tain Dew on the way to class as hav- 
ing one 

The U.S. government appropriat- 
ed more than $13 billion last year to 
the National Institute of Mental 



Health and the fiscal year 2006 esti- 
mate is more than Si .4 billion, ac- 
cording the National Institute of 
Mental Health's Web site. 

Classifying caffeine withdrawal as 
a mental disorder directs ■ portion of 
those funds needed for legitimate 
mental disorders to research and 
treatment programs to an issue that 
is a problem, but not a situation that 
requires immediate attention and is 
not life-threatening 

Mental disorders like schizophre- 
nia and depression have effects on 
those suffering from the disease that 
are far worse than anyone who cant 
find a Red Bull in the fridge. 

Research on caffeine withdrawal 
is interesting and teaches us more 

about our in- — 

dividual ±__ 

0* 



problems, but a misuse of funds to 
label It a mental disorder Is unfortu- 
nate. Government funds should not 
be diverted bom research and treat- 
ments of such disease that have long- 
term effects that will not disappear 
within a two to nine day period, 

The inclusion of this "disease" in 
national and global guides to mental 
disorders will only hurt those who 
suffer their entire lives from legiti- 
mate di se as es and provide fewer re- 
sources to assist those who an legiti- 
mately in need of help 





CAMPUS FOURUM | 3954444 * fourum@spub.ksu.edu 



The itnuahmm h the Collegians anony 
mom (a** system. Ike fours* a edited to 



san* no! the opinion 
of nV(j>JJfgian (ware they nvdotsrity the 
editorial staff 

AC m I* a fjJrt and I low *H*ky and I play 
Thanjeem and Dragons,* and I play a tot of 
o*« video same and I hare a Hfc. So I toot 
offense at saying thai otrtt dwrt know how to 



youi arses 

Jad layejttfi; you rocs my world. 



Hey, Caapsajiael Net heard of Pameroyi 
^wo^anje)«ylbandhomhbnr«artan 
pertanNr^itaWo^.bettKl^ 
ro»xwcalidSom«t fatheads out of 



Hay, CsM s sj U a: there's this thin. ■ ik-d 
Sunset Revival that a lot nf your readers 
actually attended. Nobody cms about Kwtfier 
Qfhwmudih«lomCWwhcwmtH*fTyrrfi 
HKtoatconduftaioartlevimintstview. 

ToafltWtsadkmt^rtawQUbwofl 
dead week (hanks 

If lessaeypeafkpay for parking tickets, 
parking, passes and metered parking, how 
tomtl(Stitsw»ntsto<haiyi«mof»rT»My 
rwiparktogo^ra^LWtnwyhaw 



enough money r 

Sa fm a senior and my adviser said I have to 
declare a major to graduate Who knew? 



J wish ft 
were Sunday, because flvafs my fun day 

las trying ts staey electronics and one of 
nwstia»>parti*m^tameatterfwwrtha 

jfcv mc* RKmIdM ssIssIb 

VBj O taa w fHPfaaell. ftng 1 . 



The Hiw i sl e e t saala js a ssi s i i is they're 

ertrmskateboardlr^ofsmotjreiweed But it 
you play PlayStation, you can do both at ffie 
same time. 

lf«tokt*nMrtMHisja ( alMllshaduniw(^ 
afl Mil. Twice. So what? 

Manic MseaJe* rocks my world. 



Nsy,MS4M«*ttts*s about the fraternity 
K Kappa Phi. Oh, thafs because they're all 
douche bags and they have the ntosl boring 



I Hke bewttw dad tawat NsjwtSDp at 
night 'cause rt there's one thing I want to do, 
(ft look at the dock tower more 



•a *. * 

■MM 



Wednesday, May 4, 2005 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 5 



Wine may not help heart 



By Bhgrtte Buraodt 

KANSAS VWHOUEGIAN 

Early studies that showed 
drinking may decrease the 
chance of getting heart disease 
could be wrong 

Even though many studies 
published in scientific journals 
during the past few decades say 
that drinking alcohol, especially 
red wine, reduces a person's risk 
of heart attack, stroke or other 
heart disease, more recent studies 
indicate that this may not be true. 

According to the American 
Heart Association, research is 
being conducted to find out if 
there are any benefits to drinking 
* moderate amount (one or two 
servings) of alcohol each day. 

The most common compo- 



nents of alcohol that researchers 
examine as potential benefits in 
reducing heart disease risk are 
flavanuids, found in red wine and 
other antioxidants But these 
components can also be found in 
other sources, such as grapes. 

Links between red wine and 
good health might also be due to 
other lifestyle factors. 

According to research pub- 
lished in the Aug 1, 2002, edition 
of the American journal of Clini- 
cal Nutrition, people who drink 
wine generally have healthier 
diets 

Wine drinkers also typically 
exercise more and smoke less 
than non -drinkers 

"Whether alcohol is good or 
bad for you is hard to say," said 
Bill Arck, director of Alcohol and 



Other Drug Education Service at 
University Counseling Services. 

A glass or two of wine in the 
evening may help people to relax, 
he said 

This might be beneficial to 
people with heart disease or who 
have a certain type of personality 
and might not otherwise relax 
during the day But that does not 
mean that everyone should 
drink 

People who take certain med- 
ications, or who are alcoholic, 
pregnant or nursing, should not 
drink, Arck said. 

"There is no long-term detri- 
mental effect for most people," 
Arck said, "but [drinking a mod- 
crate amount of alcohol] each 
day is also not necessarily benefi- 
cial" 



Construction zone fines increase 



By Lacey Stow 

KAKSASSWHOUEUAN 

Drivers used to speeding 
their way down Fort Riley 
Boulevard and onto Scth Child 
Road may want to watch their 
driving a bit more carefully 

Construction is underway on 
Fort Riley Boulevard going west 
and on the bridges that go over 
Seth Child Road The speed 
limit in that section has been re- 
duced to 40 mph - 30 mph on 
Seth Child - and it has also 
been made a no-passing zone 

Not all drivers arc paying at 
te in ii hi to these changes, 
though Sgt, Steve Boydn of the 
Riley County Police Depart- 
ment said there were 243 traffic 
violations issued in that area 
during April. 



Of those violations, 193 were 
for speeding, 27 for passing in a 
no-passing zone, nine for seat 
belt violations, four for follow 
ing another car (no closely and 
10 others for miscellaneous of- 
fenses. 

Boyda said the numbers 
aren't a lot for that area. A traf 
fie count done by the Kansas 
Department of Transportation 
recently found that an average 
of 20,00(1 people drive that 
route daily 

Boyda said more citations 
might have been issued, but offi- 
cers patrolling the area aren't al- 
ways able to follow drivers 

Officers have to consider 
whether chasing a car might 
cause an accident before they 
pull someone over 

Drivers who follow die speed 



limit help officers, because they 
tend to slow down the speeders 
behind them 

Boyda also stressed that fines 
double in construction zones, 
which means ticket costs can 
add up quickly, One driver was 
pulled over for driving 78 mph 
in a 40 mph zone and passing 
in a no- passing /one The dri- 
ver's fines doubled and the 
court costs totaled $718 

Drivers will have to drive 
carefully in the area for awhile 
Kevin Schorzman, area cngi 
neer for KDOT, said the con 
m ruction will last until fall 2006 

Schorzman said both bridges 
going over Scth Child will be re 
placed, as well as the ramps 
The ramps will go from a loop 
pattern to a diamond pattern, 
where the ramps are separate. 



Catholic Student Center choir releases 14-song CD; 1,500 sold in 2 weeks 






By Amy Bolton 

KANSAiSWEC0U(r.lAN 

People who like the choir 
that sings during mass on Sun- 
days at St. Isidore's Catholic 
Student tenter can now listen 
In the songs in their own 
hoi m 

The choir released a com- 
pact disc with 14 songs on it, 
Father Keith Weber said. 

"So many people have re- 
quested a CD to listen to the 
choir outside of Sunday Mass," 
Weber said 

Tbe money raised will help 

fund the choir's trip lo Ger- 

— many and Austria in May 2006 

^. "The money that we get 



from the CD is hopefully going 
to offset the cost of the trip." 
Frank Schmeidler, St Isidore's 
director of worship choir di- 
rector, said 

The choir is asking for a $15 
donation for each CD All pro- 
ds will go directly to the 
choir trip because Ed Schram 
Dodge paid the cost of making 
the CD. 

The choir held two record- 
ing sessions al St, Isidore's It 
recorded at least three cuts of 
each song, so members could 
use (he best-sounding take. If 
one lake sounded better at one 
point in the song and another 
take sounded better at a differ- 
ent point, the two were edited 



together to create the best final 
track 

"In the editing process, you 
can use the best part of each of 
those takes," Schmeidler said. 

There are about 60 choir 
members who sings for the CD 
and 10 instrumentalists provid- 
ed accompaniment, he said. 

The choir held a kick-off 
concert April 16, and in the 
weeks since, Schmeidler said 
the group has sold about half 
of the 1,500 CDs made. 

Weber said thai if all the 
compact discs arc sold, il will 
raise $22,500 and would great- 
ly help in lowering the cost of 
the trip. 

"It would make a significant 



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reduction in how much each 
person has to pay," Weber said 

This isn't the first lime Ihe 
choir has made and sold CDs, 

Two years ago it recorded 
CDs to help pay for a trip to 
Italy in May 2003 Weber said 
sales were successful, with 
close to 1,300 sold. 

Schmeidler said Ihe trips the 



choir takes are a good opportu 
nity for people to get more in 
volved in the church, beyond 
attending mass and singing in 
the choir 

"Il gives (he choir members 
Ihe chance to get to know each 
other a little better,'' he said. 

Kari Kennedy, junior in ele- 
mentary education and mem- 



ber of the St. Isidore's choir, 
said that recording the CD was 
a good chance to bond with 
other choir members 

"I really enjoyed getting to- 
gether with my fellow choir 
members and being able to 
make a really great product 
that we can share with other 
people," Kennedy said 



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SPORTS 



Page 6 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Wednesday, May A, 2005 



TENNIS 



Cats place 2 on all Big 12 team 



Staff Report) 

KANSAS STA.JKOU (WAN 

The K-State women's ten- 
nis team put senior Maria 
Rosenberg and freshman 
Tamar Kvaratskhelia on the 
All -Big 12 Team this season 

The All- Big 12 selections 
come on the heels of record- 



setting seasons for both play 
ers, who played the No, 1 and 
No. 2 singles positions, re- 
spectively, throughout the 
season The two selections 
keep a streak alive for K 
State of placing at least one 
player on the All- Big 12 Team 
since the birth of the Big 12 
Conference in 1996 



Rosenberg completed her 
career at K-State by becom- 
ing the all-time singles win 
leader with a reeord of 79-54 
over four seasons, beating out 
Petra Sedlmajerova, who 
won 77 matches from 1999 
2002. Rosenberg's winning 

See TINNIS Page U 




Freihnvw T*m*r 
KwntskheU* waits 
to return i ball 
during her milch 
against Texas AMI. 
Kvaratskhelia 
flnkhed the leawn 
with t K-Stat* 
record of J 1 -7 to 
earn herself a ipot 
MttheAII Si9 12 



Chris 
M*n*wlncktl 

CM I MAN 




BASEBALL 



land Goedert stores a run aqamst the Uwversrty of Kansas April » at Tointort family Stadium. 



Wildcats on 
the rebound 

Team looking up in standings 




Joe ftoundy ilidn safety bad to first base under me lag of Andy Schotl during their game April 29 It Tomton family Stadium. 



By Nathan Ryarson 

KANSAS StAtlCOl I EOAtl 

Less than a week ago, K- Slate was a team that 
thought it was hitting its peak. 

But now the Wildcats sit at the bottom of the 
hill looking up, hoping to regain their stride once 
again 

K State (23-20, 7-14) heads into mid-week ac- 
tion today against the Washburn I c ha bods 

Following Sunday's 6-4 loss to the University of 
Kansas, senior Terry Blunt said that against Wash 
bum, the team will try get back to the style of play 
that had helped them succeed the last few weeks 

The Wildcats had won eight of nine games and 
had moved into eighth place in the conference 



standings before losing two of three games to 
Kansas over the weekend. 

"We feel that we'll bounce back," Blunt said 

Time, however, is not on K-State's side. The 
Wildcats are currently at the bottom of the Big 12 
standings with just two conference series remain 
lD| to help salvage some goals and make it to tin 
conference tournament. 

"We're certainly not out of any of our goals that 
had the last couple of weeks," Blunt said 
'We're still in reach of all of those, 1 think this will 
help us to be a little more focused " 

Coach Brad Hill had problems explaining the 
sudden change in the team's play. 

"It's hard to explain why that happens to you," 
Hill said "You're playing good, and every time you 



Photo* by tindtey Bauman | rotlffJAN 



If you go 

K-State vs. Washburn 

When: / tonight 

Where: Tomton Family Stadium 

Haw much: Free with student ID Call (800) 22 1 CATS or visit 

www.k-itetHporb.am lot more information. 

walk on the Geld, you feel good about yourself. And 
(Sunday), all of a sudden, guys felt like it was up to 
them As a coach, you don't know how to get them 
out of (hat 

"To me, we played pressed and played like we 

See BASEBALL Page U 



NHL needs to get it figured out before fans give up on league 




Hunk you. NHL i 
doner Gary Betiman and the 



This is the month when 
bodce* become* a sport you can 
actually ait and witch bom the 
fast period until the fourth over 



Instead, I on subjected to al- 
fnrmngon such 
Sports Net and 




Instead of watching the Col- 
orado Avalanche ultimately 
match up with their hated rival, 
the Detroit Red Wings, in the 
Stanley Cup Playoffs, there is 
celebrity bowling with some of 
the top athletes from sports that 
do not include bowien. 

Or, I am subjected to watch- 
ing Eli and Peyton Manning go 
one -on-one on the European 
football field as the older brother 
plays goalie in ESPN's new 
game show, "Battle of the Gnd 
iron StarsT a sianofl of the for- 
mer ABC hrt/'Batto of the Net 
work Stan," which had a 
six-year run from 1976 to 1982 

Thank you, NHL, for making 
me not have • choice but to care 
about the flnt month iA baseball 



i - a time when every 
team it overachieving and still 
has a legitimate chance to win 
its division, unless you reside in 
Kansas City, Mo., Tampa Bay, 
Fla,; Pittaturgh or Denver. 

Pans get false hopes in the 
first few months of the season, 
but as the season drag* along, 
the dog days i ' 



their ujdy head and trounce 
thote (an* still with a pulse, as 
their favorite team free- falls 

Sorry Royals and Cuba (ant, 
if you ttiU have a pulse after the 
horrendous start to both teams' 
sea s o ns , they are already pre- 
pared to play out the string of 
the schedule until September. 

Instead of making headline* 
on (he ice, the NHL wul be back 



: news in the United States 
once again, as the two sides will 
meet Thursday for the first lime 
tince April 19. 

Locked out since September, 
and with the season canceled 
Feb, 16, the two feuding sides 
will come together to try to ham- 
mer out a deal for the possibility 
of a season next year. 

The NHL better figure ft out 
toon, because it seems like only 
a handful of people besides me 
ever talk hockey, As much as 
they want It to be an American- 
ized pastime, it will always be a 
large part of our neighbors to the 
north and a game that has loo 
mt^ confusing rules that get in 
the way of the acton 

Betonan needs to get some- 



thing done soon, and the players 
have to realize that their con- 
tracts are almost as out of con- 
trol as those of baseball players. 

They will never be playing the 
most popular sport in the United 
States, and they are doing noth- 
ing but hurting their image with 
each passing day, while the 
Stanley Cup remains safely in it« 
silver case lor another year 

For now, the Stanley Cup will 
just have sit in the comer of the 
closet, lonely, waiting to be res- 
cued from a sport that has no 
idea how unpopular ft really is. 





Mitchell 




1-MINUTE 
DRILL 

Staff Reports 

CBB | Mitchell named Big 12 
Pitcher of the Week 

K- State junior pitcher Chase 
Mitchell was named the Big 12 
Conference 
Pitcher of the 
Week Tuesday for 
Ito performance 
during Friday's 
game against 
Kansas in which 
he threw a two 
hit, complete 
game shutout 
during the 
Wildcats' 7-0 
win over the Jayhawks. 

It is the first honor for Mitchell, as 
he joins senior Terry Blunt as the second 
Wildcat to be honored by the league 
the season for a player of the week 
honor. 

Additionally, Mitchell was named 
to the College Baseball foundation's 
National Honor Roll for his performance 
against Kansas. 



The Associated Press 

MSB { Ex-Missouri player 
charged with assault 

COLUMBIA. Mo — Former 

Missouri basketball player Jeffrey 

Ferguson has 

been charged 

withmisde 

meaner 

assault in 

connection 

with a 

weeteno 

confrontation on a 

parking lot, presumably involving a 

88 gun. 

Police said Ferguson, 2), was 
arrested about 2 a.m. Saturday after 
he reportedly brandished a weapon 
outside an apartment complex after 
residents complained thai someone 
had taken their parking spot. 

Ferguson, free on bond, is 
charged with two counts of third 
degree assault, each carrying a 
possible 15 -day jail term, assistant 
Boone County prosecutor Steven 
Berry said Tuesday 

MBB | West Virginia's 
Pittsnogle declares for draft 

MORGANTOWN, W.Va. - West 
Virginia center Kevin Pittsnogle 
declared for the 
NBA draft 
Tuesday but 
won't hire an 
agent. 

Pittsnogle, 
who helped the 
Mountaineers 
reach the NCAA 
regional final, 
has until June 
21 to withdraw 

from the draft and retain his final 
season of eligibility 

Pittsnogle aveiaged 119 points, 
37 rebounds and 19.3 minutes a 
game this season He Is the school's 
all-time leader in 3 -point percentage 
(.418) and fifth in career 3 pointers 
with 162. 



NBA | Brawl chair-thrower 
receives probation 

P0NT1AC, Mich, - A fan charged 
with throwing a chair during a fight 
among players and fans at an NBA game 
— one of the worst brawls m US. sports 
history — was sentenced Tuesday to 
two years o( probation and ordered to 
pay about 56,000 in restitution 

Bryant Jackson was the only one of 
the 13 players and tans charged with a 
tetany in the Nov 1 9 metee during the 
Indiana Pacers Detroit Pistons game. 

Jackson pleaded no conceit In 
March to one count of tetany assault arid 
one count of misdemeanor assault and 
battery. He was accused ot heaving a 
chair over his head, hitting several 
people, and of throwing a drink at the 
Pacers as they left the court. 




Pittsnogle 



NBA | Wizards suspend 
forward Brown for playoffs 

WASHINGTON — The Washington 
Wizards suspended forward Kwame 



ton 
Tuesday tar the 
remainder of the 
playoffs. 

The 
announcement 
came after 
Brown, coach 
Bd* Jordan and 
president of 




Brown 



Emta Gnmteid met tar about 10 
minutes before the team's practice. 

Brown wont travel wtth me team 
ot paffldpate m any potties for the 
iwnatader of the season The Wizards 
are tied with the Chicago Bufc 2-2 in 
titrtfaomiCofifeienGt first -round 
series Game S« Wednesday in Chtc*j>i 



t 



ARTS | ENTERTAINMENT | SEX j FOOD | YOUR LIFE 

THE EDGE 



Wednesday, May 4, 2005 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 7 



Decade of imagination 




Photo lllustratloni by Chris Hancwmrk*! | CUIEUAN 



Teen movies, 

conservatism 

dominate decade 



By Sarah Rka 

ICANSASSTMltCXIfGIAN 

It was the decade of Cabbage Patch 
Dolls, "The Cosby Show," Top Gun" and 
G.I. Joes The Challenger exploded, the 
country explored conservatism, the AIDS 
virus drew fear and the Kansas City Roy- 
als won the World Series. 

K-State students spent their early child- 
hood in the 1980s - not only a decade of 
creative toys but political exploration as 
well. 

POLITICS 

"The '80s, more than anything, were 
dominated by the figure of Reagan," said 
Sue Zschoche, head of the Department of 
History. "It's an interesting phenomenon 
Certainly it would repre- 
sent the ascendency 
of conservatism in 
America - it's the 
end of the liberal 
period that began 
with FDR" 
The 1980s 
started after a 
shaky 1970s 
decade as 
Americans 
lost trust 
in the 
presi- 




tkiny when President Nixon resigned W 
lowing the Watergate scandal, Utf KM of 
the Vietnam War and Americans were 
held hostage in Iran 

"There were a lot of things in the 1970s 
that had been particularly unpleasant cs 
penally for Americans who would like to 
believe the American society was better 
than anybody else," Zschoche said "In the 
1970s, it was hard to maintain tti.it 

As president, Reagan transformed the 
country's morale thai had been damaged 

"Reagan's incredibly optimistic person 
ality restored the sense ol American tri 
umphism," she said. "The notion is that 
America is the greatest nation on the dice 
of the earth fne debate is whether you 
think that's a good thing or a bad thing" 

Brian Jones, PhD student in history, 
said his raMMCD has shown the influence 
the Cold War had on 1980s culture 

"The Cold War was one of those histor- 
ical phenomenons that dominated every 
thing, even if it's not obvious,' Jonc 
"So much of the culture was centered 
around (he Cold War so moth we dun I 
even recognize It* 

Jones said movies like "Red Dawn" and 
"Spies Like Us" as well as the Star Wars 
movies show the influence the fight with 
Communism played in everyday thinking 

"If you pay attention to Star Wars - the 
genre is sci-fi hut it has to do with this large 
expansive empire that seems to be taking 
over everything," he said. 

Much about the decade's political at- 
mosphere shapes today's philosophies, but 
has an indirect effect on today's college 
student generation. 

"I think the Cold War world suil shapes 
the American view" he said "'We still see 
the world in very simple terms - good 
versus evil In the 1980s that was the Sovi 
ets against the Americans. In 2005, it's ter 



mrinn that s the bad guy. It's good versus 
evil" 

ENTERTAINMENT 

Tim Finley was bom in 1980 and can 
describe himself as a time capsule of the 
decade 

He remembers G.I. Joes, Transformers, 
My Little Pony, Strawberry Shortcake and 
Hi vjan- 

t'hris Vancil. PhD candidate in history, 
said Saturday mornings were always a big 
event Vancil was bom in 1973 

■ In the early '80s was Saturday morn- 
ing cartoons," he said. "You got up on Sat- 
urday mornings cause that's when you 
COttid WStdl cartoons. There was no Car- 
toon Network," 

"Any Gen X or later is a fan of 'Top 
Gun," he said "I was one of the lucky few 
that got to see 'Top Gun" in the theater 

Oilier favc irites were hurror movies 

"I have to give a plug for the cheesy, 
i;i )i> horror movies,'* he said. "It was all the 
same, you just had to guess how much 
mure blood there would be than the last 
ll h )Vle " 

Vancil was a fan of "'Sixteen Candles" 
and "Breakfast Club" All '80s teen movies 
had the same theme of boy meets girl with 
a similar moral lesson. 

It's what inside that counts - inner 
beauty matters the most, which necessari- 
ly isn't the theme of teen movies today," 
Vancil said. 

This theme is a reflection of the con- 
sumer driven society of the decade. 

"It was a tough lime coming from a 
family thai didn't make a lot of money," 
Vancil said "You wanted that $110 pair of 
Michael Jordan shoes and the $80 pair of 
Guess jeans but you couldn't have them 
The movies tell you that you don't need 
that stuff Hi ere is something special about 



being different." 

As children in the 1980s, toys and tele- 
vision instilled a sense of imagination 

"Being a kid in the '80s was so much 
more imaginative than it is now. Toys did- 
n't play for us, we played with toys," Finley 
said The creativity that came out of being 
u kid in the '80s was tenfold what kids get 
today You could give us a pile of dirt and 
an open field, and we'd have fun for 
months" 

Those lessons of creativity have shaped 
the person he is today, Finley said. 

"Social skills and adaptation skills - 
these are all applicable, marketable things 
thai you can use now. The ability lo lake 
from life the appreciation of things that 
aren't spoon-fed to you," he said. 
"The ability to appreciate the 
finer things that aren't so elab- 
orate and because you have 
the creativity ." 

Growing up in the '80s, 
Vancil said, was much 
less complicated than 
the world his three 
children are growing 
up in today 

"To a certain ex- 
tent, some sim 
plicity has been 
lost Look at 
video games - 
was a kid when Pong and 
Atari came out," he said. "Those 
were fun and exciting but kind of simple 
games 1 think life for kids now is just 
much more complex We had to start deal 
ing with issues of drugs and AIDS growing 
up in the 1980s as a teenager. Those things 
were on the edge. Now. they are the norm 
Now you have lo have regular drug educa- 
tion for kids in grade schools I think we've 
lost something there." 




Fifth year lays out plan to stop kidnappings 

ASKTHE 

5, 

^/YEAR 




ADAM AKIN 

Q- Do you think the terrorist attacks 
ami kidnappings In Iraq will ever 
•top? 

A: I don't know if the bombings will 
ever stop, but 1 do have a plan to help 
stop the kidnappings. This will be a sui- 
cide mission so I won't enact this plan 
until I develop an inoperable brain 
tumor bom sleeping next to power 
lines, I'm not joking here about having 
a brain tumor There is a giant bundle of 
power lines outside my apartment wall 
that is literally less than three feet away 
from my head when I sleep. I figure the 
magnetic radiation should either give 
me a brain tumor or super powers. I 



haven't noticed many super powers yet, 
but I can bend a spoon with my bare 
hands So there's that. Anyway, 1 will 
wait until I only have about a month 
left In live to put my plan into motion 

I will travel to Iraq posing as an 
American journalist. 1 will wander the 
streets of Iraq unguarded, just waiting 
to be kidnapped. The one thing that the 
kidnappers won't know is that under 
my camera vest will be one of those sui- 
cide bomber's vests lined with explo- 
sives. Once I've been taken captive, I 
will wait until I'm put in front of a cam- 
era to get my revenge Instead of read- 
ing the little script they give me, I'll in- 
stead say "Gene Tenace at the plate.,, 
and WHAM MY," right as I set it off. 
This should make some of these terror- 
ists think twice about taking hostages. 

Oh, and for doing this I'm apparently 
suppose to receive 70 virgins in heaven 
or something like that. I'm excited 
about this reward but I'm a little con 
fused about how the whole "70 virgins" 



thing works No one has been specific 
enough when describing this, but I'm 

imiing that these virgins are girls. 
And I'm also hoping that these virgins 
would be willing to have sex with me. 
Because if you think about it, the reli- 
gion that promises these 70 virgins to 
suicide bombers could be describing 
hell Imagine what it would feel tike to 
be forced to live out eternity with 70 
gorgeous virgins who refuse to have sex 
with you 

This brings up another part of this 
whole "70 virgins for martyrs" thing that 
I don't understand Do you get a renew- 
ing supply of virgins so that you always 
have 70 virgins on hand? Because I 
guarantee that these girls aren't going to 
be virgins for very long, And do I actu- 
ally want to have 70 virgins on hand at 
all times? Was the besi sex you've ever 
had wirh a virgin 7 I doubt it. 

Another thing I don't understand 
about what this certain religion promis- 
es is if I and all my martyr buddies are 



walking around in heaven together with 
our 70 virgins, how do I keep track of 
which virgins are mine? Do 1 make 
them wear matching shirts with my 
name on it? Or do I keep them penned 
up in some sort of corral? If anyone has 
any answers, I would love to hear them. 
I think I'm going to want to straighten 
this whole afterlife reward system thing 
out before 1 go through with my plan 

And to answer your question, yes, re- 
ligions are fun to make fun of 

Side note: I was worried that the come- 
back episode of Family Guy would be 
toned down since it was basically can- 
celed because of the show's racy materi- 
al. But the show came back bigger and 
better than ever. Seth Mac Far lane is the 
smartest man alive. Welcome back. 



IN THE 1980S 



This ii d list ol important events the 
occurred during tne 1980s. Exact dates 
are listed when known 

1980 

■ Summer Oh/mpics in Moscow, USSR 
The US boycotts. 

■ Post -It Notes are Introduced by 3 M 

■ John L«inon is assassinated by Mark 
David Chapman 

■ Mtxint Saint Helens erupts, killing 60 
people 

■ CNN ts launched as the first all-news 



Adas* Is a flftkrsaar stater hi tasteest. If «*• hast* 
i cm t-sul Mss at 



■ Richard Pryor gets badly burned 
trying to (teeoase cocaine 

1981 

■ Columbia is the first space shuttle 
launched 

■ The US. Department of Agriculture 
tries making ketchup a school lunch 
vegetable 

■ The first IBM PCs are sold 

■ August 1 sees me birth of MTV, the 
24-hour -a-day musk television station 

■ Pac Man is introduced in the United 
Stales and sparks a huge craw 

1982 

■ Michael Jackson's Thriller sells 20 
million albums to become the largest 
selling record ever 

■ toy Osbou me bites the head off a 
live tut thrown at him at a January 20 
performance 

■ Liposuction is introduced. 

■ The Vietnam Memorial is erected in 
Washington, 0,C. 

■ The first artificial heart transplant 
takes place; the recipient lives 1 12 days. 

1983 

■ Cabbage Patch Kids dolls appeal in 
stores 

■lust Say No" is the new tool to 
combat growing drug use in the United 
States. 

■ Sally Ride becomes the first American 
woman in spate, June 18, on the 
Challenger 

■ Compact discs are first released 

■ French scientist Or luc Montagnter 
discovers HIV, the retrovirus that causes 
AIDS 

1984 

■ The Cosby Show" debuts 

■ Stonewashed jeans are introduced. 

■ The first megabit chip ts made at Bell 
Labs. 

■ The first all -rap radio format is intra 
duced at Los Angeles' KDAY 

■ Run D.M.C. are the first rap group to 
have an album certified gold 

■ Apple Computer releases the 
Macintosh personal computer 

1985 

■ LIVE AID in London and Philadelphia 
is beamed around the world. 

■ Crack cocaine starts to appear 

■ New Coke is introduced In Apnl and 
quickly replaced with Coca-Cola Classic 

■ The hole in the «one layer, first 
detected in 1977, is now indisputable 

■ In October, the world's largest atom 
smasher goes online in Illinois. 

■ The Nintendo home entertainment 
system is introduced 

■ An extra second Is added to the 
calendar year 

■ The Rock 'n' Roll Hall of fame is 
opened. 

■ Rod Hudson, the first major public 
figure to die of AIDS, dies on October 2. 

1986 

■ On January 28. the Challenger 
explodes 

■ The worst nuclear disaster ever occurs 
in Chernobyl, USSR, in Apnl 

■ Miami Hurricanes' qua rterbackVmny 
lestaverde wins the Heisman Trophy. 

■ America celebrates Martin Luther 
King Day for the first time 

1987 

■"Baby lessica," Jessica Mctlure, tails 
down a well and is later rescued. 

■ Condom commercials begin to appear 
on TV for the first time 

■ The world population reaches S 
billion. 

■ "Les MiseraWes'wins eight Tony 
awards, induding Best Musical 

1988 

■ CDs outsell vinyl foi (he firsl time 
ever, 

■ Work begins on the Chunnel, which 
connects Dover, England, to Calais, 
Trance, and which later became the 
world's longest undersea tunnel 

■ Sonny Bono becomes mayor of Palm 
Spnngs. California. 

■ McDonald's appears In the USSR 

■ Long Island beaches dose due to 
medical waste coming, ashore July 6, 

1989 

■The Berlin Wall fads Nov. 9. 

■ Cold fusion is announced tn March 
and then denounced at the end of 
summer as dumsy science 

■ Arsenm Hall becomes first African 
Amencantohostanighrtyialkshow 
January 3. 

■ Students protest on Tiananmen 
Square m Beiimg, China; the army tnter- 
wnes, and thousands are tiled. 



* - 






'►?r.* rirrrm 



Page 8 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Wednesday, May 4, 2005 



Decisions, decisions 




Chiij Hanewlnckcl | i ill I tGAN 
Ann* Otnsddle. (twhirun in family studies human service, rwds "firth, Rmsoii, and the FUque" while sitting on t bench In the Boko Free 
Speech Zone Tu«d*y afternoon. 

Commission approves zoo facilities 



By Cynthia Hoffman 
KANSAS STATE COUfGIAN 

The parks and recreation ad- 
visory board presented proposal 
requests for a zoo education fa- 
cility and an indoor recreation 
facility site analysis at the city 
commission meeting Tuesday 
night. 

The advisory board devel- 
oped a task force to complete a 
community recreation needs as- 
sessment back in February 2004 
Using the assessment, the advi- 
sory board created the propos- 
als, but no action has ever been 
taken. 

City Commissioner Mark 
Hatesohl said he was worried 
about the large amount of time 
the project was already taking, 
and he didn't like the future time 
deadline set by the board. 

"I'm a tittle concerned with 
the time element of this project," 
Hatesohl said "I know these 
things take time, but I hate 
telling people that it may be an- 
other 10 months before any def- 
inite decisions arc made." 

Bruce McMillan, park 
recreation advisory board mem 



her, said one of the pressing con- 
cerns was choosing a location 
fur the indoor recreation facility. 

Griffith and City Parks were 
the two final locations included 
in the current proposal Ed 
Klimek, city mayor, said he 
would like Cico Park to be an- 
other considered location, and 
Hatesohl said the county shop 
location could also be a possible 
site 

McMillan said four to five 
other sites were looked at, but it 
would take additional dollars to 
have all of the locations undergo 
a site analysis. 

Bruce Snead, city commis- 
sioner, said he thought alterna- 
iivc locations should be consid- 
ered despite the cost 
requirements. 

"I believe planning and site 
development dollars are worth 
spending when we are talking 
about a $20 million project," he 
said. 

Analyzing additional sites 
may take more dollars as well as 
more time. Tom Phillips, city 
commissioner, said that until a 
location is chosen, no develop- 



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merit can occur. 

"Before this project can move 
forward we need to determine 
an operating cost and wc can 
only do that once a site is cho- 
sen," he said. 

After encouraging the adviso- 
ry board to consider their input, 
the commission approved the 
proposal requests with a 5-0 
vote 

The commission also ap- 
proved the first reading of an or- 
dinance implementing a quarter- 
cent sales tax in accordance 
with the April 5 election results. 

"1 was very proud of the com- 
munity, because the results 
showed they place a strong im- 
portance on education," Snead 
said. 

The ordinance requires the 
approval of two readings. It will 
(hen be forwarded to the Kansas 
Department of Revenue and be 
effective Oct. 1 



Better safe than sorry 



By KHttcn Roderick 
KANSAS STATi COLtfGIAN 

Instead of pondering 
what to do at 10:30 on a Sat- 
urday night, Austin St. John 
waited by his phone for a 
call from one of his intoxi- 
cated friends. 

St. John, freshman in his- 
tory, was doing his part to 
keep the members of Delta 
Upsilon fraternity from dri- 
ving while intoxicated. 

"We have designated dri- 
vers so less people are out 
on the road after drinking," 
he said. "It's a way for them 
to get home safely." 

During his sixth night as a 
designated driver this semes- 
ter, St. John had about nine 
people in his '98 Mercury 
Sable at one time. The num- 
ber of people caused the 
car's engine to overheat at 
about 12:30 am 

Soon after the car cooled 



For more information 

About SafeRtde, 90 to 

httpJ/www.ksu.edu/osai/sakride.htm or 
call m 0480 

down, some of the D Us were 
still able to call St. John for a 
ride home. 

"Sometimes we fit 10-12 
people in the space for six," 
he said 

St. John said the number 
of people calling for a ride 
varies, but usually Friday 
nights yield 20-30 people. 

"We pick up guys from 
Delta Upsilon and some- 
times friends of people," he 
said "We're happy to pick 
them up." 

Tyler Young, sophomore 
in life sciences, said people 
in the house wait for desig- 
nated drivers. 

The drivers take them to 
their destinations and pick 
them up. 

Most fraternities on cam- 



pus have designated drivers 
as a way to keep the mem- 
bers from driving under the 
influence. 

"It's a great thing that fra- 
ternities encourage," Jeff 
Pitts, junior in print journal- 
ism, said 

It is not just fraternities 
(hat are pledging against 
drunken driving 

Any K State student who 
is intoxicated can call K 
State's SafeRide. The pro- 
gram is free of charge and 
open to all K-State studants 
from 1 1 p.m. to 3 a.m 
Thursday through Saturday 
nights. 

To use SafeRide, at least 
one student must have his or 
her K-State student ID. 

Students are required to 
ask for a ride to their resi- 
dence, not to another bar or 
party 

The last day for SafeRide 
this semester is May 14. ■ 



Online poker challenging for students 



By Joanna Rubtck 

KANSAS SWTKOtUQAN 

For no entry fee, students 
can play Texas Hold'em poker 
and win money in the College 
Poker Championship this 
month 

This is the second year for 
the tournament Lou Kreiger, 
author of seven poker books, is 
the volunteer host for the event. 

To register, go to www.col- 
UgepokeTchampionshipcom 
Registration ends at midnight 
There is a free download, and 
people have to be students and 
Royal Vegas Poker members to 



Kreiger said he wanted to 
help out with CPC. 

"It seemed to me be a terrif- 
ic way to give something buck 
to poker, since poker has given 
w much to me," he said 

Poker teaches life lessons, 



For more information 

To register o» become more informed 
visit www.cottegepoker 
ihampiomhip.tom 

Kreiger said. "Poker teaches 
you how to make decision in an 
atmosphere where there is 
missing information." 

Assessing risk, negotiating 
and bluffing are all useful skills 
that can be applied in life, espe- 
cially in the business world, 
Kreiger said 

"In poker, you arc often in a 
position to present your hand 
stronger or weaker than it real- 
ly is,'* he said "It's no different 
than it is in the business" 

All of the tournaments are 
online, and students' last 
chance to play in a qualifying 
tournament is 4 p.m. Sunday. 
Students who qualify will play 
in the semifinal tournament 
May 15, and the top 20 pert nit 



advance from there to play at 4 
p.m. on May 22 in the final 
loumaimnl 

The champion wilCT be 
awarded a $41,000 scholarship. 
and $1 ,000 will be donated- to a 
charity of contestant's choice 
for first through 10th places. 

Kreiger said poker is popu 
lar among students 

"There's always been a con- 
nection between colleges and 
poker," he said. "I wished there 
was something like the College 
Poker Championship years ago 
when I was in college." 

Playing poker online has ad 
vantages and disadvantages. 
Kreiger said. The disadvantage 
is players can't see their oppo 
nents, and the advantage is 
players can take notes on other 
opponents. 

"Poker is poker no nutter 
where you are playing it," he 
said 




Jkt o^^H 




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Talkal 




a 



Imagine a life totally devoted to Christ. A life where 
the reward* you seek are not of fthts earth. Imagine 
shunning materialism, rtutizing there's »« much more 
hi life when you follow in the footsteps of Jesus 

Wt- ate the sisters of St. Joseph. And it's true, our fives 
ate radi tally different from the world around us. For 
ours is a community of vowed women committed 
to prayer, sfimtual gnnvth, and servmg others. 

We invite you to deepen your relationship with fesus 
Christ and join us on our journey. 




radical .. 
way to live. 



You may not be entirely certain. And with the many 
distnn turns in today's world, it's easy to get sidetracked. 
But if you listen to your inner voice - if you listen 
to your heart you fust might find that devoting 
your life to God as a Sister is the radical way you 
art being called 10 live. 

Get this free CD-ROM from the StsU-rs of 
St. Joseph to help you find out if you've 
truly been called. To request your CD, 
call Sister Karen Sahbery, Vocation 
Minister, or visit us online. 

785539.7527 

wwwxajwkhiu.org 





? 









Wednesday, May 4, 2005 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 9 



Mental health center helps 
students with stress during finals 



By Joanna Rubkfc 

MNStfSWtCOlliaAN 

i May is mental health month, 
which seems appropriate with 
upcoming finals 

Studies show students suffer 
from depression and too much 
slress 

According to a 2004 Ameri- 
can College Health Association 
study, nearly 15 percent of stu- 
dents are diagnosed with depres- 
sion, and 32 percent of college 
students say stress impedes their 
academic performance 

The University of California, 
Los Angeles also conducted a 
study in 2004 It showed stress 
worsens with the grade level of 
college. 

Only six percent of freshmen 
said their emotional health was 
below average or below 10 per- 
cent, and that number jumps to 
14 percent for juniors, according 
tu the study. 

"It's a time of life when you're 
having a lot of fun, but you're 
also having a lot of stress," Linda 
Johnson, communication rela- 
tions coordinator at Pawnee 
Mental Health Services. 



(ohnson said Pawnee does 
see students for stress- related 
conditions. 

She said students should seek 
counseling if they think they 
have a problem 

"It's better to seek counseling 
than to suffer silendy," Johnson 
said. "If it's really interfering 
with getting things done, then 
you need to do something about 
it" 

Steeping a lot or not sleeping 
at all, change in eating habits 
and not being interested in activ- 
ities that were once interesting 
are some signs of depression, she 
said 

h* student think they have de- 
pression, they need to seek help, 
Johnson said 

"It's a chemical imbalance in 
the brain," she said "It's not nec- 
essarily going to get better all by 
itself." 

Megan Brent, post-doctoral 
fellow with K- State Counseling 
Services, said most of the ser- 
vices offered at Pawnee are of- 
fered at Counseling services. 

She said all students arc eligi- 
ble for services, as long as they 
are enrolled at K- State 




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LETS HELP OUR 

LOCAL CHARITIES. 



Please consider a 

contribution to 

support our local 

charities. 



THINK GLOBALLY. 

ACT LOCALLY. 



I 



Did you know? 
Where to get help 

Counseling Service* 

Where: English and Counseling Services 

Building 232 

Hours: 8 a.m. to S p.rn Monday through 

Friday 

Make an appointment: 532-6927 Of 

online at 

tittp://www.k-state.edu/tounfding 

Cost: some services an? free , others have 

minimal fees 

Pawnee Mental Health Services 

Where: 2001 Clafim Road 

Hours: S a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday and 

Wednesday 

8 a.m. to 9 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday 

8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday 

Make an appointment: 587-4300 

Cost: sliding fee scale based on income 

and ability to pay 



"Wc see students all year 
long I'd say it's been pretty busy 
the entire semester," Brent said 

Students can make appoint- 
ments online at wumk- 
state.edu/courtseling, but there 
are also on-call counselors for 
emergencies, she said 



Habitat for Humanity plans for summer 



By Christina Hansen 
KANSAS STAT! COLUMN 

On Tuesday night, the 
K State chapter of Habitat for 
Humanity celebrated the end of 
a successful year with an infor- 
mal barbecue at Wildcat Creek. 

While members played catch 
and grilled hamburgers, many 
talked about their experience 
volunteering with Habitat for 
Humanity 

Dusty Ewing, junior in archi- 
tectural engineering and presi- 
dent of the group's K-State 
chapter, has been involved with 
Habitat since a teacher encour- 
aged him to join in high school. 

"I got involved because I 
wanted to help people who were 
in need," Ewing said 

Kate Steib, freshman in ar- 
chitecture and the group's pub- 
licity chair, joined in the fall. 

"My brother actually worked 
on it in St. Louis, and said he re- 
ally enjoyed the experience, so i 
thought 1 might gel involved in 
it," she said. 

The academic semester may 
be drawing to an end, but the 
group is just beginning its latest 
building project in Manhattan. 
Members will begin construc- 
tion on a house on South Juli- 
ette Avenue later in May. 

Brandy Mann, freshman in 




Catrlna Rawton | full fOIAN 
Brandy Mann, freshman In secondary education, flips tourgm while Megan Imhoft e, »n*or 
in animal science, watches Tuesday evening at the Habitat for Humanity barbecue. The 
group was having an end -of the year barbecue celebration at Wildcat Creek. 



secondary education and recy- 
cling chair of the group, said 
that the latest house would be a 
big project for the summer 

"We will actually be building 
the houses and wnrking with the 
contractors," Mann said 

Mann said that Habitat for 
Humanity can always use more 
volunteers and donations. 

The group is currently con- 
ducting a book drive at K-State 
Ewing said that used books and 



textbooks that may have little 
resale value can instead be do- 
nated to benefit Habitat pro 
jects. 

Books can be dropped off at 
the Van Zile, Derby, and Kramer 
dining centers through May 13 

Students who arc interested 
in volunteering over the summer 
can call the organization's Man- 
hattan chapter at 537 7545, or e- 
mail Ewing at dre7755@k- 
state.edu 



Come join the fiesta! 
TAMALE DINNER 



4-7 p.m. Saturday, May 7 

Pottorf Hall, CICO Park 

Tamalcs, rice, beans and beverages 
Adults, $5; children 12 and under, $2.50 

Free hearing scr eenings from 4-7 p.m. 

The Scrtoma Luncheon Club raises money to give back to the 
community: providing software and lest materials for USD 383's 
Speech and Hearing Department, supporting the Si. Joseph Senior 
Community, developing a noise awareness 
program for area elementary schools 
and helping other groups 




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For more Information, call 1-800-622-2 KSU or 785-532-2565 todayl 
informationdceOksu.edu 

KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY 



EVENING 



www.dce.ksu.edu/eveningcollege 



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CLASSIFIEDS 



To place an advertisement call 



Page 10 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Wednesday, May 4, 2005 



II ■ ■ ■ ■ — 

11 . L L 1 s 



- ■ ■ 1 1 ■ ■ 

: L- DJ ±' 



1 1 1 1 
■ ■ 



1101 
For Rant- 
Apt 
Unfurnished 




LETS RENT 



For Rent- 
Apts Furnished 

STUDIO APARTMENTS 
On* block from campus 
Ample parking quiet corKS- 
lions Furnished or unfur- 
nished June and August 
$315 1785)539-3638. 



1101 
Fo» Rent- 
Apt. 
Unfurnished 

S50O Large two-bedroom. 
Dish washer. disposal, cen- 
tral air June 1 Pats Ok. 
'7713 

%t>75> month Early Bird 
discount otter! Four-bed- 
room two awl one-halt bath 
town home with washer/ 
dryer provided. Call 
(765)537 2111 

1026 BLUEMONT One 

and two-bedroom June t 
(785)317-7713 

1126 BLUEMONT- BtudH 
apartments with all bills 
paid Neutral colors with 
nice carpels Overlooking 
Aggieville with ofl-slrsel 
parking Save on parking 
permits and walk 1 j campus 
Available June 1 No pets 
(78S)313-Wa. 

121$ PONVTZ- One-bed- 
room basement opalmenl 
wilti neutral colors and lull 
sire windows Large waann 
ctosel All Mils pair 4 W?5 
Auguit No pets (/•85)313- 
tat 2 

1215 THURSTON One 
block to campus One-bed- 
room apartment Newly ren- 
oveled $390 All bills paid 
June lease No pels 
(785)530-0548. 

1219 KEARMEV Two-bed 
room June, year lease No 
pet* Water/ Irish paid 
Across street trom campus 

1844 ANDERSON, new 
construction, Ihrse-bed- 
room, two bath personal 
washer/ dryer, high-speed 
Internet aval labia June t 
(7851554-3456 or | 785)585- 
1310 

350 N 16th. A block to cam 
pus Five mnule walk to Un- 
ion or Aggieviwe Two-bed- 
room apartments. Big bed- 
rooms, central air, dish 
washer Washer/ dryer on 
site First month rent free 
August lease Call lor excti 
mg details (785)539-5506 
No cats or dogs 

511 BLUEMONT two-bed- 
room basement, new 

range, laundry, no pets 
June or August $430 plus 
utlMieS | 735)313-046? 

626 VATTIER- Two-bed- 
room spacious apartment, 
laundry facilities. Water/ 
trash paid One year lease. 
August 1 $430. 1 785)539- 
6704 

61 « THURSTON: Two-be* 
room June year lease No 
pels Water/ Irash paid. 
teOO |785)53*-Bl3a. 

615 R ATONE One-bed- 
room downstairs $425 617 
Kearney, one or two-bed 
room upstairs $425 620 
Colorado, basement em 
ciency. $275 No pets Au- 
gust (785)776 8548 

A ONE BEDHOOM June 
1. 1704 Fairview 1100 
Knamey 1 785)3)7-771 3 

A TWO-BEDROOM, nice 
large dishwasher, central 
air. One year or 6 month 
Matt*, (785)317-7713. 

BLOCK TO CAMPUS: Spe- 
cious iwo-bedroom. Ho 
peta Water and Irash tur- 
retried f7»5>t3»-«t6a. 

ONe-eeOHOOM sperl- 
■MM. IMS CMfUn $415/ 
month plus depostl No pets 
(785>*56-28T2 



CRESTWOOD APART- 
MENTS West side two- 
bedroom, one and one-halt 
baths Personal washer/ 
dryer fireplace, pool Water, 
trash, cable paid No pets 
$S70- $670 (765)776-3346, 
cr«ilwood-*B*flmentS com 

NEW 12-PLEX available 
June Two- bedroom luiury 
apart merits 1010 Bluemont, 
two ADA Iriendly $800- 
$825/ month (785)776-2t02 
or (786)556-2014 No pots 

NEW DUPLEX three bed 
room Central heat/ air. 
washer/ dryer hook-up, diah- 
wdStw, oil street parking. 
Rag lull b-nfis. wafer and 
Irash paid Don't itiisa (hit 
onel (765)341-2921 Of 
(788)776-3218 

ONE AND two-bedroom 

apart men Is many close to 
campus with washer/ dryer 
NO pets. Call (785)341 1950 
or (785)341 3365 

ONE. TWO three lour-bed- 
room apartments and nous- 
es June and August 

tseses No pels Call 
(785)539-19/5. (785)313- 
B296 

ONE- AND two-bedroom. 
Walk to campus covered 
perking, June 1 and Aug 1 
teases, very nice 1 (785)341- 



TWO BEDROOM/ ONE 
bathroom. Nice old home 
near park and campus, wa- 
ter/ trash paid, pels. Aug 
1 (913)219-4482 

WALK TO CAMPUS Spa 
clous two- bed room apart- 
ments, lots ol windows qui 
el conditions, ample park- 
ing, lurnished or uniumish- 
ed, washer/ dryer in apart- 
ment, reasonable rent 
June and August No pets 
(785)539-3638 



ONE-BEDROOM AND Stu- 
dio apartments. One-bed- 
room. $260/ monlh Studio 
$260/ month All utilities ex- 
cept electric paid Lease 
and deposit required Avail- 
able June 1 (785)537-7794 

ONE-BEDROOM APART 
MFNT close to campus 
1030 Kearney July' Augusl 
lease available No pels, 
Irash paid Call Aaron 
(618)729-6942 

ONE-BEDROOM ■part 
ment. Qas/ water/ Irash 
paid Laundry tac*nes One 
year lease June 1 , $380.00 
(785)539-8704. 

ONE -BEDROOM NEXT to 
campus. Trash and water 
included Available June 1 
<;■ Au-jusl 1 (785)31 3-7473 

ONE-BEDROOM WITH 
neutral colors lor August 
Across trom City Park with 
oil-street parking Local 
landlords who care and 
maintain the property Wa- 
fer/ trash paid. No pets 
(785)313-4812 

ONE BEDROOM, AVAIL* 

BLE Auguit Close to cam 
pus Water' trash paid Cen 
trgl air (785)537-7810 

one-bedroom two 

blocks to campus and Ag- 
gteville Washer/ dryer 
Pets ok (765)317-7713 

PRELEASING JUNE and 
August. Some units brand 
new. close to KSU. washer/ 
dryer Included. Call lor de- 
toJtl (785)776-2102 Ol 
(783)556-2014 No pete 

THREE BEDROOM ADJA 
CENT to campus. AN major 
appliances, off-street park 
ing, water and trash paid 
(785)564- 1 197 

THREE-BEDROOM CLOSE 

to campus Central air, 
dishwasher, laundry facili- 
ties No pets (785)539- 
9MB 

TWO AND three-bed 
rooms Close to campus 
Spacious dishwasher, cen- 
tral an, laundry tacefttes. No 
pets (786)63 1 88 6 

TWO-BEDAOOM APART- 
MENTS. Avasabte June. Ju- 
ly, end August 1114 Ber- 

trantt ($580). 1200 Fremont 
($600- $640). 701 N 9th 
($500- $5501 2014 Seaton 
($530). 523 Moro ($530), 
363 N 14th ($620- 600) 
www.ranl-apm.com, 
(7BS)S»B-4357 

TWO BEDROOM ONE 

balh does lo campus 
1826 Anderson Water and 
trash paid (788)341 -4498 



For Rent- 
Houses 

$1000 FOUR-BEDROOM. 2 
bath duplex Only lour 
years old. Good si/ed bed- 
rooms June Emerald Prop- 
erty Management (785)556- 
SsW 

$1200: FOUR-BEDROOM. 
TWO bathroom duplex 
three blocks from campus 
and Aggieville On 
ok), available August 1 Call 
Brian st (7651845-811? 

$435 TWO BEDROOM uu 
plex with central air and 
washer/ dryer. August 
Emerald Property Manage- 
ment (785)556-6899 

1733 KENMAR. A GREAT 
yard tor barbecues and 
fun. Spacious house fhnN 
lour -bedrooms All applian- 
ce*. Close to stadium 
Please tall 1785)539 -M77 

725 MORO Nice tour-bed- 
room, near campus, Aggie 
-iiie Large detached ga 
rage, washer/ dryer dish 
washer $1000/ month 
Available June 1. (913)710 
4730 

A CLOSE Six or live-bed- 
room two bath, central air 
Dishwasher, washer, dryer. 
pel* okay June 1 
(785)317-7713 

CUTE THREE-BEDROOM 

two bath house tor rent 
One mile wesi of KSU $625 
plus utilities (765)31 7-64bJ 

FOR RENT: Threebed 
room, two bath new home 
Washer/ dryer Oarage 
Available June I Orssl Val- 

u*. (620)532- 1 1 ■', 

FOUR BEDROOM, TWO 

and one half bath at $975/ 
month (785)537-2111 or 
Centu ry2 1 km Bhtcom . 

FOURBEDIiOOM TWO 
bath duplex 1410 Houston, 
half mile from campus, laun- 
dry, single property landlord 
No smoking, no pels 
$1150/ month. August 1 
(785)776-9260 

FOUR-BEDROOM. TWO 

bath house Washer/ dryer, 
great location. Spacious in- 
terior Some pets okay Aug 
1 lease (913)963-" 

FOUR-BEDROOM. TWO 

bath large house Close to 
campus Washer, dryer 
dishwasher, air $250 each 
person (785)776-2100. 

LOOK! BRAND NEW 
HOUSE! Four -bedroom, two 
bath Washer/ dryer. refriger- 
ator, central air One-hall 
mile lo campus August 
lease $1400/ month Under 
construction 1 6 1 4 Pierre 
(785)304-0387, (785)776- 
9124 

MOVE IN Now. 1019 Hous- 
ton Three-bedroom wrth 
day room upstairs Kitchen 
appkanoss Near City Park, 
downtown, and Aggieville 
$645. (417)823-9480 

NEAR AGGIEVILLE lour 
bedroom house, central air 

■::iiM.jiii-:ii-iny. nF slu-fi [.wiv- 
ing. $1000 per month plus 
uMilws (7*3)8)7.8070 

THREE BEDROOM, ONE 
bath 730 



dtehwaaher, central air. One 
car garage with big back- 
yard. $825/ month. 
(785)207-0212 



NEW LISTING: Available 
soon, Three-bedroom, two 
balh Large living room, 
game room, computer room. 
Located ai 918 Bertrand. 
washer/ dryer, central sir. 
yard. Irani porch (785)539- 
3672 

NEW SPACIOUS four-bed- 
room duplex, Two bath iwo 
lull laundry, game room wilh 
wet bar 928 Osage $1200 
(785)539-1564 

NICE HOUSES for rent 
Three, four, five and eight 
bedrooms Close to cam- 
pus June, July and August 
leasee Call Cliff (620)242- 
7823 

ONE BEDROOM HOUSE 
close to campus 1QT0 N 
i 1 th street too pels, fresh 
paid, summer lease availa- 
ble Call Aaron (816)729- 
6942 

ML NT ATM COM NOW 
leasing houses, apart- 
ments, and duplexes Ayail- 
abfe now June, July , and 
Augusl www rer 1 1 apm com 
i/Hbj',:t<j-t35/ 

THREE. FOUR, tfvs-bed 
room houses Close to 
Oft- si reef parking 
Washer/ dryer June and 
Augusl leases (785)449- 
2181 

THREE-BEDROOM AVAIL 
ABLE June Dose lo cam- 
pus Fenced yard Pels on 
approval (785)537-7810 

THREE BEDROOM DU- 
PLEX. Available June 

Trash and mowing paid 
Cenlral air Washer/ dryer 
(7a6)537-7f 

THREE-BEDROOM 
HOUSE. 1516 Campus 
$900/ monlh Close lo Vol 
Med Teaching Hospital 
June tease (720)733-1659 
evenings after 7 00pm 

THREE-8EDHOOM 
HOUSE, 3500 Chippewa 
Circle Westalde. Large, 
corner lot. Available June 
or July Call (786)539-1975, 
1785)313-8296 

THREE-BEDROOM 
HOUSE June/ August avail- 
able $1200 elect' i - 
water/ bash paid Washer/ 
>7ryer shared with basement 
(785)341-6807 

THREE-BEDROOM HOUS 

ES and apsrtmenls June 
and August leases Close to 
campus No pels (765)539- 
1975 Or (785)313-8296 

THREE BEDROOM HOUS- 
ES and apartment* starting 
at $750- $1100 Close to 
campus June and August 
leases No pets (785)539- 
1975 or (785)31 3-8298 

TWO YEARS old Four 
bedroom, two and one-half 
bath ALL appliances inelud 
mg washer, dryer, micro- 
wave Great floor plan with 
large bedrooms No pets 
August SI 200 (785)856- 
■STS* 

TWO-BEDROOM, $550 
Three-bedroom. $750 

Close to campus Washer/ 
dryer, central air (785)776- 
7100 



TOWN 
HOMES 

WAIl ABLE 



Sublease 

1108 Kearney A Block lo 
campus Two-bedroom 

apartment, washer/ dryer 
$475 all bill* paid Two 
month lease June and July. 
Nopals (785)317-3021 

ALL BILLS paid, lour-bed 
room, two bath. pool, inter- 
net, washer/ dryer. As soon 
as possible Contact Devon 
(9:3)406-7236 

APARTMENT FOR sum- 
mer aubleaee. Nice two- 
bedroom apartment Qulel 
location $600. Call 

(785)776-9009 

BO* OR gin $250/ monlh. 
Fall 2005- Spring 2006 
1725 Anderson across the 
street from the Alumni Cen- 
ter Call Zack Clear 
(913)244*173 

FEMALE SUBLEASERS 
wanted June and July 
Four -bedroom house, clean 
and spacious 618 Kearney 
Available rind- May 

(785)341-6022 

FURNISHED. ACROSS the 
street Irom campus at T728 
Anderson Faur-betiroom 
female only, trash paid 
please cell (785)539-9636 

HOUSE THREE-BED- 
ROOMS available for sum- 
mer sublease Big house 
and bedrooms, good loca- 
tion (926 Laramie) Air-oon- 
tlitiomng, lurnished, great 
roommate Ren l negotia- 
ble 1(620)353-8528. 
(785)770-3457 

LARGE TWO-BEDROOM, 

two bath available June 1 - 
July 29 Apartment complex 
is Campus East located at 
Cl all m and McCain Lane 
Has pool, balcony, fireplace, 
dmhwasher, end microwave 
Pets allowed Close to 
campus and Aggiovtile Rent 
is $265/ roommate or $530/ 
monlh (785)341 9257 

ONE-BEDROOM SUB- 

LEASE and three-bedroom 
sublsass avaitabe lor June 
and July Emerald Property 
Management ( 785 1 556- 



029 Mc 



1013-1029 McCollum 
2 Bedrooms 




785^537 7701 



NOW LEASING lor Summer 
and Falll Specious one and 
two-bedrooms See display 
ad on this page. Westches- 
ter Park 

ONE. THREE AND four- 
bedrooms Mo smoking, no 
drtnklng. no pets (785)539- 
1554 

ONE. TWO, three and lour 
bedroom apartment* Close 
to campus and Aggieville 
Dishwasher, laundry, and 
parting (785)537-6017 

ONE, TWO. Ihree bed- 
rooms Available June and 
Augusl (785)537-7138 or 
(785)313-1266 

ONE-BEDHOOMS AND stu 
dlos Close to campus 
Available June and August 
www rent-apm com 
(785)639-4357. 



Flo tfnmatifl 
Wante 

FEMALE HOUSEMATE. No 
drinking/ smoking $275/ 
month One-lhlrd utlltlle*, 
wssher, dryer. August 
teeee. emlca313uksu.edu 
or (785)537.1 484. 

GUYS SHARE s house 

$300/ monlh and share utWI- 
Mm Close to City Park Aruv 
6 pm, call (785)456-9109 

MALE WANTED Ttiree- 
bedroom, washer/ dryer, 
central aw, July lease $300/ 
month, one third utilities 
(785)3e2-4B5a 



ROOM AVAILABLE in tour- 
bedroom apartment May 
July 31 Close to campus, 
large rooms Rent $215 (ne- 
gotiable j plus cheap uii lilies 
May rent paid (785)341 
3835. 

ROYAL TOWERS: One- 
bedroom, one bath $4307 
month June- July Avasabte 
mid May Dishwasher/ mi- 
crowave Call Jesse 
(3 1 6)5 1 8-8097 

SUBLEASE CHASE Man- 
hattan Apartments, three- 
bedroom, available June 1, 
lower level, $780 per month 
(785)532-9851 

SUBIFJASER NEEDED 
two-bedroom, one balh, two 

io Aggieville Rani $5807 
negotiable June/ July 
(785)539-4487 

SUMMER SUBLEASE one- 
bedroom in a iwo- bedroom 
University Commons, mid- 
May through Jury $390 piu* 
one-halt utilities (785)564- 
0126 

SUMMER SUBLEASE 

$250/ month at University 
Commons Fully lurnished 
with washer/ dryer We pey 
all sublease lees plus $507 
month renll Call Tim 
(620)755-1079 



OPEN HOUSE 

W11DCAT VILLAGE 

4 l.,tw bedrooms 

Lirgp walk in closeLs 

1630 sf on 2 levels 

Lavatory in each bedroom 

lYarea w/wel bar 

A ftitlne 

Luis (if iiiileliHir spare 

KUinlm »t«i| appliances 

Full sia- washer * ilryvr 

Storm safe ruom 

Cable TV Included 

11300 per month 

2 Hlocks North of Kimball 

on College Aw. 



OPEN WED & 
3-5 pm 



FBI 



or call for 

appointment 

776-2425 or 5654761) 



PARK PLACE APART 
ME NTS Hurrytl avaiabilily 
limited One- two- three- 
bedrooms (785)53»-2»St 



UNIVERSITY 
TERRACE APTS. 

fymmii 2&1 Btdroom Apts 

WaiherfDrya 

or WashertDtytt Hookups 

Spmima Grounds & Pool 

Htkb 
1530 College Ave. 

CALL 537-2096 
9 «.m , lo 6 p.m. 



DUPLEX: LARGE four-bed- 
room, two and one-half balh 
near campus and Aggwvttle 
(785)537-6017 

FIVE, SIX and seven-bed- 
room house (two- Ihree 
kitchens) Available June. 
July, and August Several 
locations www rent - 

apm.com (785)539^357 

FOUR AMD five-bedrooms 
Available June and August 
(785)537-7138 or (765)313- 
1256 

FOUR BEDFIOOM HOUSE 
Washer/ dryer Nice large 
rooms OH -st reel parking 
(785)537-1566 

FOUR BEDROOM HOUS 
ES and duplexes Several 
local! ons Available June. 
July, and August Pels a), 
lowed In most www rent- 
apm.com (765)539 4357 

FOUR-BEDROOM, TWO 
bath house 1715 Colorado 
Washer/ dryer and dish 
washer Available June. Ju- 
ly, or August $1200/ month 
(785)539-0991 

FOUH-HEDROOM, TWO 
bath. 91 8 Thurston, all appli- 
ances. air-condi1n"nnir) 
laundry Clean, no pels Off- 
si reel parking Augusl lease, 
$1000 plus utilities 
(785}323-O061 

FOUR-BEDROOM, TWO 
blocks Irom campus 1535 
Harry. $1000/ month Call 
(785)294-0362 or (785(336- 
0202 

FOUR-BEDROOM. TWO 
blocks west ol campus 
2030 College Heights $275/ 
bedroom Newly remodeled 
Washer/ dryer, central heat, 
air -conditioner June 1 
lease (785)944-3491 Pels 
rwsgotiable 

FOUR-BEDROOM CLOSE 
to campus/ City Park Wash 
er/ dryer and dishwasher 
Large house June lease 
(785)341-5070 

JUNE. JULY, Augusl Now 
teasing one. two. thtee. lour. 
ftva, set. seven, eight bed- 
room houses and duplexes 
WWW t e n t • MJrTLjiQJTL 
178515:39-435 7 

NEW LISTING: Avallabl* 
soon. Three-bedroom, two 
bath Large living room, 
game room, computer room 
Located at 916 Bertrand. 
washer/ dryer, central air, 
yard, front porch (7851539- 
367? 

THREE BEDROOM 
HOUSE on College View 
Close to west side of cam- 
pus Available June i $840/ 
RWflfll (785)257 3488 or 
(785 1479-0222 

THREE BEDROOM HOUS 
ES, apartments, and duplex 
es Several locations Avail- 
able June, Jury, and August 
Pets allowed in most 
www renl-apm com 
(785)539-4357 

THREE-BEDROOM. ONE 
balh house with dan. 
Range, refrigerator, washer/ 
dryer included. Really dose 
to campus. Must sse. 
(765)463 5014 

THREE-BEDROOM. TWO 
bath home Clean, newly re- 
modeled, new appliances 
Ofl-strest parking and ga 
rage $900 rent Flexible 
leas* starling dale 
(785)341-6615. 



VERY NICE 

by the malt Washer/ dryer 
and dishwasher Available 
lor summer Rant negotia- 
ble Call (788)770-2324. 



Three Bedrooms 
Near Campus 



1 636 Anderson $780 

516 N 14th Si J750 

1225Kolona $735 

5l°NMonhottan $750 

1019 Fremont $460 

SlvNMonhoftan $775 




/;/;/ 





Forfl«f*V 

Apto. Furnished 



POUND [ARMING on side Manhattan City Ordinance 
waft East of Museum of An 4814 assures every per- 
Tueedsy morning (785)448- son equal opportunity m 
442* housing without distinc- 

tion on account of raoa, 




Flying Club has five air 
plane* and towesl rales 
Csd (785)778-1744. 

www ksu araj/ksfc 

CONGRATULATIONS 
GRADUATES Ironi 
Property OsmparV Moving 
to the Kansas Cay arsa? 

See dxkptey ad on tres page 
The Woods of Cherry 

Creek 

YfXl. WfTHOUT a ton- 

■cMncd- To stew a mrsTr 
return my gnome* 
I sign You *ar* 
you are stok. I tank you are 



LOST FERRET 

(7651317-3495 



CM 



*.. 



attain or 

bone should be reported 

to the Director of 

Resources at City Hall. 

(788)887-2440 





WILDCAT 
PROPERTY 

MANAGEMENT 

537-1331 

IS07Poynti#l 
2 BD @ $525 

IS09Poyntz#l 
I LG BD @ $525 

wisher & dryer 
ALL BILLS RAID 
June or August 



STUDIO APARTMENTS. 
828 Humboldt, $340, 1521 
Laevsrrworth $360, air, June 
occupancy, oWt paid. 
(78S)53«-»401. 

THREE-BEDROOM 
APARTMENT Vary mee. 
$810 June 1- Aug 1 Near 
AntjMvtae (786)B37.g08l 

THREE-BEDROOM AT 815 
H 10th St $720. atao 030 
Oaags $736. utmtie* paid. 
June occupancy (785)539- 
8401 

TWOBEDROOM CLOSE 
to campus Privet* batoony 
Central air. New 
d teh w as her June 
(786)341-5070 




NEW FINANCE Flan availa- 
ble on 2002 and newer, two 
and three-oedtoom homes. 
Only $1000- $2000 down, 
easy credit approval, and it 
costs tesa man ranting Call 
Today (785)539-5841 or 
(866)509-5325 (Terms and 
Conditions Apply} 




BRAND NCWt Two and 

Ihree -bedroom menu lac 
luted home* lor rent 
Comas with aU appliances, 
including washer/ dryer 
Rent prices starting at $650 
a month CaK today' 
(785)530-5841 (T*rm* and 
'•PPty) 




5alt> 
Ha Hotim 



16X80' 2001 SchuKZ Sen- 
sation Three-bedroom two 
bath $29,500 or beet otter 
(786)565-0724 

TWO-BEDROOM ONE bath 
mobile home. Cat* and 
smell dog* allowed Lot rant 
$145/ month $9000 of beet 
offer (786)687-7805 




LLJA 



we 
kick 
ads 



$478. CLEM*, roomy two- HM ^^S C S*'^L^ 

Leavenworth 81, $080. aft. 



bath m rxne- pkt. No pm '^^^J^f ««•■»■ 
Or**yeer tease 3032 Wnv <*■ (7tS}5asV640i 

be* (7»)53t>8e4a 



AVAILABLE AUGUST 1 
to cawvju* One-bed- 
•parftnent I7HS»S*7 

otao 



AVAJLASIJl JUNE I rou. 

pastrac r ri dupw*. $00 Lara 
mm * tats/ teom, iwo 



r*»t« 




JUNE, JULY. Augusl Now 

testi n g one, two, three, tour- 
bedroom apartments and 
MUM* Mxeay r e 
(786)539-4367 





THRFE AND 

•vsttabt* August Ctoaa te 



ROOM FOR rant lor 
mar Females only Cheap 
rent Ctoaa to campus Can 
{765)7tMM796 



AVAILABLE FALL: Mala or 
lemrle non-smoker No 
pete Three- be droom. 

Washer/ dryer Cabte/ inter- 
net $3«y month 2038 Shir- 
ley Lane <«1])Se$-8233. 
Apr* 



campu* Water/ 
Central an, coin-Opatated 
laundry (788)937-7810. 
r7S»)S37*SM 



TWO-BfcDROOM APART- FJtO HOUSE 9ta-«edroorn* 
MENTS. 




Available June, July 
August www.ient-epm 
(788)53*4347 



FEMALE WANTED 
two-bedroom house. On* 
block io campus Avasabte 
May i $250, all untitle* 
paid Cat (785)537^947 

FEMALE WANTED Share 

two-oedroom apartment 

Ctoaa to campus $27tv 

Cheap 



MALE, 1320 Fremont. 
across irom park, easy walk 
to campus/ Aggtevtlle Two- 
bedroom, dtshwssher. oven, 
ail utilities paid, $315. 
(785)304-9800 

Nice three-bedroom home 
Fully furnished Pet Iriendly 
June 1 lease $225/ month 
plus one-third utilities. Cal 
Cami (785)31 7-3494 

RESPONSIBLE FEMALE 
roommates wanted lor luxu- 
ry lour -bedroom apartment 
across si reel Irom west 
campus No pets, no smok- 
ing, short lease okay 

(785)776-631B 

ROOMMATE NEEDED, 
June or Augusl. $245/ 
month, one -third utilities 
■bout $60, boat paid, across 
trom City Pat* Call Adam 
(620)655-1101 

ROOMMATE WANTED as 
soon as possible $250 plus 
one third ulilitas Close to 
campus Contacl Anessa 
(616)606-6094 

ROOMMATES NEEDED, 
pay one-fourth uli litres. Nice 
house, fenced-in backyard, 
quiet nieghborhood Call tor 
dote*. (316)461 7377 

ROOMMATES WANTED 
New three-bedroom, two 
bath house Augusl Lease 
Outside pets okay Call 
Bnan (785)567 6447 

THREE CHRISTIAN le 
males need roommale 
$300/ month utilities includ- 
ed Washer/ dryer/ cabte 
Call Kendra [785)632-7159 

WANTED ROOMMATES lo 
share three-bedroom apart- 
menl nexl to campus UlilN- 
«s pax) Cenlral aw Wash- 
er/ dryer $325 each. Augusl 
l or before (785)636-5446 
(785)565-3405 (785)562- 
6755 




FEMALE SUBLEASER 

needed lor June and July 
New three-bedroom two 
balh home Close to cam- 
pus and Aggieville Rent 
$300 (620)397-3825 

FEMALE WANTED lor sum- 
mer sublease Starting May 
15, ending m Augusl $180/ 
monlh plus ulitilies Ten mi- 
nute walking distance to 
campus Four -bedroom, two 
bathroom house Washer/ 
dryer Call (785)776-9746 

JUNE' JULY Chase Apart- 
ment One bedroom m tour- 
bedroom with three guys 
$250 par month plus etec- 
tncity {620)544-9627 or 
bOUBrimansjhjnJhglnjaJlc 

m 

ONE BEDROOM APART- 
MENT available for June 
sublease Close to campus 
Also available tor August. 
Lease price negobabte Call 
(785)341-0536 

ONE-BEDROOM SUB- 
LEASE, pels allowed, close 
to campus May rent paid, 
available May 16 (913)424- 
3777 

SUBLEASER NEEDED" 
Walk to school and Aggie 

vllte One-bedroom span 
msnl $275/ month June 
through Jury Available May 
23 Call Roy (?B5)34 1-8487. 

SUMMER SUBLEASE two- 
bedroom apartment Close 
to campus Call Chns for de- 

taiis (913|4BB0ttB 

SUMMER SUBLEASE 
Roomy studio apartment 
One halt block Irom cam- 
pus, art-street parking, laun- 
dry access, water and trash 
paid Call Dakota (785)227 
5421 

THREE ROOMS available 
hi five-bedroom house 
June/ Jury. Washer/ dryer, 
cheap untitles $250 each. 
1011 Thurston Call 
(7851562-7323 or (785)587- 
5787 

TWO ROOMS available in 
lour bedroom newer apart- 
ment. Washer/ dryer includ- 
ed Low utilities Close to 
campus and Aggieville 
Rani: $287 per month Call 
(620)285-5992 or (620)793- 
2200 

™fO^ifO«0C*l APART- 
MENT avasabte lor summer 
$520/ month Dose to Ag 
gtevtlte Available June. 
1005 Bluemont (785I537 
4426 

TWO-BEDROOM, ONE 

bath avasabte now through 
Jury 28 Pool and laundry fa- 
cilities. One block from cam- 
pus $535 pet monlh 
(785)2314191 





(316)6444218 



KITCHEN HELP wanted 
Full or pert-time Apply m 
person IDOMoro 

LOVE 2 party? Love 2 
(ktno*? Love attention? 
Send Me An Angel w |uat tor 
yowl Minimum $70/ hour 
Contact (573)200-0474 
www sendmeenangeinow .0 



Deadlines 

Oassifxsd ads must be 
pisoed by noon tlsi day 
beJore yoo want you ad 
to run. (JASifed dtaptay 
ads must be placed by 
4 p.m. two wrton* days 
prior to the dole you wart 
your ad to tun. 
call 532-6555 



ClassifiedRATES 

1DAV 

20 words or less 

$8.25 
each word over 20 ,,, 
20e per word 

2 DAYS 

20 words or lew ... 

S965 
each word over 20 - 
25e per word 

3 DAYS 

20 words or less 

$11.30 

each word over 20 

30c pet word 

4 DAYS 

20 words or less 

$I2JS0 

eacfi word over 20 

35c per word 

5 DAYS 

20 words or less 

$1360 

each word over 20 

40c per word 

( consecutive day rale ) 



TO PLACE AN At> 

Goto Kedzie 103 * 

(across Irom the , 

K State Student union) 

Office hours are 

Monday trough FridaV 

from 8 am m 5 p.m. 

The office is open 

except on holidays. 

HOW TO PAY 

AD classifieds must oe 

paid in advance ursese 

you have an account 

with Student 

njoetafjrjfie inc. 

Cash, check, " 

MasterCard or Visa arc 

accepted. There is a 

S10 service charge on 

al returned checks 

We reserve the nght to 

edH, reject or property 

classify any ad. 



FREE FOUND ADS 
As a service to you, we 
run found ads for Ihree 

days free of charge. 



CORRECTIONS" 

II you find an error iri 

your ad, please cal u£. 

We accept response 

b*ly only lot the first. 

wrong Insertion 

CANCELLATIONS- 

If you sell your item 
before yout ad has 

expired, we wH rettidrx 
you lot the retTttlnin|; 

days. You must eel at* 

before noon the dey*^ 

befomtheadistobf - 

putjBshed ** 



HEADLINES ~ 

For an extra charge^ 

wan put a heatf*rt«T - 

a&ove your ad to cater* 

the readers altttiuoC 



/././ 



bulT«Hir 



housing) 



foyTTW 



^M 
&M 



ftamate* 



Wednesday, May 4, 2005 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 1 1 



Family-owned auto shops 
offer more than just parts 



By Angle Hanson 

KAMSASSTHTfCQUECIAN 

Cars need to be fine- tuned 
every now and then, and here 
are three businesses where stu- 
dents can find competitive 
prices. 

Since it's difficult to jpve an 
exact price for many car servic- 
es due to varying makes and 
years of cars, the owners base 
all these numbers on generaiiza 
tions, they said These six serv- 
ices selected arc also based on 
the most common car problems 
associated with college stu- 
dents 

Bud's Auto Service is owned 
by Bud C onk wright and is lo- 
cated at 301 Colorado St 

1. Oil change -$25.99 

2. Alternator - $80 to $250 
(without labor included) 
Conkwright said, "Since it's an 
electronic part, the price really 
depends on the application " 

3. Brakes - $39 to $69 

4. Transmission service - $80 
to $125 

5. Water coolant, flush and fill 
- $40 to $60 

6. Starter - $59 to $250 (with- 



out labor included) Once again, 
Conkwright said this price de- 
pends on the part needed and 
the application involved 

Ekart Automotive Services, 
owned by Terry Ekart, is local 
edat411 S. Fifth St. 

Keltie Bohr, senior in mar- 
keting, said she considers Ekart 
very reliable 

"I've taken my car to Ekart a 
couple times, and they also do a 
very thorough job," Bohr said 
"They're also inexpensive, and 
they call my dad each lime to 
explain exactly what they did " 

1. Oil change - $24.95 

2. Alternator - $100 to $150 
(without labor included) 

3. Brakes - $90 to $120 

4. Transmission service - $100 

5. Water coolant, flush and fill 
-$45 

6. Starter- $100 to $150 

Finally, both Oppy's Amoco 
Service at 605 S. Third St. or 
Oppy's Weslside Amoco Ser 
vice at 3001 Anderson Ave. are 
owned by Pat Oppv 

1. Oil change - $22 .95 

2. Alternator - (without labor 
included) Depending on vehi- 



cle, Oppy said, $100 to $400. 

3. Brakes - $130 to $150 

4. Transmission service - $80 
to $90 

5. Water coolant, flush and fill 
- $49 95 (with gallon of anti- 
freeze included) 

6. Starter - [without labor in- 
cluded) Depending on vehicle, 
Oppy said, $100 to $400 

The one thing these three 
companies have in common is 
that they are smaller, family 
owned businesses Oppy said be 
believes that is the advantage 
they have over larger corpora- 
tions 

"When you go to a big deal 
ership, you're paying for the 
name of the dealership," he 
said. "They all work on com- 
mission - my guys don't work 
on commission." 

Furthermore, Oppy said, it is 
also important to treat cus- 
tomers by the golden rule - as 
one would want to be treated. 

"A smaller company, such as 
ours, will treat you well, like 
you're their sister or daughter," 
he said. "The best advertising is 
word of mouth, so if you treat 
someone well, they're going to 
tell people " 



Student advances to nationals 

Holland to compete in team roping in Wyoming 



By J*sska Holland 

KANSMSrATHOMGIAN 

This summer, Rub Holland, 
siiphomorc in animal science 
and member of K State's Rodeo 
Team, will attend the College 
National Finals Rodeo. 

Holland will travel to the na- 
tionals competition in Casper, 
Wyo., June 1 2- 1 8 to compete 
against more than 40 other stu- 
dents from across the country 

After competing in 10 re- 
gional college rodeos in the past 
spring and fall semesters, the top 
three students in each region 
were chosen to attend nationals. 

Team mping was the event 
that Holland excelled in and 
will be competing in 

Team r< iping. also known as 
heading and heeling, is a POdko 
event that features a steer and 
two mounted cowboys. 

It is a timed event that relies 
on the cooperation and skill of 
the cowboys and their steer. 

Simply put, the header ropes 



the head of the cattle and the 
heeler mpes the heels or legs 

During nationals, Holland 
will have the opportunity to 
rope up to four times. 

I'm definitely excited, be- 
cause I'm a sophomore and I 
didn't get to go last year," Hol- 
land said 

Holland's interest in rodeo 
events began when he was 
seven years old and living in 
Overland Park. Kan 

He has been participating in 
rodeo events ever since and 
lakes rodeo seriously. 

To prepare for the event, he 
said that he will continue to 
praetit u every day, as usual. 

"I'll be well -prepared, and 
hopefully I will perform well," 
Holland said 

K- State nxleo team members 
compete in the Central Plains 
region made up of Kansas, Ok- 
lahoma, and Nebraska 

The Central Mains region is 
notOriOUl f"r their lough mid- 
west em style, 



"We're in one of 

the toughest 
regions and so he 
shouldn't see any 
tougher competi- 
tion then we've 
already seen." 

Truth Thimeidi 

MNKMINCONSTOaiONWtNU 



Rodeo teammate and friend 
Travis Thimesch, senior in con- 
struction science, said that the 
past year's experience of com 
pcting has prepared Holland for 
nationals well. 

"I think he'll do really well. I 
don't sec any reason why he 
shouldn't," Thimesch said. 

"We're in one of the toughesi 
regions and so he shouldn't see 
any tougher competition than 
we've already seen." 



kstatecolleaian.com 



CLASSIFIEDS 



To place an advertisement call 



3101 



3101 



3101 



3101 



3101 



3 1 a 



3101 



3101 



4151 



Help Wanted 

The Collegian cannot veri- 
fy the financial potential of 
advertisements In lha Em- 
ploy mant/Ca rear clsssl fl- 
ea I Ion. Readera are ed- 
vlsed to approach any 
■uch amploymant oppor- 
tunity with reasonable 
caution. The Collegian 
urges our raadari to con- 
tact tha Battar Business 
Bureau. SOI SE Jefferson. 
Topeka. KS 66607- 1 190 
(780)2324454 

Manhattan City Ordinance 
4814 aaaure* every per 
•on equal opportunity In 
securing and holding em- 
ployment In any field of 
work or labor tor which 
he/ aha It properly quali- 
fied regardless of race, 
•ex. military alatua. disa- 
bility, religion, age, color, 
national origin or ances 
try. Violation* ahould be 
repo rte d to tha Director of 
Human t l— pu re es at City 
Mall, (7t»)&e7 2441 

FULt-TlME SUMMER help 
wanted Roof truss manu 
tactuflng plant. 6107 Murray 
HO , (786)778-5081 



Help Wanted 

'BARTENDING' saOO a day 
potential No experience 
necessary Training provid- 
ed Call 1-800-966-6520 exl 
144 

ATTN: ARCHITECTURE 
students . Los Angeioi- 
baeed design II rm in need 
of draftsman Looking tor 
third or fourth-year stu- 
dent tor part-time posi- 
tion. Make Los Angeles In- 
come with Kansas living 
cost. Must be proficient 
with AuloCad 2002 or later 
and be able to produce 
floor plans and del si led 
tactions. Call JNH De 
tlgnt (31 01714-9168, ask 
for Jared- 

CAMPUS MINISTRY Budd- 
ing Manager with apartment 
Looking tor mala to share 
two-badroom apartment and 
co-manage campus ministry 
buttng Paid unlitws, free 
parking directly scrota from 
campus Begin August 15 
Call David al (7851539 
4381 

SUMMER HAY help Long 
hours Good US (785)587 
5852 



Help Wanted 

CDL DRIVERS FOR SUM 
MER WORK Cuvan World 
Wide Moving is k> > 
college students wiih a 
Class A or B Commercial 
Driver's License lor full-ume 
summer work Need to slay 
m town for summer stay in 
shape, and save some 
Cash? Greal inlem&hip alter 
nahve and lako advantage 
ot your existing tease' rental 
agreement Job is to per- 
form packing, loading, and 
delivery of household goods 
to our military and commer 
cial customers along with 
driving COL vehicle lo a lo- 
cal (obsrte Apply as soon as 
possible at 615 S 11th SI. 
on Fori Riley Blvd Very 
competitive S9 00 to S1 1 00 
hourly/ incentive wages Job 
begin* immediately follow- 
ing Spring (main week 
through summer and option- 
al part-lime work m Fail ot 
2005 Equal Opportunity 
Employer 

SUMMER KITCHEN Help 
needed Please apply ai 
Kile's Bar and QM 
121h Street, in Aggtevifle 



Help Wanted 



the new Aggie Village apart 
mems Full-lime summer 
position wiih part-time 
hours available now and in 
the tall semester Must be 
willmg to work most weak- 
ends II interested, please 
apply at MeCullough Devel- 
opment Ire . 210 N 4th 
Street Suila C Manhattan 
KS 



FULL AND part-time posi- 
tions available for furniture 
. and Installation 
Heavy lifting required Appli- 
cant must have a clean 
Class C driver's license Ap- 
ply >n person al Furniture 
Warehouse. 2328 Shy-vue 
Lane, Manhattan Behind 
Briggs Auto Lane 



GET PAID lor your opin- 
ions' Earn J 15- SI 25 and 
more par survey! 

www moneylorsurveyt co 
m 



Conrntuiatjons Graduates 

Curtin PiweRy Company 

Cutis Property Company It a longtime 
supporter of Kansas State University 



Moving to the Kansas City area? 




erty 



The Wood* ot m Menheaan, IS 
Ckarry Creek 



Call 913-266-1 187 Today 

■ hi called fi 

Wildcat Connection. 



www.The 1l»otliofChwrTCifek.com 



NOW HIRING - TWO LOCATIONS 



ABOVE AVERAGE COMPENSATION 

• Discounted Meals 

• Flexible Schedule 

• Crew Incentive Programs 

• Medical Insurance 

• Retirement Plan 



•WORK lOIUY 



ai: 

421 N 3rd Street 

W06 Andaman Ave, 

l-OM)nni t-rec- Wort place 



APARTMENT ^- RESIDENCES 

Cundlewood Dr. 77(>-lll£ Modoli Opon Daily 



Now Leasing! 

Sp acious 1 & 2 Bedroom A pts. 

A few homes remain for 
Graduate Students and Upper Class Serious Students 



Amenities 



• Great Location 

• Two Swimming Pools 

• Qiuet Park-Like Setting 

• Enormous Closets 
■ On-Site Laundry 

• Private Fitness Center 

• Abundant Parking 
•Garages 

• Storm Center 



Customer Service 



Three-Time winner of 
the National Multi 
Family CEL Award for 
the #i Customer Service 
in America! 

• On-Site Management 

• Full-time Maintenance 

• 24 hr Emergency Staff 



VISIT TODAY FOR FALL AND SUMMER -LEASING 

www. WestchesterParkApts.com 

WestchesterPark a CurtinPropertvCo.com 



S 



Help Wanted 

GRADUATE ASSISTANT 
SHIP In Educaftonal Innova- 
tion and Evaluation. May 
August, must be enrolled In 
si* graduate level crodll 
hours See 

*yyrvi Kal 'or de- 

scription and application in- 
structions Email 
cjhumanOksu edv lor more 

inform 

GREAT OPPORTUNITY 
Seeking a kvs in nanny, rat 
erences • must, babysitting 
enpenence necessary 

(785)537-9699 

GREAT BUMMER worne 
A&beslos Abatement Work- 
ers needed 40 hours ot tree 
training is required Class 
starts May 31 runs through 
June 3, 8:00- 4 30pm 
$11 60 par hour Comae! 
Laborers' Lr> 

Moro, tor an application or 
cad (785)537 1567 

HARVEST HELP wanted 
We are currently looking lot 
temporary wheat harvest 
help in Wichita. KS Job in- 
cludes scale work, and grain 
receiving 18 00/ hour over- 
time ts required Contacl 
Debruce Grains Company. 
Wichita. KS (800)733-8752, 
ask tor Neil. Kern or Donnie 
Equal Opportunity Employ 
er 

HELP WANTED lot custom 
harvesting, combine opera- 
tors and iruck dnvers Guar- 
anteed pay Good summer 
wages Call (970)463-7490 



LUBE TECH; Automotive 
Maintenance Specialist 
Part-time positions available 
immediately Call (785)565- 
5260 with personal informs 
(ion 

MCCUILQUGH DEVELOP 
MFNT Inc is now accepting 
applications lor an assistant 
maintenance technician 
This will be a futMime posi- 
tion in the summer with part- 
lime hours available now 
Interested individuals please 
M oul an employment apt* 
cation al i?1Q N Fourth SI . 
Suite C. Manhattan, KS 

NOW HIRING three interns 
lor summer Open lo an ma- 
lore Gam career skins Ac- 
counting public relations, 
marketing, communication 
travel, average earns $700/ 
Call) 785)3 17-0455 



Help Wanted 

MOVIE EXTRAS/ MODELS 
Needed! Young laces need- 
ed lo lit! a variety ot jobs' 
Candidates needed lor 
crowd and background 
scenes lor local productions 
No experience required! All 
looks needed 1 Up 10 $22 
hourtyl Call 1800)280-0177 
now for more information 

NOW ACCEPTING ,<i pai 1 
(Kins if tart lime and week- 
end furniture sales Suc- 
cessful applicant will be 
tnendry and neat m appear- 
ance Possess good cus- 
tomer service and sales 
skills Competitive wages 
Apply in perkon at furniture 
warehouse 2326 Sky Vue 
Lane Manhattan Behind 

Hngg'-. kufel I kM 

NOW HIRING Vista Drive 
In, a locally owned and op- 
erated quick service' restau- 
rant 11 adding 10 our loam 
Individuals must have a pos- 
itive attitude and be able to 
multitask and work well with 
others m a last paced envi- 
ronment We have multiple 
part-time and a tew full time 
poaMona available, must be 
able to work uunng the day 
KSU students encouraged 
We otter meal discounts 
flexible hours and promote 
from within Apply m person 
al 191 1 Tuttte Creek Blvd 

PERMANENT PART-TIME 
secretary Excellent skills in 
typing and computer Ven- 
ous duties (7B5|539 2356 

REFLECTION PIIOTOGRA 
PHY is looking lot a sell-mo. 
tivated outgoing individual 
for a lull-lime sales person/ 
office assistant Musi be 
available Tuesday 
day Call (785)539-1550 

STEEL A Pipe Supply Com 
pany has an opening for a 
Systems Analyst Position is 
responsible loi business 
process design, testing 
training and support Quali 
. include B S. degree 
in business, computer sci- 
ence, or related field Must 
have general knowledge ot 
business processes Candi- 
dates should submit resume 
to Personnel Department, 
Systems Analyst, P O Boa 
1688. Manhattan KS 
66505 Equal Opportunity 
Employer 



Help Warned 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 
Inc. has a part-time position 
lor a Macintosh technician 
(vallabie immediately The 
lech -support team maintains 
about 50 Macintosh work- 
stations providing software 
support as well as perform- 
ing general hardware main- 
tenance Applicants should 
have some experience with 
Mac OSX server and be fa- 
miliar with design software 
such as Adobe Photoshop. 
Adobe inDesign and Quark 
Express Any experience 
with networking, program 
rnmg or wiih UNIX'bnux is 
also helpful Pay starts at 
$7 SO pet hour with the op- 
portunity to advance Only 
students currently enrolled 
in spnng 2005 for al least 
si> ham *> reWJ BUM 
University can be consid- 
ered You are strongly en- 
couraged to contact Michael 
Yops at 1785)53211 
stop by Kcd/ie 1 1 5 for mora 
information about (he posi- 
tion Applications may be 
picked up In Kedzt* 1 13 or 
115 or online al 
.asuedu/teciVap- 
.(ml Please in 
elude your current class 
schedule 

STUDENT TECHNOLOGY 
Aasi slant in Technology 
Service Center Assist with 
mstakulion end maintenance 
ot technology classroom 
equipment Pieter candidate 
with Audio Visual equipment 
and computer experience 
Hours are 1- 10pm Monday 
through Friday 20 hours per 
week during semesters, full- 
time during summer and 
breaks. $7 00 hour Contact 
Anfhony Phillips al 

(7851532-334 1 for further in- 
formation Submit applica- 
tion m room #121 East Sta 
etium 

SUMMER HELP wanted 
pad'imie or full-time posi- 
tion Must work Saturdays, 
apply ai Brills Garden 
Acres 1800 S Scenic Ask 
for Angie (785)539-1901 

SUMMER POSITION Look- 
ing for a responsible indtv<d 
iml lo watch our three chil- 
dren at our home beginning 
Monday- Fnday 
8 30- 530 Ages are 4, 8, 
10 References required 
Please call Kevin al (785) 
564-160/ 



NEED AN APARTMENT FOR 
FALL OF 2005 IN MANHATTAN? 

We offer Apartments and Townhouse* 
throughout Manhattan. For a preview of 
our properties, please visit our website at: 

www.mdi-manhattan.com 



St TWO 

1 iBEDROOMS ■ Bet. 

S360-$520 L$500-$700 " $750-5940 



JUNE. JULY & AUGUST 
LEASES AVAILABLE 




™« 776-380' 






■ 






Help Wanted 

SUMMER INTERNSHIP 
ALTERNATIVE-MOVER 

Covan World-Wide Moving 
is looking tor college stu- 
dents lor summer work Ex- 
cellent opportunity to stay in 
town lor summer, stay in 
snape. and save some cash 
or it you need an Internship 
alternative or summer em- 
ployment Helpers and 
packers lo perform packing 
and loading of household 
good to our military and 
commercial customers No 
CDL required Apply as 
soon as possible a I 61 S S 
11m Street on Fort Riley 
Blvd, Very competitive S7 50 
lo J9 0O hourly.' incentive 
wages Job begins immedi- 
ately loUowmg spring finals 
week through summer 
Equal Opportunity Employ 



Furniture to 

Buy/Sell 

THREE 'PERSON SOFA 
Good condition $50 or best 
otter Call 1785)341 5676 

TWIN MATTHE5S tor i...l« 
with matching bed frame 
and dresser Call (785)317- 
7222 

4351 



Computers 

COMPUTERS REPAIRED 
and data saved Viruses and 
spy web removed to en- 
hance speed and rekabtffty 
Fast and reliable service 
Call Lair Gauche. 1123 
Weattoop. (785)776-330? 




The Collegian cannot veri- 
fy the financial potential of 
advertisements In the Em- 
ployment/Career classifi- 
cation Readers are id- 
vised to approach any 
such business opportuni- 
ty wiih reasonable cau- 
tion. The Collegian urges 
our readers to contacl the 
Better Business Bureau, 
501 SE Jefferson, Topeka. 
KS 66807- MM. (785)23? 
0454. 

400 



5101 



Automobiles 






$500' POLICE IMPOUNDS' 
Hondas Chevies. Jeeps 
etc Cars/ Trucks/ SUV's 
from $500' Fry (tilings and 
information call (800)366- 
0134 evt 7536 



1997 DODGE Ram 1500. 
1 1 1 ,000 mites tow package, 
quad cab $6000 (316)644- 
5040 



■ 



4101 



open 
market 



5301 



Motorcycles 






Items lor Sale 

$10t POLICE SEIZED prop- 
Bftj TV* PCs. DVD Play- 
ers, and more from $101 For 
more information (800)366- 
0307 exl M670 



GOVERNMENT SURPLUS 
field gear, boots, camou 
flags otomlng. much morel 
Also Ca'hartl Workwear 
Open Monday Fnday 
9a m - 5.30p.m.. Saturday 
9a m 4pm St Mary's Sur- 
plus Sales, St Mary's. KS 
1 765)43 7-2734 



KEGOHATOR FOR 
$150. or bast offer 

Jeff (785)221-1641 



1988 YAMAHA Radian 600 
$1500 or best otter Runs 
great' (785)564-3980 

2003 HONDA 400 EX 
$3500 or best offer 
(785)456-3418 

NEW RETRO scooter. 49cc, 
lour- stroke, 140 mpg grey 
and black, free campus 
parking in bike racks. $800 
( 785)539-9782 




All Apartments within Walking 
Distance to Campus 



m 



ONE BEDROOMS 

1022-1026 Sunset 

P UM BP 

1212 Thurston 

U70-490 
1950 1960 Hunting 

ftWMM 

1837 College Height! 

fftl 

TWO BEDROOMS 

1825 1829 College Hts 

coo WO 

Aggieville Penthouse „ , ■ 

$670 3 i 4 BEDROOMS 

1841 College Heights 

1205- 1207 Porneroy 

ISOSHillcrest 

1847 Hunting 

1550-1000 




n i ""^"Mt^iti """ 






' 



= mmm 



Page 1 2 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Wednesday, May 4, 2005 




Dr«w Nom | (OUEGIM 
At the condusion of his speech, Brian Willumi, anchor of HBC 'Nlqhtlr Newt* tain questions from the audience Williams got his start in 

broadcasting while working in Pittsburg, Kan. 

LECTURE I NBC anchor address society 'noise' 



TENNIS I All-Big 12 honors 



Continued from Page 6 

percentage of 59 percent ranks 
sixth all time at K- St ate, and 
her 67 doubles wins rank sec- 
ond 

The All-Big 12 selection is 
the second in a row for Rosen- 
berg, who attained the honor in 
2004 for singles and doubles 

Kvaratskhelia had the best 
season statistically of any fresh 
man in the history of the tennis 
program, breaking six school 
records She set the freshman 
wins record at K-State with a 
record of 31-7 at the No. 2 sin- 



gles spot, and set the career and 
single-season winning percent- 
age record at 81 percent 

Kvaratskhelia also set the 
record for consecutive wins for 
a freshman with 13 in a row in 
the spring 

After finishing their season 
with a 4-0 loss at the hands of 
the University of Texas in the 
second round of the Big 12 
Tournament, Rosenberg and 
Kvaratskhelia s seasons may 
not be over Both have legiti- 
mate shots at being selected for 
the NCAA Tournament, along 
with junior (cssica Simosa 




Senior Maria 
Rosenberg 
winds up for a 
serve during 
her match 
against 
Nebraska. 
Rosenberg was 
named to the 
all Big 12 team 
f or her perror'- 
mance in 
singles during 
the season. 

Chris 
Hanawinckal 

COilt'ilAN 



BASEBALL I Cats take on Washburn at home 



Continued from Page 1 

"You can be your own jour- 
nalist," he said. "All you need is 
the Web, a laptop, a modem 
and an opinion - and you'll 
mad) a strong one" 

But, despite the focus on the 
individual, Williams said he 
has seen numerous accounts of 
good news, especially when he 
was with the troops in Iraq in 
the early days of the war. 

I've been over with young 



men and women to Iraq and 
they are so well trained, moti- 
vated, love their country, and 
they don't ask why," he said 
They're working so hard and 
it lifts me up to be around 
them" 

Williams began his televi- 
sion career at KOAM-TV sta- 
tion in Pittsburg, Kan 

While at NBC, Williams was 
the chief While House corre- 
spondent and the anchor and 
managing editor of an hour- 



long newscast on MSNBC be- 
lurv succeeding Tom Brokaw in 
the "Nightly News" anchor po- 
sition in December 2004 

His new job, Williams said, 
is a dream he had since he saw 
the blue glow coming out of the 
television screen each evening 
In the back of my mind, I 
always had this goal to work in 
television," he said. "You're 
looking at a college drop-out If 
I can do it, folks, so can every- 
one in the realm ul my voice." 



DUBOIS | Families, friends honor professor's life 



Continued from Page I 

"He provided extraordinary 
service," Jackie Spears, Senate 
president, said "I saw him as a 
faculty advocate who 1 could 
trust I knew that I could ap- 
proach him and get a solid ar 
l£ument that 1 could trust was 
ilmught through" 

Spears said Dubois brought 
humor to the Senate 

"We have lost a valued 
member." Spears said. "During 
the first meeting after he 
passed, 1 looked and thought. 



boy, I'll miss that silly grin " 

Shannon |ones, former stu- 
dent, had Dubois as a proles- 
Nr from 1995-2000 

"He always made you feel 
comfortable," she said 1 was 
very thankful to spend the time 
with him that 1 was able to" 

Dubois was not just a pro- 
fessor at K Slate, he was also a 
student When he was obtain- 
ing his master's degree at K- 
State, Gary Coates, professor 
in architecture, was his advis- 



"I appreciated that you 



could always depend on him." 
Coates said "He was absolute- 
ly trustworthy, focused, earnest 
and strong hearted ' 

Father Keith Weber, of St. 
Isidore Catholic Student Cen- 
ter, said Dubois knew how im- 
portant family and relation- 
ships are church 

Tie had a heart of gold," 
Weber said "He showed it 
over and over again when he 
talked about how blessed he 
was to have so many people in 
his life and how blessed he was 
to have faith in God " 



Continued from Page 6 

had to win, and we weren't the 
same team we had been for two 
weeks." 

Washburn (20-28) will come 
into Manhattan hoping to end a 
10-gome losing streak 



K-State is tied for third in the 
Big 12 in hitting, with a team 
batting average of 307 

The Wildcats hope to avoid a 
repeal of the game they played 
against NA1A opponent William 
[ewell - a 6- 1 loss on April 1 3 in 
Manhattan 



Blunt said he thinks the team 
will be ready to go. 

"After something like (Kansas 
series) happens, we're definitely 
going to be focused," he said 

The Wildcats will lake the 
field at 7 p.m at Tointon Family 
Stadium. 



I Q iKI My $faff Applications 









We are sending out the 2005-2006 Faculty/Staff Parking Permit 

applications via e-mail. You should receive an e-mail that will allow 

you to fill out your form and then print and return it to Parking 

Services. An actual signature is mandatory. 

If you do not receive this e-mail, please look at our web site, 

ksu.edu/parklng, and under forms, fill out the 2006-2006 Faculty/Staff 

Parking Permit application. After you sign the form, please return 

via campus mall to Parking Services. 

You may use your new permit as soon as you receive it. Please 
destroy your old permit after displaying your new one. 

Your permits will be sent to your campus address after July 1, 2005. If 

you have returned the application 2 weeks or more ahead of July 

31, 2005, you will receive your new permit before you present permit 

has expired, If you have any questions, please contact 

Parking Services at 532-7275, 









i 




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/^M( A N S A S STATE 

Collegian 



w 

Ri 
M 
on 



Sub Exp !>•»■ 
Kansas State H.sloocal Society 
Newspaper Section 
PO Box 3585 
Topeka KS 66601 



. . .»i^v\_ri J 



150th 



www.kstatcciillegian.cnm 



Thursday, May 5, 2005 



Doing the dirty work 




Photo* by Chrli Hantwinctccl | CDUtGUMt 

Taylor Nedrow, fimtof in utdoloay, *nd Trey Thoropwn, fmhman m rttmenury *Am»tm, put iwjy Wtovtn Tuetdiy night it K*pp* Kappa Gamma Thompson « i houwboy three rviqhts j week it the sorority. 



ihR H^ifl 1 ■ I wylVi 

NraTQIV, JUOMf Ml 

udology, sudu 

drshettf salad bar 

tMdtMawttatoa 

tVWIU W1IM1V ■HPVMI 

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■KHT: Rittirt 

Gi»wa hmtof m 

hontomwe, gen 

ttyroroamcups and 

putes from tht 

f torege dos*t of 

kappa Oh* 

WMMldly Ittff- 

noon. Giesen It the 

houwooy ll K jpui 
(Wti for lunch and 



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Houseboys serve meals, wash dishes at sororities 



By Alex Yocum 

KANSAS STAtKOt I ItMN 

Service on campus means 
more then helping ihc commu- 
nity, and for some men at 
K Slate, it means washing dish- 
aft. 

T. Beyond working behind 
counters at the dining centers or 
the K Stale Sludcnt Union, the 
jt.ih i if houseboy is also available 

i campus job The majority of 



sororities have five to seven 
houseboys who are responsible 
for normal dinner duties and 
chapter dining. 

"They set up lunch and din- 
ner," Lindsey Wilbur, junior in 
hotel and restaurant manage- 
ment and member of Alpha Xi 
Delta, said "They also help the 
cook by storing food and wash- 
ing the dishes During chapter 
dinners they become the servers 
along wilh the normal set-up 



duties" 

Beyond the normal duties, 
other parts of the job are em- 
phasized as well, Russell 
Giesen, junior in horticulture, 
said 

"They stress etiquette on the 
job," Giesen said "During chap- 
ter the girls learn dinning tech- 
niques, and we learn to serve I 
have also learned about food 

See HOUSfBOY Page" 




Utilities receive record $72 million in federal assistance 



THf ASSOCIATE WtLSS 

"WICHITA - The Federal Emer- 
gency Management Agency has paid 
QUI more than $72 million in assis 
■ to J electrical cooperatives hit 
tie costliest ice storm in Kansas 




r.The storm of Jan. 4-5 knocked out 



power to much of south-central 
Kansas, leading President Bush to 
issue a major disaster declaration for 
38 counties. 

According to statistics released 
Tuesday by FEMA and the Kansas 
Division of Emergency Management, 
the storm damaged nearly 20,000 
miles of power lines served by the 10 



cooperatives. 

The largest federal payout - more 
than $ 1 1 million - went to the Nin- 
nescah Rural Electrical Cooperative's 
system in central Kansas, said Walt 
Nelson, utility team leader for Kansas. 

Once a federal disaster declaration 
is issued, federal funds pay 75 percent 
of eligible repair and replacement ex- 



penses The state pays 10 percent, 
with the rest paid by local entities 

The local contribution can be cov- 
ered by volunteer cleanup work, said 
Gene Krase, administrator of the 
Kansas Division of Emergency Man- 
agement. 

See MUEF Page U 




Vnt HW.No 157 



Child center 
looks for 
funding 



By Leann Sulzen 

KANSAS iMtl (01 1 MAN 

\ 

A new building for the KSU Child Develop- 
ment Center may be possible in the future with 
help from student funds 

The center is a non-profit business that is 
not connected to K-State, said Debra Ring, di- 
rector of the KSU Child Development Center 
It first began as a parent cooperative where 
parents took turns caring for children and grew 
to what it is today 

The center receives funding from the Stu- 
dent Governing Association, which goes to- 
ward 25 percent of the fees for students who 
are in need. 

Expenses are paid for by fees that parents 
must pay to receive child care. 

Ring said she plans to talk to the SGA in the 
fall about a possible referendum to use student 
fees for a new building 

"[ would be very careful that it was a small 
amount and that students were informed what 
the need was," she said. 

Charles Reagan, associate to the president, 
said a new building would cost about $5 mil- 
lion 

The center is at capacity with 197 students 
and is located in the [ardine Apartment Com- 
plex in a building that was constructed in the 
'50s for student housing. 

Bathrooms and kitchens still located in the 
center of the classrooms lake up space and 
make it impossible for the teachers to see the 
entire room at once, Ring said. 

The center does not have one main en- 
trance to access the rest of the building, and 
several outside doors make the classrooms un- 
safe, Ring said 

Despite all of the problems, licensing regu- 
lations prevent the center's facilitators from 
doing much in the way of remodeling, Ring 
said. 

"We really can't do anything to change the 
building itself," she said "If we remodel, we 

S<* BUILDING Pagfl? 



Riley County 

shows great 

need for infant 

care options 



By Joanna Rubkfc 

KANSAS STATE COIL MAN 

There are not many options for infant care 
in Riley County 

Numbers from the Flint Hills Child Care 
Resource and Referral Agency show infant 
care is a great need for centers and family child 
care 

Centers have a building or location that is 
designated for child care only Family child 
care is when children are taken care of in a res- 
idential home 

Spots for 0- to 11 -month-old children are at 
capacity at child care centers. There are only 
two vacancies for 12- to 17-month -old children 
in centers. 

For family child care, there are 16 vacancies 
for 0- to 17 -month old children. 

Patty Peschel, early care in education spe 
cialist in Riley County for the agency, said the 
numbers change daily, but there's always a 
need for more infant care. These are numbers 
from Wednesday 

"We have more problems helping parents 
find care for infants," Peschel said 

The agency puts parents in contact with 
centers and family child care residents, she 
said 

Peschel said parents call now to get on wait 

See INFANT Pag* U 



Today 



* 



Friday 



High 72 
Low 54 



High 76 
Low 60 



NEWS HIGHLIGHTS 



Al Qaeda man arrested 

Pakistani commandos nabbed a 
senior al Qaeda leader, described by 
US officials as the group's No. J 
operattvc, after a shootout at one of 
hes barren hideouts. Jubilant 
Pakistani oftktah said Wednesday his 
anew would ttetp in the hunt for 
Osama bin Laden. 



AIDS drug testing 

Gowmment funded researchers 
tested W0S drugs on hundreds of 
foster children over the past two 
decades, often without providing 
them a bask protection afforded In 
federal law am) required by some 
states, an Associated Press review has 



Prosecution wraps up 

Prosecutors wrapped up their case 
Wednesday in the Michael Jackson 
trial after more than two months of 
testimony In which they sought to 
prow that the pop star molested a 
teenage cancer pattern and conspired 
to hold his family capfM at his fairy- 
tale estate. 



8 



DON'T FORGET 



The PhyHu Johnson Patrick 

lecture is at BO p m today 
in King * The took Is 
'NanoparDdeand 
Mioopartkle Aerosols 
Chemists Addressing Global 
Health.' 

Al IMS graduates (May, 



August and December) are 
invited to the Senior 
Send-off from 4 to 6 p.m. 
today at the Alumni 
Center North Terrace 

Practice Interviews are 
from 9 am to noon 

Friday m Hota Hall 



R 



/ 



~ 



Page 2 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Thursday, May 5, 2005 




Puzzles | Eugene Sheffer 



ACROSS 
1 Spring 

wind? 
5 Mite 

tractions 
9 Back 



12 

pooctl 
13 Profess 
UPratoe 

in 

vers* 
13 Fruit filled 
dessert 

17 Bom 

18 Teer- 
(srKer 
need 

19 Whodunit 
wrttaf"! 
■ward 

21 Di voice- 
court 
figure 

22 Hoslon 
role 

24 0a 

origami 
27 Urban 

carrier 

20 Persian 
VIP 

31 Plata's 
partner 

32 Popular 
card 
game 

33 Indivisible 

34 Pool 
member? 



M Retainer 

37 Cbaron'a 
rtver 

38 Poliilcal 
payment 

40 Alkalinity 
number 

41 A number 
of people? 

43 Started 

the 

computet 
47 Tibelan 

gueNe 
46 Radio 

type 

51 Blackbird 

52 Former 
science 
magazine 

S3 12/24 and 

12/31 
ft Aachen 

article 
55 Winning 

margin, 

maybe 



MRocke 
teller 
Center 
attraction 

DOWN 

1 Moolah 

2 Job safety 
org. 

3 Pour — 
(exagger- 
ate) 

4 Went 
frolicking 

5 Confront 

6 Space- 
walk, lor 
short 

7 "A 
mouaef 

S Kilmer 

poem 
9 Unlikely 

victor 

10 Notion 

11 Juror, for 
instance 



18 BO 

purchase* 
20 Moines 

lead- In 
22 "Boating" 



23 Reed 

Instrument 
24Navtga 
lion 

hindrance 
25 Raw rock 
25 Intellec- 
tual 
27 Sleeve 
end 

29 Whatever 
number 

30 Whammy 
35 Earlier 

then 
37 April 



Solution time: 25 mini. 




□an oooa 



□ana aac Qaaa 



□□»□ awn 




VMterdty'i answer 



RMM 

39 Bad 
lighting? 

40 Kitty 

41 Voundsr 

42 Color 
quality 

43 Soil 

44 ' Hi kKh 
THtki-— " 

45 Square 

46 Cubicle 
lumiahlng 

49 Med 
setup 

50 Switch 
positions 



DIVERSIONS 

A WASTE OF TIME — BUT HEY, IT'S BETTER THAN LECTURE 

What we accomplished 



Sarah Rice, editor in chief 
After four yean, f have probably 
managed to mate more enemies 
than friends all in the name of 
journalism I have listened to your 
angry calls, read your letters of 
praise and saw the newsroom way 
more than my apartment 





Michael A shford, sports editor 
I pissed off the entire state of 

Nebraska for the readers. 
Someone had to yoke the 
feelings every K- State fan has 
ofthathomd state. 



1 


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23 


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24 


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27 








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38 




39 






40 






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43 






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47 






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" 









Matthew Glrard, managing editor 

I was our editor in chiefs 
official shield. I tept all of her 
unwanted stalkers/wannabe 
boyfriends/angry readers at 
a safe distance and laid the 
smacketh down when needed 



Loni Wooiery, managing editor 

Throughout all my hard work and dedication 
to the Collegian. I am still puuled how I 
managed to lose more money than I 
actually made. Its hard work being the 
Collegian drinking coach 



Kristi Hurta, news editor 

I brought you the news about a former professor 

being convicted of 

murder, a Wichita man 

who pleaded innocent 

to killing 10 people and[ 

the latest on the adult 

entertainment 

Industry. 



Abbie Adams, Edge editor 

t informed readers about 
everything from popped 
collars to sex toys. 





Jesse Manning, opinion editor 

I was the Gerald lord of the 
editorial staff — an accidental 
leader who filled space tor a 
while. Oh yeah, and I brought you 
the Fourum. You're welcome 



4£^K 



See story on page I for details . 



5«S CRYPTOQUrP 

SDZS MQL IZGOFBFXONS 

ON Slf- XFFGMZSEIQO O 

GFM'S EMGQINSZMG LDZS 

DQ NQQN OM TQFTBQ. 
Yesterday's Cfyptoquip: WHEN THE PASTOR 
BECAME A BAD PERSON, WE STARTED TO CALL 
HIM A SINISTER MINISTER. 

Today's Cryptoquip Clue: F equals O 



CPYPTOOiMP BOOK 21 Sand 14.50 (i*w*An o } 10 ' 



CryptoQaiilei each i, P.O. 801 536475. Orient*. FL 32883-6478 



•notwr « you Kr* tut X aquae O, H ** equal O tvoughout t» 

punJ* BnQfm Mien, stwt won* end won* UMng an epoekoph* 

pv* you duet to tocakng vowed SoMtan ta by Mtl end «to 
« 2004 by Kjog FmIufm SyndeaM. Inc. 




Johanna Barnes, copy chief 

I let the occasional mistake slip 

through so you, the readers, would 

still have something to complain about. 



Leann Sutien, campus editor 
I siphoned gas from the Virgin 
Atlantic GlobalFlyer into my car 
before take-off so I could 
guarantee the flight would „ ' 
be dramatic W 



Ryan Flynn, presentation editor 

I would like to 
thank the readers 
for taking my life 
from me and 
having to stay in 
the newsroom for 
14 hours a day. 



James Hurta, writing coach 

I earned enough credits to graduate, 
so the readers no longer have to deal 
with entire Collegian staffs that have 
been Indoctrinated with my 
antiquated journalism "standards" 
and "ethic* 







Joanna Rubkfc, 
crty/gov editor 

1 sabotaged the Center for 
Student Activities referendum 
campaign by running only 
unbiased stones 



Qirts Htewwmdcel, 
Thanks to the 
Collegian editors' 
retreat and the 
game "never have! I 
ever," I wHI never 
look at the staff 
the same again 
Thanks, Collegian. 



«• editor 




Bill Wall, online editor 

I have completely eliminated 
the need to sleep in my daily 
routine Thanks to the 
Collegian, evolution, and 
caffeine for making this 
possible. 



Deredt Hooker, ad manager, and lynsey 
Bourne, assistant ad manager 

We made the paper 'tight' with lots of ads because 
we all know people only read the paper for the ads. 





DCUCX BOOKER laTHEY ECU RUT 



The blotter | Arrests in Riley County 

Reports are taken directly from Riley County Police 
Department's daily logs. The Collegian does not list wheel 
locks or minor traffic violations because of space constraints. 

Tuesday, May 3 

■ At 2:10 p.m , Mark Lawrence, 4440 Turtle Creek Blvd., No. 10}, - 
was arrested tor driving on a suspended license and habitual vlfJUE" ; 
(ions Bond was set at $4,S00. 

■ At 1:10 pm., Benjamin Ouinlon. 1020 Yuma St., was arrestftftor-^ 
probation violation. Bond was set at $1,000. 

■ At 4:45 p.m , Robert Veach, 2500 Farm Bureau Road, No. 222, 
was arrested for failure to appear and probation violation. Bond 
was set at $6,000. 

■ At 5:05 pro., Anthony Moss, 2908 Nelsons Landing, was 
arrested for driving on a suspended license Bond was set at $759. 

■ At 8:50 p.m., Dorothy Strauss, Herrington, Kan., was arrested foe' 
failure to appear Bond was set at $289. 

■ At 10:46 p.m., Bryan Crawford, St. Louis, Mo., was arrested for 
DUL Bond was set at $750. 

Wednesday, May 4 

■ At 1:30 a.m.. Douglas Stramman, 519 N Manhattan Ave., No. IV 
was arrested for disorderly conduct. Bond was set at $750. 

■At 1:47 a.m., Brennan Knort, 121 N 15th St, was arrested for 
reckless driving and DUI. Bond was set at $ 1,500. 

■ At 2.56 a.m., Clinton Holt, 928 Osage St., was arrested for DUI 
Bond was set at $750. 



The planner 

Campus bulletin board 

Campus Calendar is the Collegian's campus bulletin board 
service. Items in the calendar can be published up to three 
times. Items might not appear because of space constraints 
but are guaranteed to appear on the day of the activity. To 
place an item in the Campus Calendar, stop by Kedrte 116 and 
fill out a form or e-mail the news editor at 
bullelinvdipub.ksu.edu by 1 1 a.m. two days before it Is to run. 

■ The G raduate School aonou nces the fina I ora I defense of the 
doctoral dissertation of Olgafy Ramos at 9 a.m. today in Waters 
129 

■ The Graduate School announces the final oral defense of the 
doctoral dissertation of Brenda Torn at 9:30 a.m today in Fairchild ' 
102 

■ The Graduate School announces the final oral defense of the 
doctoral dissertation of Akiko Sugio at 2 p m. today in 
Throckmorton 4011 . 

■ The Graduate School announces the final oral defense of the 
doctoral dissertation of Matthew Grleshopat 2:10 p.m. today In 
Waters 129. ■_ : 

■ All 2005 graduates (May. August and December) are invited' - - 
to the Senior Send-off from 4 to 6 p m. today at the Alumni Cento 
North Terrace. Tiy 

■ The KSU Pre Dental Chib will have its final meeting, 
elections and annual barbecue at 6 p.m today in City Park. 



Corrections and clarifications 

Corrections and clarifications appear in this space. If you see 
something that should be corrected, call News Editor Kristi Huria 
at 532-6556 or e-mail colttqmrmpvb.ltMt.edu 



Kansas State Collegian 

(USPS 291 020] The Kansas Stale Collegian, a student newspaper- ' 
at Kansas State University, is published by Student Publications 
Inc., Kedzie 101, Manhattan, KS 66506. The Collegian is published 
weekdays during the school year and on Wednesdays during ihtv 
summer. Periodical postage is paid at Manhattan, KS 66502 
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Kansas State Collegian, 
circulation desk. Kedae 101, Manhattan. KS 66506-7167 

O Kansas Stat* Collegian, 260$ 




f. May 7, 2009 



riant 



Sale!! 



Poo 



TANall 

SUMMER 

FOR ONLY $Q(\ 



3 month unlimited on sale now! 





spirit 

Gifts For 

Mother's Day 
* Graduation 

M Free Local Delivery 




Parking 

Lot Construction 



Parking Lot construction 
north of trie Recreation Co 

This lot, ercompaalng c 

Oenison Ave on the east a 

the West, wHI require otfem 

over the course ol 



starting in May. 
hg between 
traffic circle on 
try and parking 






Please watch for more notices, check wtth the 

staff at Porting Services or the Recreation Center 

and follow signs and directions. 

We appreciate your patience during this period. 



__iSEND-0FF 

l( I \\. l-( |.l„. 

I - ll ||l Mfimilt I I I1IH in r tl f. i i 



.,tl, win) 

I » s\*I I I 



XX a» ( 



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Thursday, May 5, 2005 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 3 



Experimental waves 




Lindiey Btuman | (Oil EdAN 
ftyin firmer, wntof In dvtl Mtglnttring, ciMt« » mast in the wjvp tank we tfwt *s * project 
for Hydraulk tr gineerinq dj«. The project was used lo help student j vtsuallie the effects of 

wives at i ti '<■ '♦ wavelengths and frequencies. 



Royals provide affordable fun 



By E l — n Laux 

KANSAS SWt CMIEOAH 

A day al Kauffman Stadium is 
one of I hf cheapest at the ball- 
parks The Kansas City Royals 
has the second -cheapest ticket 
prices in the major leagues. 

Fans pay $13 71 for seats in 
the upper deck behind home 
plate. The Royals are much less 
expensive compared lo the 
Boston Red Sox, $44. 5b, or the 
Chicago Cubs, $32.00, accord inc. 
to the Team Marketing Report's 
fan cost index Tampa Ray is the 
unly team that beats the Royals, 
at $13.70 per ticket. 

Concession stand prices are 
alsii inexpensive. A 12 -ounce 



depenrinbtn quality service 

y/ final touches for 
your final projects 

^laflifl ^gooAi and CopUi 



beer is $3 50 or a 14 ounce soda 
is $2. Parking is $6 and a baseball 
cap is $12 

Curt Nelson, manager of mar- 
keting for the Kansas City Royals, 
said the company's philosophy is 
to make things family-friendly 

"The general focus of the com- 
pany is to make our product as af- 
fordable as we can," he said. 

The atmosphere works in the 
favor of the ballpark, since 
Kansas City is such a baseball ori- 
ented town. Nelson said 

"When generating a price, the 
philosophy is whether or not a 
family will be able to afford it," he 
said "We enjoy seeing people at 
the games, so come on out the 
ballpark." 



or* HOUR MASSage 

flV m */ K5U Studxnt tt> % jB 

™ 30VY flKST ^ 



mmtm Ttomtm M 

Cox Cookout 

for the CROSS 



May 7, ZOOS 

Tim* 

12 ■ 3pm 



Celebrity Dunk Tank 
Sponsored by 

Cox Bros. BBQ&. 

American Red Cross 



Location 

500 Sunset Ave. 



Cost 

$5 in advance 

$7 at the door 







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Endorsements help athletics run 

Nike, Alltel partner with K- State to provide equipment, supplies 



By MIchMl Ashford 

KANSAS MTl (CH I EUAN 

The signs are posted 
throughout KSU Stadium, 
B rami age Coliseum and Toin- 
ton Family Stadium, and the 
logos are stitched into the jer 
seys of Wildcat athletes, draw- 
ing the wandering eye of the 
fans to the companies who sup- 
port K-State athletics in a dif- 
ferent way. 

While it may seem as if 
K-State and the advertising 
businesses are endorsing each 
other, Bob Cavello, associate 
athletics director of business 
operations, said the term "en- 
dorsement" is not accurate. 

"It's not an endorsement, re- 
ally," Cavello said "We are not 
endorsing their products, and 
they are not endorsing our 
school. Its really more of a part 
nership" 

The K-State Athletics De- 
partment has numerous such 
partnerships with companies 
big and small, local and nation- 
al Major companies such as 
MetRx, Nike, Pepsi and Alltel 
all provide equipment and sup- 
plies to K-State athletes and 
coaches in exchange for signage 
at K-State facilities, in addition 
to other perks. 

Cavello said the athletic de- 
partment saves about $500,000 
on equipment and supplies 



each year through through their 
partnerships. 

"They get tickets, they get 
mentions, and more specifically 
with Met-Rx, we have a thing 
on our website called the 'Met- 
Rx Student Athlete of the 
Month," said Chad Kimmel, as- 
sistant marketing and promo- 
tions director for 
K-State. 

Nike is a big partner with 
K-Stale athletics since they pro- 
vide equipment and supplies to 
the Wildcat football and men's 
and women's basketball teams, 
three visible sports at K-State 

The original deal with Nike 
came about during the 1995-96 
football season, when the 
K-State athletic department 
began a search for a new equip 
ment sponsor. 

"With the Nike situation, we 
approached the "Big Three" at 
the time - Nike, Adidas and 
Reebok - and inquired if they 
had any interests in what we 
were looking for," Cavello said. 
"We shared with them our 
needs for equipment. Both Adi- 
das and Reebok said, 'No, 
thank you,' but Nike came back 
with interest." 

Five years ago, the Nike deal 
expanded to include the men's 
basketball team, and two years 
after that, the women's basket- 
ball team However, K-State's 
ci in tracts are not exclusively 



with Nike, as the athletic de- 
partment holds contracts with 
Adidas (volleyball and baseball) 
and Wilson (baseball) 

Because of the need for such 
a wide range of products, many 
times exclusivity is not granted 
to partners, K State's deal with 
Met-Rx, a nutritional supple- 
ment company based in Bo 
hernia, N.Y., is just one of sever- 
al nutritional suppliers for 
Wildcat sports teams 

"A lot of times, there's not a 
bid, because there's not exclu 
sivity," Kimmel said. "With Met- 
Rx, we also have relationships 
with other companies that pro 
vide similar products. We have 
a lot of mutual relationships 
like that In exchange for mar- 
keting, we receive product 

"Our coaches believe in 
their products, therefore, we 
negotiate with them" 

But products are not (he 
only benefit of the partnerships 
the athletics department holds 
Services provided to the univer 
sily help the coaches and ad 
ministralors communicate on 
the sidelines and in the office. 

One such service is provided 
by Alltel, the telecommunica- 
tions provider for K-State ath- 
letics. 

In August 2003, K-State and 
Alltel signed a three-year deal 
that, at the time, was the largest 
sponsorship agreement m 



K-State history In July 2004, 
the deal was extended by two 
years to run through 2008, 
adding an additional $2 million 
lo the deal, which brought the 
total value of the partnership to 
more than $5 million 

Alltel provides an annual 
cash payment, digital phones 
and airtimc lo the K-State ath- 
letics staff 

In return, the company is 
designated the official telecom- 
munications provider for 
K-State athletics and receives 
exclusive advertising and spon- 
sorship rights, in addition to 
signage, radio, television and 
print media. 

"What we are looking to get 
out of it is further exposure and 
enhancement," Chris Hunt, 
communications manager at 
Alltel, said. "The Kansas State 
Wildcats are very popular, and 
we at Alltel have a long tradi- 
tion of working with sports and 
branding - being connected to 
our brand " 

Cavello said, the partner- 
ships K-State has are more 
about saving money rather than 
making it. 

"We look al our endorse- 
ment deals not so much as rev- 
enue enhancements, but more 
like cost reduction," he said. 
"They provide equipment for 
our athletes that reduces our 
expense burden," 








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OPINION 



To tht point ttw 

edrtwitf selected and 
debated by ftwfdltortil 
board *nd written after i 
mtjor Ny opinion It 
formed, Thlj lithe Colie- 
gltn's officii! opinion. 

Abbl* Adam i 
Michael Ashtord 
Johanna lama* 
Ryan C. Flyn n 
Matt Glrard 
Jamai Hurl* 
Krlitl Hurla 
Jmm Manning 
Sarah Rica 
Joanna Ruble* 
Laann Sulxen 
Bill Wall 
LonlWoolary 



Page 4 

TO THE POINT 

Other funding 
options should 
he considered 

Facilitators of the KSU Child 
Development Center should took at 
other resources before asking students 
to help fund a new 
building. 

We understand the 
need for a new 
building to keep the 
children safe, hut 
please look 
elsewhere before you 
make a dent in our 
wallets. 

There are other 
options that can be 
considered, including 
private donations. 

Students would be 
more willing to help 
out with funding a new center if they 
knew that they were not doing it all 
alone. Hale Library is an excellent 
example of a project that was 
supported by both private donations 
and student funding. 

Furthermore, the center is not used 
by all students, so it is hard for 
students to understand why it would 
be necessary to raise fees for the 
project. 

We realize that the center is in need 
of either a complete face-lift or a 
completely new building to ensure the 
safety of the children who use it. 

However, it is necessary that other 
funding options be explored before 
asking students to foot the bill. 

If enough money in private 
donations can not be raised after 
extensively looking for funding, then 
the issue would be more welcomed by 
the students. 

Students should be the last resort 
when it comes to asking for funding. 



WRITE TO US 

The Collegian welcomes your letters to the editor. They can be 
submitted by e mail to lettenfrpubkHiedu, or In person to 
Kedfle 1 16. Please Include your full name, year In school and 
major, letters should be limited to 250 words. All submitted 
letters may be edited for length and clarity. 



KANSAS STATE 

.. COLLEGIAN 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Thursday, May 5 F 2005 





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Buried in feedback 

Columnist reflects on semester's angry letters, e-mails from readers 




GRANT REICHCRT 



It's been a good semester, no? 

Whether you were touched in a 
special way by the magic of Glob 
alflyer as it managed 
to never land in its 
flight around the 
world or touched by 
Michael Jackson at 
Neverland, it ^atfj 
was a feci- 
good/good- 
feel time for 
all 

On a personal level, I also ac- 
complished some milestones in my 
writing. I used the word vagina 1 1 
times, joked about having fat kids 
cannibalize abusive males, and de- 
rided a play despite having never 
seen it - and that was just one col- 
umn. 

Many were especially stoked by 
that last item. They believed 1 
shouldn't criticize something I had- 
n't directly experienced. On further 
contemplation, I think this is a 
good standard, not the least since 
adhering to it will literally kill off 
any opposition to the death penalty. 

Don't knock it unless youVe 
tried it, man. 

1 received other helpful feedback 
as well. Last semester, someone 



pointed out that Germany had not, 
in fact converted from the "12- 
month year to the euro" as I had 
asserted. I apologize for the error. 
In reality, they made the convention 
from a successful, valuable currency 
to the euro. 

Another perceptive individual 
informed me via e-epistie that He- 
moglobin is not, as I wrote, a super- 
villain that battled Spider-Man, but 
rather, "ft] he oxygen-carrying pig- 
ment and predominant protein in 
the red blood cells." 

That would 've made a much bet- 
ter punch line anyway; I regret the 
error. 

Looking back over my columns, 
I now see they were, as one person 
helpfully offered, "writ(ten) with the 
informative skills of a fourth grader 
just coming from his first pot party." 

For example, in a previous col- 
umn I stated that, if imbibed, chlo- 
ramines will change people into 
zombies This is incorrect. 1 apolo- 
gize for any stress incurred, or any 
Orson Welles, "War of the Worlds" - 
type hysteria that may have been 
induced among the more literal- 
minded segments of my readership 
If you successfully defended your 
house from zombie attack, you 



might want to call the post office 
and see if your mailman has report- 
ed to work lately. 

You can also stop drinking your 
own bodily fluids, as I quite over- 
staled the zombie prevention bene- 
fits of urophagja. Although not in- 
consistent with a successful, 
zombie-free lifestyle, studies have 
yet to confirm its positive benefits. 
Consult your local sanitation offi- 
cer. 

And, to the person who e-mailed 
to call me out as "a Democratic 
atheist" that shouldn't be repeating 
what my "twisted mind thinks up," 
your plea to, "[a]sk (myjself, do [I] 
have a conscience?" prompted 
some serious introspection: 

| 

Me: Self, do you have a con- 
science? 

Self: Dude, 1 told you, it was gone 
when 1 got here, I swear. 
Me: Yeah, and I suppose integrity 
was just "gone" as well? 
Self: Okay, I'll admit I sold integrity 
a long time ago. Talk about your all- 
time killjoys. "Downloading music 
is illegal," "Stealing toilet paper 
from Taco Bell is illegal," "Running 
over pedestrians is illegal . " I 
mean, that 



guy was always on. 

My diversity columns also elicit- 
ed some great response. One diver - 
sophile wrote, "Grant wouldn't 
have received such little and gentle 
feedback if he lived in a truly di- 
verse community." 

Which means, of course, that the 
more "diverse" the community, the 
less tolerant it is of those views that 
dissent from its multicultural ortho- 
doxy. I'll volunteer an affirmative 
"Duh!" to that. 

My favorite response came from 
an Instructor. He wrote, "I have 
been reading the Collegian for 38 
years and your "opinion" is the first 
since Vietnam that really scares me 
because of the basil of your opin- 
ion." 

My opinion: the scariest thing 
since 'Nam. It's been a good semes- 
ter Indeed 



Grant Htkhart H M a e rty m u M a a s ikw «f 
aasry, Mcsnaetitt lotton rtsovrajn, fsti 
column, PhM tand jpaur {MiMMnti ta 
itattaiPifiirBiit ajfc 




Illustration! by Amanda OinkM | (GlLEGIAN 



PGA Tour, graduate school prove to be similar experiences 




[ just finished reading Alan Ship- 
nuck's insider account of rookie 
Rich Beem's first year on the PGA 
Tour entitled Bud, 
Sweat, & Tees. Re- 
flecting on the book 
and my own time in 
graduate school 1 1 
alized there are 
striking simi- 
larities be- AARON DUMCAN 
tween the 
two. 

When I first came to K-State, 1 
had the unfortunate idea that gradu- 
ate school is a lot like prison. I had 
heard that graduate school is tough 
and involves lots of baekstabbing 
Therefore, your first day in, you 
should find the biggest dog in the 
yard and take that person out 

I WOtlld like to use this space to 
apologise to Jon Wefald for shoving 
him any first day on campus; 1 was 



I would also like to thank the 
member of the Riley County Police 
Deparvment who mishandled the 
evidence leading to my timely re- 



As It turns out, the PGA Tour Is a 
Ear more apt metaphor for graduate 
school. In nil book, Shipnuck de- 



tails Beem's struggles to make it on 
the tour. 

At this point you may doubt that 
any significant similarities exist be- 
tween a professional golfer and my- 
self. This is especially true if you 
were in my foursome during last 
week's faculty/staff tournament 

Consider this: during his first 
year on tour Beem earned almost 
exactly one million dollars - that's a 
one with six zeros behind it for the 
math-impaired. My first year in 
graduate school 1 also earned a 
salary that also started with a one 
and was followed by five zeros. 
Granted, two of those zeros sit on 
the wrong side of the decimal 
point, but that is not realty an im- 
portant difference. 

Let's just say that I was only one 
major accounting error sway from 
having to deal with Beem's dif- 
ficulty of being a young mil 
lionaire. 

Actually, there are 
some real similarities 
between Beam's 
venture onto the 
PGA Tour and my 
graduating from 
grad school and 
moving Into the big 



time academic world. 

Beem said you never get any re- 
spect in the culture of professional 
golf until you win your first tourna- 
ment. Likewise, until you are pub- 
lished in a major journal in your 
field you just cannot get into any of 
the good keggers during convention 
time. 

Writing a book getting a grant or 
publishing a new study is nice, but it 
only buys you a little time before the 
pressure to produce again mounts. 
Every PGA Tour vet dreams of win- 




ning a major championship that will 
allow them to pretty much play golf 
as long as they desire 

I dream wistfully of the day when 
1 will gain tenure and be able to 
stop having to wear pants to class 
and care about what students think. 

Some of my students' career 
paths resemble that of Beem's cad- 
die Steve Duplantis The story of 
Duplantis is interesting because he 
is one of the best caddies in golf, but 
has penchant for partying, marrying 
strippers and showing up late. 

. Duplantis ends up getting fired 
from a series of jobs because of his 
extracurricular activities Some of . 
my better students end up getting ; 
lousy grades because they refuse to 
let school work get in the way of — 
their partying 

Life at K-State can be a walk on 
the wild side, but in addition to 
twilling all the Bud you want, to get 
you also need some sweat 
id textbooks. 




— 



CAMPUS FOURUM | 395-4444 «- fourum@spub.ksu.edu 



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Thursday, May 5, 2005 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 5 



$12 million horse education 
r facility to be funded privately 



By Wendy Haun 

KANSAS SHTKOUEGIAN 

The College of Veterinary 
Medicine will soon be able to 
ofter better horse education. 

The Equicenler, a $12 million 
facility that will benefit the De- 
partment of Animal Science and 
offer training space for the 
women's equestrian team, is cur 
rently in the fund-raising stage 

The project, which was un- 
veiled April 25, is accepting pri- 
vate donations, said Mike Smith, 
vice-president for development 
with the KSU Foundation. 

"Both buildings are going to 
b"b built and equipped with pri- 
vate money," Smith said "We will 
raise the money as quickly as 
possible" 

'•' The timeline for the buildings 
is uncertain, but Smith said the 
Foundation is in the process of 
determining potential donators 

Tim Chapman, senior director 
of development for the College of 
Veterinary Medicine, said it will 
help draw people lu K-State. 

"It will include performances 
and educational aspects," Chap- 
man said it'll bring people to 
Manhattan for performances," 

Chapman said the facility will 
add to tbe services that K-State 
uffcrs. 

"It'll help maintain and im- 



prove services that equine ath- 
letes and equine services will 
have," he said "It'll provide us 
with additional space and oppor- 
tunity to deal with space and 
horses who need services to be 
done." 

Chapman said the addition of 
the standing MRl machine that 
is included in the funding will be 
beneficial to the college. 

"The equipment is limited in 
the central U.S." he said. 'To 
have those capabilities in the 
teaching hospital will be very 
unique for this area 

"Anytime that you can let 
folks know that you will have 
top -of- the- line equipment and 
services and the opportunity to 
learn and use that type of equip- 
ment that professionals use is ob- 
viously very attractive for incom- 
ing students." 

Teresa Slough, head equestn 
an coach, said the facility will 
help the equestrian team consid- 
erably 

"It'll benefit the team tremen- 
dously in terms of practicing and 
recruiting," Slough said. 

The current equestrian train- 
ing facility is several miles away 
from campus at Fox Creek Sta- 
bles. Slough said having the facil- 
ity heated and close to campus 
will help since the team trains 
during the winter. 



"With it being on -campus, it'll 
eliminate weather-related com- 
plications," she said. 

Slough said having the center 
will help with recruiting as well. 

"Nothing will help us more 
than having a nice facility right 
on campus," she said 

Janice Swanson, interim de- 
partment head of the Depart- 
ment of Animal Sciences and In- 
dustry, said the center will help 
the department. 

The department offers an 
equine certificate program There 
were 42 people enrolled in the 
program from 17 different majors 
in the 2004-05 school year 
Swanson said the animal science 
program helps students who 
have owned or plan to own hors- 
es. 

"It adds enhancement to their 
degree or it's for people who own 
horses and anticipate that they 
will own horses for the rest of 
their life and want to acquire 
knowledge about horses," she 
said. 

Another aspect of the pro- 
gram is a therapeutic riding pro- 
gram for children with cerebral 
palsy, Swanson said. 

"Children are often able to 
connect to an animal and learn 
to care for another being and get 
an emotional attachment," she 
said 



Student counselors selected for 
Wildcat Warm-up recruitment program 



By Matthew Schlobohm 

KANSAS STAtirrjLlt&IAN 

Helping new K State stu- 
dents get an early start on a 
successful college career will 
be the job of 20 students se- 
lected as counselors for 
K State's Wildcat Warm Up 
program 

Wildcat Warm Up, which 
runs June 10 12 and 17 19. is 
an optional program offered to 
new students, in addition to 
the university's orientation 
and enrollment programs 

The purpose of the weekend 
is in retain and incorporate 
new students at the university 

Through the program, stu 
dents entering K-State in fall 
2005 get the chance to cstab 
lish connections with K-State 



Mudents, faculty and staff prior 
to the start of school. They 
also learn about student suc- 
cess strategies and 
K-State traditions, such as the 
Wabash Cannonball and the 
K-State fight song 

"This (program) has the 
chance to be a long term tradi- 
tion for the campus," Emily 
Lehning, coordinator of new 
student services, said 

Last year's session was in- 
credibly moving," Lehning 
said "The students {who at- 
tended) said they were feeling 
more comfortable and conli 
dent because they already had 
friends and connections, es- 
pecially the out-of-stalers 

Rachel Harriett freshman in 
pre journalism and mass com- 
munications, said she is excit- 



ed to get to know the new stu- 
dents and show them around 
the campus. 

"I'm really looking forward 
to the chance that to make an 
impact on the freshmen's 
lives," she said. "1 can show 
them how much I love K-State 
and hope to get them excited 
about K-Slate" 

During the program, new 
students will take part in many 
small-group discussions, 

which arc centered on the 
themes from each event, Lehn- 
ing said another goal the pro 
gram is to allow students to 
grow mentally, as well as so- 
cially 

"We do a lot of life-applica- 
tion skills testing," she said 
"We want them to learn inde- 
pendence' 




Teacher, 

reciation 

Week 

Chi Omega Sorority would like t 





Farmer's market opens 
for season in CiCo Park 




«Mtat*am ifinimni 

Ken Cravens organises brownies at the (Ko Part F timer's Market Wednesday afternoon. Known by some as The Pie Guy,' (ravens and Ms 
wife, Sandy, focus soWy on idling home-baked goods as compared to vegetables and other produce. The market will be held from tour 
to sewn m the evening every Wednesday. 



By Wendy Haun 

KANSAS STATE (OUJGMM 

Every Wednesday after- 
noon, many local farmers 
begin setting up shop at CiCo 
Park. 

The farmers' market, a help- 
ful tool to many local farmers, 
is often a good way to make 
money and advertise their 
business. 

It is also on Saturdays from 
8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Fifth and 
Humboldt streets 

Rick Wiedmann, a farmer 
from Onega, Kan . said this is 
his third year of selling at this 
particular market, but he has 
been selling at other markets 
since 1995. 

He said money is a big por 
lion of why he sells 

"This helps to supplement 
my income. It's a way to stay 
in business," Wiedmann said 

Sandy Cravens, Wamego 
resident, said she and her hus 
band. Ken, participate in two 
farmer's markets: Manhattan's, 



and a Saturday market in 
Topeka Cravens said they 
used to sell vegetables at the 
markets, but realized that 
baked goods sold better 

Cravens' popular sellers are 
their "pot -pic sized fruit pies," 
which come in a variety of fla- 
vors, from apple to gooseberry 

Cravens said money was 
not (he only reason she sells 
are the market 

"Money is part of it, but 
there's also the fun atmos- 
phere and the people," she 
said 

"We're third-generation farm 
ers; our family has been farm- 
ing the land for many years, so 
this helps supplement our in- 
come" 

Mindy Wilson, Manhattan 
resident, said the market is a 
good leaching tool for her chil- 
dren 

it's educational I've been 
home-schooling my children 
for eight years now, and this is 
teaching them how to run a 
small business," she said 



If you go 
Fanner's Market 

cCKoPark 

n: A to 1 p m Wednesdays 

: Fifth and Humboldt streets 
n: S a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays 



"It's also leaching them 
marketing - how to market 
and to understand the value of 
money and how to relate to 
the public" 

Wilson, who sells heirloom 
spinaches and radishes in the 
spring and tomatoes in the 
summer and fall, said this is 
her second year of selling in 
the market. 

She is currently exploring 
ways to become an organic 
fanner, and her products are 
currently pesticide-tree 

i didn't become concerned 
with pesticides until I read 
about them in a magazine. 

"Now I feel comfortable 
about what I'm feeding to my 
children," she said 




I 



SPORTS 



Page 6 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Thursday, May 5, 2005 




NATHAN RYEBSON 



4 years 
filled with 

sports 
memories 



Time has flown by and the 
years have been land to me here 
st K-Slale 

I gradu- 
ate from this 
sports -en 
thused uni- 
versity in 
less than 
two 
weeks, 

and "sadness" is a term I have 
started to use frequently. 

However, my time at K-Slate 
has given me some of the best 
memories that 1 will be able to 
look back on for as long as 1 live. 

My life revolves, to some ex- 
tent, around sports, so it would 
only be natural that a large part 
of these memories be sports ori- 
ented, and 1 thought I'd share 
some of them. 

Sept. 22, 2001 

My first K- State football game 
ever, and my first college football 
game at that The New Mexico 
State butt-kicking took place on 
my birthday. I was never into 
college football, but after watch- 
ing this game, my foot slowly 
crossed the line from NFL foot- 
ball to the college level 

This was also my first experi- 
ence with the ''Wabash Cannon- 
ball" The Wabash is as addictive 
as it is fun. It will be played at my 
wedding reception on May 28. 

Football 2002 

There were too many good 
memories from this year to pick 
just one I refer to 2002 as the "if 
our kicker didn't suck, I would 
have a national championship 
shirt" year. This was the year that 
I developed a hatred for 
K-State kicking, and at the same 
time developed a devoted love 
for college football 

One of the best games 1 have 
ever sat through was the win 
over Southern California, which 
was the only blemish on the re- 
sume of Heisman quarterback 
Carson Palmer 

Football 2003 

1 like to refer to this season as 
the "what if" season. 

What would have happened if 
Ell Roberson had not gotten 
hurt, and the Wildcats beat Mar- 
shall at home on September 20, 
2003? 

{(•State spiraled into a three- 
game losing streak, but still 
found itself in a 6CS bowl 

How did that happen? 

Dec 6, 2003 

This was probably the best 
game I've ever seen in my entire 
life K-State made it to the Big 12 
Championship and everyone 
said not to worry because 
K-State had no shot at heating 
the No I team, the undefeated 
Oklahoma Sooners. 

My, how they were wrong. 

A Darren Sproles highlight 
barrage, and a perfect Roberson 
performance led K State to a 35- 
7 beating of the Sooners, and 
landed themselves in the . , 

Fiesta Bowl, Jan. 2, 2004 

I hitched up the wagon and 
traveled to Tempc, Ariz., where 1 
was treated to the best road foot- 
ball experience of my life. The 
city of Tempe was great, and 
even though we lost, it was still 
one of the top five football games 
IVe ever seen 

Highlighted by Roberson 's 
sexual debacle before the game, 
and getting screwed by the refer 
ees at the end of the game, 
K State's first appearance in a 
BCS game was one for the 
books 

roo4haB2004 

I would like to forget this sea- 
ton ever happened, because the 
I have from this 
ilgrtingin 
the grass lot before each game 

The time I have spent at 
K-State has changed my life in 
terms of sports and Ufa goals. 

You got me hooked, It-Stale. 

t am aping to buy my tickets 
lor next year and 1 plan to make 
the trek to Manhattan every 
weekend and poanbty a trip to 
Oklahoma on October 10 to 
watch K-Siatc put it to the Soon- 




cast-tMl beast 



BASEBALL 



K-State cruises to easy win 




Chri* Hantwlnckei | [OUKUN 
Stand baseman tired Gotdert dives for I ball in the hole. It-State wilt face Oklahoma Friday at Tointon Family stadium In the first eta thiee name homestand. 



Wildcat s 26 

hits key to 

victory 



By Nathan Hyerson 
KANSAS STATI C0UEGAN 

A mid-week beating of the 
Washburn Ichabods was just 
what the Wildcats needed to get 
back on track heading into a 
crucial Big 12 scries this week- 
end. 

"The guys had a pretty good 
approach tonight with what they 
were trying to do." Coach Brad 
Hill said. "It was good to see, 
and hopefully it will carry over 
into the weekend" 

K-State took the field and put 
up an offensive barrage Wash- 
burn was unable to stop 

K-State posted 26 hits and 22 
RBI on its way to a 26-7 victory. 

The Wildcats got their of- 
fense going early, scoring three 
runs in the second inning led by 
a home run from junior Joe 
Roundy. 

K-State never let up as the 
Wildcats managed to score in 
each of the next six innings, 
highlighted by an eight-run 
eighth, during which K-State 
sent 1 3 batters to the plate and 
managed four hits while draw- 
ing five walks. 

Every K-State position play- 
era managed to get a hit on the 
night 

Washburn scored three runs 
in the fifth, which was spurred 
on by a two-RBI single by Jesse 
Schmidt 

Schmidt ended up 4-of-5 on 
the night with two RBI 

Washburn picked up 17 hits 
on the night, but only managed 
seven runs. 

"(Washburn) is a pretty good 
hitting ball club," Hill said. 
"When we got the ball up in the 
zone, they hit it" 

Junior Steve Murphy led the 
barrage for the Wildcats. Mur- 
phy went 4-of-tj on the night, 
with two home runs, a double 
and a single He contributed 
four of the team's 22 RBI 




Cairlna Ration | (OtlHMIf 
KStaWsStewlilUnphysmllwaslwqoswih^ 
lead. Murphy werrH-lw 6 with two home runs, four RSIindflw to hite the WMcatsn a 2t>-7wta over Washburn. 



"I felt great out there tonight," 
Murphy said. "The biggest thing 
about this game, after the losses 
to KU, is that this is a great game 
to get us back on track, heading 
into a weekend series with Ok- 
lahoma," 

Junior David Baker drove in 
a career- high six runs, and be 
came the first player since Tim 
Doty in 2003 to drive in six or 
more runs in a game 

Senior Terry Blunt also had a 
good offensive showing, by 
going 3-of-6 with two RBI. 

Senior Sean Clancy (1-0) ob- 
tained his first win of the season 
after pitching 12 innings in re- 
lief of starter junior Brett 
Muegge Clancy gave up two 
hits and walked one Washburn 
batter. 

Muegge pitched 4 1 innings 
for the Wildcats and gave up 
three runs on eight hits. 

"He wasn't really aggressive 
tonight," Hill said. "We want 
him to try and get through five 
(innings), but he didn't manage 
to do that tonight He just hasn't 




Chrii HafwwIrttM | tOUEGIWi 
Senior Terry Blunt watches a tingle roll into center fleW during K Stat* s gam* against 
Wsihttrn Wednesday najrit at Tointon Family Stadium. Blunt went ! for-* at the plate 
to help the Cats to a win. 



shown enough consistency" 

Hill said overall, he was 
pleased with his team's mid 
week performance. 

"It was a much better ap- 
proach then we have had in the 



past during the mid-week," he 
said "Hopefully it will carry 
over into the weekend." 

The Wildcats next face Okla- 
homa in a weekend series at 
Tointon Family Stadium. 



MEN'S GOLF 



Van Cleave named All-Big 12 selection 



By Ban Fallln 
KANSAS SMTtCOtltriUM 

Senior men's golfer Matt 
Van Cleave became the second 
K State golfer to be selected to 
the All-Big 12 team on 
Wednesday Van Cleave 1 ! se- 
lection marks the third consec- 
utive season the Wildcats have 
had a men's golfer named to 
the All- Big 12 team, as former 
Wildcat Aaron Watkins re- 
ceived the honor in 2002 and 
2003. 

Head coach Tim Norris said 
In a release he (eels it was the 
hard work Van Cleave put in 
this year that pushed his game 
to a new level. 

"It's realty a big honor 
when you play in a conference 
like the Big 12." Norris said. 
"He has just gone to work on 
his game and he has stayed fo- 
cused. When he came to 
K-State he was a good player, 



but he's really worked on his 
game and taken it to a new 
level and it has paid off. 

"I think he's still got his best 
golf in front of him this sea- 
son" 

So far this season, Van 
Cleave has led the Wildcats 
with a stroke average of 72 41 
per 18 holes, He has had six 
top-five finishes this season, 
including his current streak of 
three straight. 

Van Cleave won Big 12 
Golfer of the Month honors in 
February, a month in which 
the Maryville, Mo., native won 
the Matlock Invitational, as he 
shot 4-under par with his three 
round total of 212. Van Cleave 
finished fourth in the Big 12 
Championship last weekend, 
the highest finish for a K State 
golfer since 1970 when Doug 
Gray finished in third. 

Along with being named to 
the All Big 12 team. Van 




Kansas State senior 
Matt Van Chmm 
watches a tee that 
sail toward the 
fairway during* 
tournament last 

SsffnCnVf - ¥ dW 

Oawwas 
selected to the Ml 

Big 12 team. 

Chrti 



Cleave was also selected to the 
Big 12 All-Academic First 
Team for a second consecutive 
yew. 

Van Cleave was voted onto 
the 10 -member All -Big 12 
team by the league's bead 
coaches. K Stale it now just 
one of five schools to have a 
member of the All-Big 12 teem 
the past three seasons The 
other teams are Baylor, Okla- 



fltlMT 

home, Oklahoma State and 
Texas. 

Other main award winners 
included Oklahoma's Anthony 
Kim named Big 12 Player of 
the Year, Oklahoma Slate head 
coach Mike Holder was named 
the Big 12 Coach of the Year 
and Oklahoma State freshman 
Pablo Martin was recognized 
as the Big 12 Newcomer of the 
Tbar, 




Okafor 



1 -MINUTE 
DRILL 

The Associated Press 

NBA | Charlotte's Okafor 
wins Rookie of the Year 

NEW YORK — Charlotte Bobcats 
forward Emeka Okafor won the NBAs 
Rookie of the feat 
award 

Wednesday, the 
first former 
college player to 
win the award In 
four years. 

Okafor, the 
No. 2 overall pick 
m the NBA 
draft led all 
rookies in 

scoring (15.9 points per game) and 
rebounding ( 10.9 rpg) and was second in 
hes class behind Atlanta's Josh Smith in 
blocks 1 1 71 ) He also ranked second in 
the NBA wtthj.8 offensive rebounds per 
game. 

He ended fib season with 47 games 
in double figures in both points and 
rebounds 

Okafor received 77 of the 126 first • 
place votes from a media panel He 
finished with S 14 points while Chicago 
Bulls guard Ben Gordon, Okafors 
teammate at the University of 
Connecticut, was second with 43} points. 

CFB | Big East, ACC settle 

lawsuit over defections 

HARTFORD, Conn — The Big East 
and Atlantic Coast conferences have 
ended their lawsuits over school deftc- 
tkms with a multi-million dollar agree 
ment. 

The presidents of Connecticut, 
Pittsburgh, Rutgers and West Virginia 
signed off on the agreement which 
drops lawsuits between the confer 
ences, their member schools and 
officers Commissioners of both leagues 
also endorsed the deal 

The settlement obtained 
Wednesday by The Associated Press, 
didn't specify the monetary amount 
each Big fast school will receive, but a 
UConn bank statement shows SI 
million was deposited in the school's 
account on April 21 by the law firm 
charged with disbursing the settlement 
cash. 

The Hartford Courant which first 
reported the settlement said the 
agreement was worth about SS million. 




* 



Bonds 



MLS | Bonds undergoes 3rd 
operation on knee 

SAN FRANCISCO - Barry Bonds 
had a third operation on his injured 
right knee, the 
latest setback In 
the slugger's 
rehabilitation, 
he said on his 
Website 
Wednesday. 

Bo nth 
underwent 
arthroscopic 
surgery 
Monday in 

Southern California as doctors tried to 
dean out an infection, first draining 
fluids from his knee, according to a 
journal entry from Bonds posted on 
his Web site 

The surgery was first reported by 
the San Francisco Chronicle The 
newspaper reported Bonds would take 
antibiotics for at least two weeks and 
could not resume his rehab until 
doctors are assured the infection Is 
gone. 

Bonds already had operations on 
the knee Ian il and March 17 to 
remove damaged cartilage 

NFL | Army knew Tillman 
died from friendly fire 

WASHINGTON — Army officials 
knew within days of Pal Tillman's death 
that the former Nf I player had been 
killed by fellow Rangers during a patrol 
In Afghanistan but did not Inform his 
family and the public for weeks. The 
Washington Post reported 

A new Army report shows that 
Gen. John P Abiuid, the theater 
commander in Afghanistan, and other 
top Army officials were aware an Inves- 
tigation had determined the death was 
caused by an act of 'gross negligence* 
four days before a national ty televised 
memorial service, the Post reported 
after reviewing nearly 2,000 pages of 
documents it had obtained 



NFLjQBHasselbeck 

released by Redskins 

ASH6URN,Va - Tim Hasselbedt 
was released by the Washington 
Redskins on Wednesday, 1 1/2 weeks 
after they picked Auburn quarterback 
Jason Campbell in the first round of the 
draft 

WHh Patrick Ramsey now expected 
tostaaMartBninellanejfpenenced 
option as the backup and Cam obeN 
added to the roster, Hassetbeck was the 
odd man out. 

Hassetbeck played m seven games 
foe Washington in the /00J season. He 
tempfettd 95 of 1 77 passes far um 
yards wtthrrvetMKhdowm and seven 



I 






ARTS | ENTERTAINMENT | SEX | FOOD | YOUR LIFE 

THE EDGE 



Thursday, May 5, 2005 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 7 



Above the action 




CKrii Hanewlnckel | COLIEGIAN 
Nathan Minn, senior In finance, left, Luke Young, graduate student In college student personnel services, center, and Josh Duerfeldt, senior in management, witch TV in the Laramie Plaza apartment complex, touted over AggievHIe, 



Apartments in Aggieville popular; 
potential tenants on waiting list 



By la<«y Store* 

MNWSMTKOtLIQAN 

Luke Young likes a lot of things 
about where he lives Campus is only a 
few minutes away so he can walk to 
class He has seven of his close friends 
IrviOg in the same complex 

Then- is iko a liquor store across 
I he street and about IS bars just up the 
block 

Young, graduate student in college 
student personnel services, is one of 
(hose lucky people who lives in Ag- 
gieville Young lives in the apartments 
above Sun Connection Inc. tanning 

siiluti 

The perks of living in Aggieville are 
many The bars are right outside the 
front door, there's always action going 
on and there are no worries about dri- 
ving home drunk 

Young said never having to worry 
about leaving his car overnight or hav- 
ing a designated driver is a nice luxury. 

"It's pretty easy (to get 
around}," Young said "It's a lot safer 
than living farther away from Ag- 
gieville You don't have to drive 

Aside from the close proximity to 
the bars, the view can be quite interest 
ing as well, Young's roommate, [osh 
Due rfeldl. said he and his roommates 
have seen some interesting things, 

"We get to watch the DUIs and ihe 
police arresting people," Ducrfeldt, 
fifth year in management, said. "And 
we've also seen a couple of fights from 
our window, so it's pretty entertaining" 

Duerfeldl said they also had an ad- 
vantage on snow days While other 
students are stuck at home, him and 
his roommates can still make it to the 
bars. 

For many reasons, a large number 



of students want to reside in the spaces 
above Aggieville Moreen Morgan, 
property manager of Diamond Real 
Estate, said the apartments are 
snapped up as soon as they are adver- 
tised as available. 

"They are really popular," said Mor- 
gan, property manager of Diamond 
Real Estate Management, which man 
ages the Aggieville Penthouse apart- 
ments, above Gei Gei's and Zotcis At- 
tire "We used to have a waiting list, 
but they go pretty fast " 

A limited amount of apartments 
available also makes demand high The 
penthouse apartments have seven two 
bedroom spaces, and the ones above 
Sun Connection have five apartments, 
ranging from two to four people Alto- 
gether the apartments house a total of 
30 people 

Not everything about living in Ag- 
gieville is great. For one, the amount of 
noise can make for a hard time sleep- 
ing 

"For the first few months it's hard to 
sleep," Young said, "but you get used to 
it. You learn to drive the sound out. 
I'm sure if I moved somewhere quiet, it 
would be really weird" 

Another drawback is the amount of 
people that flood the area on certain 
special occasions Parking becomes a 
problem when drivers park their car 
where they shouldn't. 

"On St Patrick's Day and game 
days, you're pretty much blocked in 
and can't move for the entire day," 
Duerfeldl said 

Still, this is a residence that Young 
and Ducrfeldt said they will be sad to 
leave when they graduate 

"This is definitely going to be an ex- 
perience we remember," Ducrfeldt 
said 




Josh Barlh, senior In biology, cooks pancake* at his AggievfHe apartment Tuesday 
Aggieville over the past few years. 



Drew Rom | (OtlEQAN 
Barttt has enjoyed living in 



Columnist learned lessons of love in college career 




As I enter the last leg of the 
semester, it's hard to believe that 
my career asa 
K-Stalt student 
almost over. Of 
L.mrse, I can't help 
but reflect on the 
things IVc 
learned dur- 
ing my time tMXt *TO«Hi 
at K- State 

A lot of these lessons have to 
do with journalism, living with 
multiple roommates and navi- 
gating Aggieville 

And of course, I've learned a 
few things about love and dating 
along the way. 1 entered college 



a naive, starry-eyed dating 
novice and I am leaving., well, 
more experienced at least 

So, in my final hurrah as a 
Collegian columnist, I'm sharing 
with you a few of the things I've 
learned in the past four years, 

- Don't meat around with 
your ex- boyfriend's friends, 
roommates, fraternity brothers, 
ex-frat brothers or friends of 
friends. If there's any chance at 
all that they know the person 
you're hooking up with, and es- 
pecially if theyVe hung together 
at all, then it's not a good idea 
(unless you really want to piss 
them off). It onty makes for hurt 



feelings and sticky situations. 

- It you get invited to a for- 
mal, make sure you really know 
your date, or at least know 
somebody also going to the for- 
mal. That way, if your date de- 
cides he doesn't want to talk to 
you and abandons you and 
you're stuck in the Ozarks, you'll 
have somebody to keep you 
company 

- If you learn to enjoy being 
single, you will be a lot happier 
in life Unless you are a serial 
dater, you will probably spend 
the majority of your time going 
solo. It's important to realize this 
time can be fun and doesn't 



need to be spent moping be- 
cause you're alone. 

- Playboy bunny costumes 
get the job done. Whether you 
are trying to seal the deal with 
your steady or land that crush, 
wearing a leotard, fishnets and 
bunny ears will always help you 
out A fluffy tail doesn't hurt ei 
ther 

- If you are sick of dating the 
same old college hoys, try dating 
somebody older. The person 
could offer a new perspective on 
things. And if he or she has a 
real job, like, say, being a profes 
sor, he or she will have money 
to take you out. But beware, if 



you date somebody older than 
you, your social agendas might 
be a bit different: like going to 
bed at 1 1 00 p.m., when you're 
getting ready to go out 

Of course, these are just a few 
of the many, many lessons I've 
learned about love and dating 
during my college career Hope- 
fully the knowledge I've ac- 
quired will be enough to help 
me survive dating in the real 
world 



NIELSEN TV 
RATINGS 

1 . "Desperate Housewives; (ABC), 
8pm Sunday, 17,278,000 

2. "American UW- Tuesday," (FOX), 

7 pm Tuesday, 16.662,000 

J.-C51,*(«S),8pm Thursday 

16,547,000 

4. "American Idol- Wednesday; 

(F0X), 8 p.m Wednesday, 16,749,000 

5"Sunrrw>r:PaUu,"(ttS), 

7 p.m Thursday, 13,797.000 

6. treys Anatomy," (ABC), 

9 p.m. Sunday, 12,42 J.000 

7. "Everybody loves Raymond," 

(CBS)8pm Monday, 11, 3S6.000 

8. "House," (FOX), 8 p.m Tuesday, 
11,589,000 

9. "Cold Case,* (CIS), 7 p m Sunday, 
11,287,000 

10. "C5I: Miami," (CBS), 

9 p.m Monday, 11,305.000 



Uory Sttnr ■ a mojot In 

icntoaialoartt 



SOAP OPERA 
RECAPS 

"All My Children" 

The much- married Erica Kane has 
second thoughts about becoming Mn. 
Jackson Montgomery once again Tad Is 
strangely drawn to Junior's new nanny, 
Di. (Could it be 'cause she's really Dixie? 
Hah.} Elsewhere, Zach Is tempted by 
Maria's beauty, but resists her allure. JR 
charms Kendall, who finally gives Zach 
an answer to his marriage proposal. 

"As the World Turns" 

Though M olden stilt doesn't want to get 
back with Lily, he listens to luclnda's 
fears about Keith and discourages Lily's 
blossoming romantic friendship with 
Julia's brother Meanwhile, Jennifer and 
Mike are not happy when they leam it 
was Katie who told Craig that Jen's 
baby is his Dusty s hands look dirty 
when Craig disappears from Oakdale 
under mysterious circumstances Cella 
clues in Alison about Will's weird 
behavior. 

"The Bold and the 

Beautiful" 

Refusing to believe that Ridge saw 
Taylor alive, Stephanie and Brooke 
agree to get him some medical help 
Thomas makes an admission that 
touches Brooke's heart Thome brings 
Eric and Stephanie news that utterly 
disgusts them 

"Days of Our Lives" 

In their continuing search for Georgia, 
Bo and Billie follow a new lead into 
dangerous territory Meanwhile, John 
tries in vain to stop Shawn, Brady, Rex 
and Lucas from leaving Salem to fescue 
Philip. 

"Guiding Light" 

Olivia is overwhelmed by guilt. A secret 
admirer angles to tempt Reva into bed. 
Will the self proclaimed "Slut of 
Spnngfidd" betray her marriage vows 
to Josh ? Eager to save Gus from danger. 
Hariey charms Mallet — her ex - 
husband turned prison warden — in 
hopes of gaining his aid to saw her 
man. Dinah scolds Edmund for sinking 
to even sleazier lows In his quest to win 
back Lassie's affections 

"General Hospital" 

tmily finally tells Nikolas that she was 
brutally raped by his evil double, 
Connor. (Talk about an awkward 
conversation, huh?) Sonny issues Ric an 
ultimatum Still troubled after AJ's 
brainwashing, little Michael is 
disturbed by an unpleasant memory 
about his mom, Carty. 

"One Life to Live" 

lohn has an uncomfortably dose 
encounter with the Killing Club 
murderer. Todd shares his fearful 
feelings with Blair, who responds in an 
understanding Fashion Rex discovers 
something very mtnguing about 
Daniel. Bo has something to say to Nora 
about her new husband 

"Passions* 

While toasting Sheridan's misery, 
Alistair makes Beth an indecent 
proposal, later, Sheridan descends Into 
Beth's basement and rememben all 
about her kidnapping and captivity 
there — she then issues Luis an 
ultimatum. Spike and Sam fight over 
Jessica. Sam is furious when he teams 
more about his underage daughter's 
secret life as a barfry. 

"The Young and the 
Restless" 

When a fraternal fkjht erupts between 
Makotm and NeiLDru frets mat the 
truth about Liljrt paternity will be 
exposed. Meanwhile, a crtsh brings the 
l*ewfnanf*rrwTy together and draws 
Illy and Daniel closer 



\ 



. 



-t; 



Page 8 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Thursday, May 5, 2005 



Sheet music sale raises money for awards 



By Nathan Dorutt 

KANSAS SMTKOlUtilAN 

Students looked through 
boxes of sheet music, records 
and compact discs on Wednes- 
day trying to find a deal. 

Craig Parker, associate pro- 
fessor of music and secre- 
tary /treasurer for Pi Kappa 
Lambda, the national music 
honorary society, said pro- 
ceeds from a sale, which took 
place in the McCain courtyard 
area on Wednesday afternoon, 
go to receptions and awards 
for outstanding K State stu- 
dents, 

"The sale gets lots of mate 
Hals in students hands they 
wouldn't have been able to af- 
ford, otherwise," Parker said 

The sale carries sheet music 



for people starting to play the 
piano to expert pianists, he 
said 

Jamie Rogers, senior in 
music education, said he was 
looking for music to help him 
leam how to play the piano 

"It's fun to laugh at some of 
the old music, '70s and '80s," 
Rogers said. 

Kori Wells, junior in music 
education with a dual empha- 
sis in percussion and piano. 
Found an X Ray Spcx album 
from late 1978 for less than 
online. 

The sale normally raises 
$500 by the end of each sale, 
Parker said, 

"It provides music students 
and others with an opportuni- 
ty to find music they can't find 
anywhere else," Parker said. 




Chrii HaiMwIocfcai | COUECIAN 
Mary Koran, tenicr In musk education, loots through a collection of plana pedagogy books 
Wednesday afternoon in the tcavengood Courtyard hi McCain Auditorium, The oarage sale 
was put on by Pi Kappa Lambda. 



Honor System director leaves legacy of fairness after retirement 



By Angle Hanson 

KANSAS SWHOUEGIAN 

There is a poster on Phil An- 
derson's office door displaying 
the message, "Honesty is always 
the best policy." When entering 
his office, the same poster is 
hung on his wall. 

Since Anderson, public 
speaking professor and director 
of the Honor Council at 
K-State, helped to develop and 
implement the current honor 
system, it is obvious why hon- 
esty is important to him. Now 
he's retiring as the director of 
the Honor Council. 

"I believe Phil is truly a man 
of integrity," Loni Jensen, grad- 
uate student at K-State and past 
honor council member, said. 
"The lines of Phil's personal life 
and professional life are blurred 
- he believes in everything he 
says 100 percent" 

That is why he's devoted the 
last six years of his life to fur- 
thering the existence of the 
honor code and system, which 



was put into effect in 1999, An- 
derson was on (he committee 
that formulated the wording of 
the honor code constitution 
and bylaws, and now he main- 
tains the system. 

He said he believes the 
honor system is not only crucial 
for K-State's reputation, but for 
fairness when dealing with stu- 
dents. 

"It is important because any 
academic Institution at any 
level ought to have an institu 
tionalized universal policy that 
methodically addresses acade- 
mic honesty," Anderson said. 

In Anderson's office, there is 
another poster advertising the 
importance of influence and 
not power 

Hclene Marcoux, associate 
director of the honor council, 
said Anderson's actions defi 
nitely speak louder than his 
words. 

"Phil walks the walk, but he 
does not talk it," Marcoux said 
"I have the utmost respect for 
the man - he walks on water." 



The thing about Anderson 
i hut is so special, Marcoux Mid, 
is that he is an advocate for stu 
dents. 

"He treats students with dig- 
nity," Marcoux said "He's not 
about policing students but 
about helping them leam." 

In return, Anderson said, his 
last 25 years at K-State have 
been a learning experience 
When Anderson came to Man 
hattan in 1980 to teach public 
speaking at K-State, no one 
knew how much he would af- 
fect the university. 

"He's empowered people 
along the way to help move for- 
ward as an individual and learn 
more about what we're doing," 
Jensen said of the progress of 
the honor system. 

As the 2005 school year 
comes to a close, Anderson's in- 
volvement in the honor council 
system is winding down be- 
cause he has more free time, he 
said. 

"It takes a lot of time and en 
crgy," Anderson said "I need to 



free up some lime before I be- 
come an old geezer" 

While the honor system is 
important to him, there are 
other areas he wants to pursue 

"1 like writing, reading, p<.li 
tics, and f have a rental proper- 
ty interest," Anderson said. 

"I'm in the process of com- 
ing up with a mechanism to 
make sure all Manhattan rental 
property is safe and complies 
with the current building 
codes" 

Although Anderson looks 
forward to his newfound free- 
dom and future endeavors, he 
said there is one thing he will 
miss most in regards to working 
with the honor council - the 
people 

"What I will miss the most is 
working with the wonderful 
people associated with the 
honor system and all the people 
who believe what they're doing 
is important," Anderson said 

"1 loved meeting people from 
every department and every in 
stitution" 



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Kansas man campaigns 
to ban state's sex shops 



By Brlgette Burandt 

KANSAS SIM! COUIGIAH 

There is a campaign in 
Kansas to ban adult shops. 

Phillip Cosby, 54-year-old 
retired Army master sergeant, 
is attempting to convince peo- 
ple to form petitions in order 
to ban adult stores in Kansas 

His campaign began about 
a year ago in Salina when 
Cosby spoke with people 
about the issue. 

Cosby intends to persuade 
people to begin using a sel- 
dom-used Kansas law that al- 
lows citizen petitions to form 
grand juries, which only start 
if locai officials are reluctant 
to act after a problem has 
been pointed out to them. 

"My goal is to be in every 
county this year that has a 
pornography shop," Cosby 
said. 

He has already begun talk- 
ing to people in Wichita, 
Great Bend, Hays and Tope- 
ka 

Students at K-State seem 
to have divided opinions on 
the issue 

Some say that people 
should have the right to 



"It's always 

tough to limit 

people's choice 

to do what they 

want. But 

sometimes it's 

best to guide 

people in a 

better direction." 



HadkyStorte 
FlfTH Vf AH IN ABCHirtaURE 



choose where to shop 

"1 think adults should be 
allowed to go into adult 
stores," Jodi Culbertson, ju- 
nior in hotel and restaurant 
management, said. 

"It's a personal choice, I 
have no problem with if 

Hadley Stolte, fifth year ar- 
chitecture student said 
Cosby's campaign might be a 
good thing. 

It's always tough to limit 
people's choice to do what 
they want," Stolte said "But 
sometimes it's best to guide 
people in a better direction.'" 



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Thursday, May 5, 2005 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 9 



First generation student sets example 



By Adam Hanki 
KAHSAS SIATt OXlEGIAh 

When Yvonne Adame came 
to K- Stale from Topeka, she did- 
n't know what to expect Being a 
flrat-generali on college student, 
she couldn't receive advice from 
her parents. All she could find 
was support 

"We didn't have the chance to 
go, but we sure wanted her to 
make sure she did," said Ranald 
Adame, Yvonne's father. 

Yvonne Adame knew she 
wanted to go to K-State, but 
everything else, from applying to 
enrollment, was a mystery, She 
had to tackle it all on her own 
And when she finally made it to 
K-State, it just complicated 
things 

"Basically, the first time 1 saw 
a college campus was my first 
day of classes," Yvonne Adame 
said. 

"Her first year we were so 
confused, we didn't know what 
to do," Gin a, Yvonne Adame 's 
mother, said 



Letting her daughter move 
away to an unknown setting was 
a hard experience for Gina 
Adame, She didn't know what 
her daughter was going to be 
subjected to, and it was hard to 
send her into the world. 

"We're a really close family, 
and it was hard to let her go, but 
she has accomplished so much," 
Gina Adame said. 

It didn't take long for Yvonne 
Adame to find her place at 
K- Slate Before long, she joined 
the Hispanic American Leader- 
ship Organization. She became a 
multicultural ambassador, a 
member of the Multicultural Stu- 
dent Honor Society, represented 
multicultural student organiza- 
tions on the Honor Council, was 
part of the Multicultural Alumni 
Council and president of HALO. 

And now, weeks before she 
graduates, Yvonne Adame is 
being recognized. 

On Wednesday night the 
K-State Alumni Center acknowl- 
edged the leadership of four mul- 
ticultural students graduating 



this semester, including Yvonne 
Adame, at the Multicultural 
Graduate Celebration. 

Yvonne Adame was shocked 
to team of her recognition 

"It's really exciting, because 
I've been involved in so many 
multicultural student organiza- 
tions and it's nice to be recog- 
nized for all my work," she said. 

The award was presented to 
Yvonne Adame by Maria Teresa 
Martinez-Ortiz, an adviser to 
Adame and a visiting assistant 
professor of modem languages, 
who was able to watch her ma- 
ture over the last two years. 

"She is a natural leader," Mar- 
tinez-Ortiz said. "What I've been 
observing is that she has always 
been willing to recruit hispanic 
students. She does it without an 
agenda. She does it from the 
heart." 

While she was a multicultural 
ambassador, Yvonne Adame 
would travel from Kansas City, 
Kan., to Garden City, Kan., re- 
cruiting students, using her love 
for the college and her success 



story to draw them in. 

Now, after dedicating so 
much time to the university, 
Yvonne Adame plans on head- 
ing back to her home in Topeka 
after graduation. 

"I'm really excited about 
graduating, but I'm starting to get 
sad, seeing all my mentors and 
friends I'm leaving behind," she 
said. 

After Yvonne Adame be- 
comes the first member of her 
family to graduate and heads 
home her younger brother, Alex, 
will be starting his own K-State 
experience But he will have a lit- 
tle more experience under his 
belt, compared to his sister. 

"She's already introduced me 
to a lot of people," he said, "I'm 
ready to move out of the house 
and start growing up" 

Yvonne Adame hopes the 
college tradition won't end. 

"My kids, my grandkids, 
we're all going to be Wildcats," 
she said. "I may be the first one 
to come here, but I won't be the 
last" 



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May/August 2005 




Mayl6-June3, 2005 
August 1-16, 2005 



77/ne /a Running Out. Enroll today t To enroll and/or obtain an Interseeuon schedule with complete course descriptions and prerequisites, visit our woo ami at 
twp/fwww *■<» Hbu eoV. It you prefer, can (789) 532-5566 or 1 •800-432-8232 or visit (he Division of Continuing Education at i:ii College Court Building, 
1615 Anderson Ave., Manhattan, KS 

Tufflon tor on-campua oouraework will be $146 per undergraduate resident credit hour and $206 per graduate resident credit hour, plus SI per day epecial and hearth teee. A student 
services lee and/or metariat* tee may be required tor some course* ASM per credit hour tee is assessed lor Engineering and Architecture course* 



GQUBBtTBI* 
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ARCHITECTURE, PLANNING ft DESIGN 
Appreciation of Architecture 
Design Graphics and Visual Thinking 

ARTS ft SCIENCES 

Understanding Islam 

Human Form and Composition 

Field Botany 

History of World Christianity since 1453 

The Untied States in World Wei II 

OW-Cempue American Studies Fighting. Close and Savage 

Grant ve Lee-The Overland Campaign, 7864 
Anchor* AweigA History of the United Stales Navy, 1775-2006 
Psychology of £*erdse and Sport Injur/ 
introduction to Weo Communication 
Mass Media Producftotv InDeatgn 
Mas* Media Production: IWueUMor 
Medical Sociology 

Sociology of me Criminal justice System 
Diversity and Socle) Interaction In the Workplace 
American Ethnic Identity and Culture In Writiag Poetry 
Commurecetton end Terrorism 
Elementary Statistics rm the Social Sciences 
I Sustne** and Economic Statistic* I 
Business and Economic Statistics I) 
Dramatic Comedy and the) Psychology of Humor 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Introduction, lo Total Quality Management 
Leadership tot Practitioners 

EDUCATION 

Leadership and Spirituality 

ENGINEERING 

CAD in Engineering and Conanucrjori 

Introduction to LEED 

Introduction to Information Technology ( 

Introduction lo Microcomputer Spreadsheet Apptfcatton* 

introduction to Microcomputer DataoavM Application* 

Introduction to Mtoocomputat Word Processing Applications 

Pre- Engineered Metal BuUdmge 

Introduction lo Total Quality Management 

HUMAN ECOLOGY 

Body Image: Family and Cultural Context 

Coping wift lite Crises 

The Process ol Divorce The Good, the Bad, end the Ugly 

Alcohol and Drug Addiction 

Aging and rh* Cinema 

Premenlel Education and Counseling 

wme ft Cutnary Tour ot Castor nia Wine £ounlry 

AUQUST 

ARCHITECTURE, PLANNING ft DESIGN 

Appreorimon of AfoMtscture ffj^ 

ARTS ft SCIENCES 

Understanding Islam 

Se q uential imagery LMhogaaprry and Qoofcbtoding 

Tha 5000 Day War The Gurt from 1*01 to the f rees W 

MaM Media Production mOeilp/i 

Me** Med* Production: matrait* 

SOUOATtON 

Leadership and "-Spirituality 

ENGINEERING 

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to Worm 

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ARCH 301 


94503 


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94508 


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94511 


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5/17-6/2 


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94514 


3UG 


5/16-5/27 


BIOL 687 


94515 


3 UG/G 


5/1 8-6/1 


HIST 200 


94516 


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571 6- 6/2 


HIST 200 


94518 


3UG 


5/18-6/2 


HIST 502 


94593 


3 UG'G 


5/16-6/3 


HIST 533 


94519 


3 UG/G 


5/16-6/2 


KIN 591 


94520 


3UG 


5/16 6/2 


MC 450 


94523 


3 UG 


•j-6/3 


MC 450 


94595 


3U6 


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94596 


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6/16-6/3 


SOCIO 301 


94525 


3UG 


^' IIS- 6/2 


SOCIO 361 


94526 


3UG 


5/16-6/2 


SOCIO 670 


94527 


3 UG/G 


5/16-6/3 


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94522 


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'>6/2 


SPCH 450 


94524 


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STAT 330 


94530 


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94533 


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EOADL 502 


94541 


3 UG/G 


5/16-673 


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94551 


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94553 


2 UG/G 


5/16-5/27 


CIS 101 


94554 


1 UG 


5/16-5/18 


CIS 102 


94555 


1 UG 


5/19-5/23 


CIS 103 


94556 


1 UG 


5/24-5/27 


CIS 104 


94557 


1 UG 


5/31-6/3 


CNS644 


94560 


2 UG/G 


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DEN 300 


94566 


1 UG 


■: 16-5/19 


FSH8 300 


94563 


3UG 


5/16-6/2 


FSHS603 


94561 


3 UG/G 


5/20-5/31 


FSHS 700 


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94565 


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MTWUF 9 00 AM- 1230 PM 
MTWUF 1 30PM-50OPM 



TWU 12:30 PM-5'00 PV 
MTWUF 830 AM-2:30 PM 
MTWUF 8:00 AM- 12:00 PM 
MTWU 12:30 PM 4:30 PM 
MTWU 8.00 AM- 11.30 AM 

MTWU 800 AM 11 30 PM 
MTWU 6 00 PM- 10:00 PM 
MTWUF 9:00 AM-12:30 PM 
MTWUF 1U1U AM-2 10 PM 
MTWUF 6:00 PM-10:0O PM 
MTWUF 1 .00 PM-5:00 PM 
MTWU 6:00 PM-10;00 PM 
MTWU 6.00 PM-930 PM 
MTWUF 1OOPM-4:O0PM 
MTWU8'O0AM-12:2OPM 
MTWUF 1 0OPM-3.3OPM 
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MTWUF 8:30 AM-1 1 45 AM 
MTWUF 8 30 AM- 11 46 AM 
MTWUF 1,30PM-5:QOPM 



MTU 5:00 PM- 10 00 PM 
MTWUF 4:30 PM 7:30 PM 



MTWUF 100PM-5.00PM 



MTWUF B.OO AM-12.00 PM 
MTWUF 1 00 PM 4:00 PM 

MTW 800 AM- 12:10 PM 
MUF 8.00 AM- 12: 10 PM 
TWUF 8:00 AM 11:10 AM 
TWUF 9 00 AM-1 1 TO AM 
MTWU 8.00 AM-1100 AM 
MTU 5.00 PM- 1 0.00 PM 



MTWU 1 0OPM-430PM 
MTWUF 900 AM-5 00 PM 
MTWU 8:15 AM- 12:30 PM 
MTWUF 9 00 AM- 1200 PM 
MTWUF 9:00 AM-12 00 PM 
MTWUF 5:30 PM-9.00 PM 
SuMTWUFSe 6:00 AM-SOO PM 



MTWUF 9:00 AM-12 30 PM 



MTWU 1 00PM-5;00PM 
MTWU 9:00 AM-4,30 PM 
MTWU 6 00 PM- 10.00 PM 
MTWUF 6:00 PM-10O0 PM 
MTWUF lOOPMfxOOPM 



MTWUF tOO PM-500 PM 



MTWUF 8:00 AM- ID 15 AM 
MTWU 800 AM-1 1.1 AM 
MTWF 8:00 AM- 11 10 AM 
MUF 600 AM-12 10 PM 
TWUF 8:00 AM-1 1:10 AM 
MTWUF 6.00 AM-S;0C PM 



MTWU* 1:00 AM-0 .00 PM 
MTWU 1:00 PtMAO PM 
MTWU 8:15 AM-1 2. 30 PM 
MTW'-FOOOAM 1I0OPM 
MTWUF 8:00 AM 6.00 PM 
MTWU? 9:30 PM 6 00 PM 
MTWU * JO AM- 12 'JO PM 
MTWU t 00 PM-8 0C PM 



MTWifF ftX AM-1 1 30 AM 



S7(vS7 ,1/ 1 



QORSE. IN FOR MAT' ON BY CHECKING THE VVfc 3 SfTE PRIOR TO THE FIRST DAY OF CLASS 



Division of Continuing Education 
www.dce.ksu.eduflntersGssion 




**• Tr *-* ^ % ■— > ♦ 



^^^^^^^^^B^W^P^^P - 



CLASSIFIEDS 



To place an advertisement call 



Page 10 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 

020 



Thursday, May 5, 2005 



II I I I I 
| I I |_i 



I I I I ^ || I I I I 




LETS RENT 



1051 

For flent 
Aprs Fumlshi 



STUDIO APARTMENTS 
On* Nock from campus 
Ample parking, quirt oondi- 
lions Furnished of unlur 
nishwd June and August 
Sail. (785)539-3638 

MOaBBaBsaaaasaBstaBBsl 
For Rert- 
Apt. 
Unfurnished 

ISOO Large two-bedroom 

Dishwasher, disposal, ten 
Ira ah June 1 Pels oh 
(785)317 7713 

WSi MONTH Early Bird 
discount offerl Four -bed- 
room, Iwo and one-hall bath 
town home with washer/ 
dryer provided. Call 
(785)537-2111, 

1016 BLUEMONT One 

and iwo bedroom June 1 
(785)3177713 

1126 BLUEMONT- Studio 
apartments with all bills 
paid Neutral colors with 
nice carpels Overlooking 
Aggievilie with oft street 
periling. Save on parking 
permits and walk to campus 
Available June 1 No pets 
(784)31 3-481 2. 

1215 PONYTZ One-bed- 
room basement apartment 

wrih neutral colors and lull 
sue windows Urge walk-in 
due* Al bets paid S*?5 
August No pets (785)313- 
4812. 

1219 KEARNEY Two bed- 
room August, year lease 
Mo pets Water' trash paid 
Across street Irom campus 
1650 (785)539-5136. 

1844 ANDERSON, new 
construction, tmee-bed 
room, two bath, personal 
washer/ dryer, highspeed 
internet, available June 1 
1 7S515S4-34S6 Or (786)565- 
1310 

350 N ISIh. a block to cam- 
put, two-bedroom apart- 
ment, central-air. dt&hwash- 
■T, No pets August ih rough 
December five month 
lease 1570/ month 
(785)539-0549. 

350 N 16th A block to cam- 
pus Five minute wait to Un- 
ion or AggteviHe Two-bed- 
room apartments Big bed- 
rooms, central air. dish- 
washer. Washer/ dryer on 



August lease Call for exert 
ing details (785)539-5508 
No cots or dogs 

511 SLUE MONT two b*d 

room basement, new 
range, laundry, no pets 
June or August S430 plus 

utilities (785)313-0462 

626 VATT1ER Two- bed- 
room spacious apartment, 
laundry facilities Water/ 
trash pet) One year lease 
August t 14.10. (785)539- 
8704 

814 THURSTON: Two-bed 
room, June year lease. No 
pels. Water/ hash paid 
8800, (7SS)B39-ai36, 

•IB RATONE One-bed- 
room downstairs 5425 617 
Kearney, one or two-bed- 
room upstairs. $425 BIO 
Colorado, basement etti 
cktncy, S275 No pets Au- 
. (785)776-0548 



A ONE BEDROOM June 

1 1704 Fairview 1100 
Kearney (785)317-7713 

A TWO-BEDROOM, nice 
large dishwasher, central 
a* One year or 6 month 
lease {786)317-7713 

BLOCK TO CAMPUS: Spe- 
cious two-bedroom No 

pats Water and trash rur- 
n.»r**j (7M)53a-4»»*. 

HORSE LOVERS: two-bed- 
room homo. Close 10 town. 
Includes room for iwo hors- 
es (7t8)S17-9718. 



CRESTWOOO APART- 
MENTS West side two- 
bedroom, one and one-hall 
baths Personal washer/ 
dryer, fireplace, pool Waler. 
trash, cable paid No pets 
S570- 1870 (785,776-3345 
crtjstwopd-apar1mehls.com 

NEW 12-PLEX avsilable 
June. Two-bedroom, luxury 
apartments 1010 Bluemont, 
two ADA friendly $800- 
$825/ month (785)776-2102 
or (785)556-2014 No pets 

NEW DUPLEX, three-bed 
room Central heat/ air, 
washer/ dryer hook up. dish 
washer, off- street parking 
two full baths, water and 
trash paid. Don't miss this 
one! (785)341-2931 Of 
{785)776-3218. 

NICE ONE BEDHOOM qui 
«t walk to campus Across 
from Aggieville For June 
and July, lease half price 
(765)317-5178 

ONE AND two-bedroom 
apartments, many close to 
BUtpUl •vil' 1 Wli slier dryer 
No pets Call (7851341-1950 
or (765)341-3385 

ONE, TWO. three, lour bed- 
room apartments and hous- 
es June and August 
leases No pels Call 
(785)539 1975, (785)313- 

I M 

ONE- AND two-bedrooms 

Walk to campus, covered 
parking. June 1 and Aug t 
leasee, very nicel (785)34 1 - 
6000 

ONE BEDROOM AND Slu- 
dlo apartments One-bed- 
room. $260/ month Studio 
$260/ month AH utilities a* 
cept etectnc paid Lease 
and deposit required Avail- 
able June I (785)537-7794 

ONE-BEDROOM APART 
MENT close to campus 
1030 Kearney Jury/ August 
lease available No pels. 
trash paid Call Aaron 
(816)729-6642 

ONE-BEDROOM apart- 
ment. 1225 CI all In $415' 
month plus deposit No pels 
(785)456-281? 

ONE -BEDROOM apart- 
ment. Gas/ water/ trash 
paid Laundry tacilrhes One 
yaw lease June I . $380.00. 
(7»)53»6704. 

ONE-BEDROOM NEXT to 
Trash and water 
Available June 1 

or August 1 (785)313-7473 

ONE-BEDROOM WITH 
neutral colors lor August 
Across from City Park with 
off -street parking Local 
landlords who care and 
maintain the property Wa- 
ter/ trash paid No pels 
(785)313-4812 

ONE -BEDROOM, AVAILA- 
BLE August Close to cam- 
pus Water/ trash paid Cen- 
tral oir (785)637 7810, 

ONE-BEDROOM TWO 

blocks to campus and Ag- 
gteville Washer/ dryer 

Pi-I:, ,» (785)31 7-7713 

PRE LEASING JUNE and 
August Some units brand 
new. dose to KSU, washer/ 
dryer Included. Call tor de- 
tails (785)776-2102 or 
(785,556-2014 No pets 

THREE-BEDROOM ADJA- 
CENT to campus. AH major 
appliances, off-street park- 
ing, water and traah paid 
(785)584-1197. 

THREE -BEDROOM CLOSE 

>ue Central air, 
laundry facili- 
ties No pets (785)539- 
asW 



TWO BEDROOM APART- 
MENTS. Available June, Ju- 
ly, and August. 1114 Bar- 
trand ($560). 1200 Fremont 
($600- $640), 701 N 91h 
($500- $550). 2014 Sealon 
($530), 523 More. ($530) 
363 N 14th ($520- 600) 
www.rent-apm.com, 
(78S»3»-4357. 

TWO-BEDROOM. ONE 
bath Close to campus 

1828 Anderson Water and 
hash paid (785)341-4496 

WALK TO CAMPUS Spa 
clous two-bedroom apart- 
ments, lots ol windows, qui- 
et oondflions, ample park- 
ing, furnished or untumish- 
ed. washer/ dryer in apart- 
ment reasonable rent 
June and August No pels 
(785)539-3638 



For Renl- 

Houses 






$1000 FOUR BEDROOM 2 

balh duplex Only four 
year* old. Good sued bed- 
rooms Juno Emerald Prop 
erty Management [785)556- 
6699 

$1200: FOUR-BEDROOM, 

TWO bathroom duplex, 
three blocks from campus 
and Aggieville One year 
old. available August 1 CaH 
Brian al (785)845-81 12. 

$435 TWO BEDROOM du- 
pJex with central air and 
washer/ dryer. August 
Emerald Property Manage- 
ment (785)556-6889 



NEAR AGGIEVILLE tour 
bedroom house, central air- 
conditioning, off-sheet park- 
ing, 11000 per month plus 
utilities (785)537-8070 

NEW LISTING: Available 
soon. Three-bedroom, two 
baih Large living room. 
game room, computer room 
Located at 918 Bert rand, 
washer/ dryer, central air. 
yard, from porch (785)539- 
3672 

NEW SPACIOUS four-bed- 
room duplex, two bath, two 
lull laundry, game room with 
wM bar 928 Osage $1200 
(785)539-1564 

NICE HOUSES for rent 

Three, four, five and eight- 
bedrooms Close to cam- 
pus. June. July and August 
leasee Cal Cliff (620)242 

7823 

ONE BEDROOM HOUSE 
close to campus 1010 N 
11th street No pets, trash 
paid, summer lease availa 
ble Call Aaron (816)729 
6942 

RENT-APM.COM, NOW 
leasing houses, apart- 
ments, and duplexes Avail- 
able now June, July , and 

(785)539-4357 

THREE. FOUR, five-bed 
room houses Close to 
campus. Off Street parking 
Washer/ dryer June and 
August leases (785)449- 
2181. 



FEMALE HOUSEMATE No 

drinking/ smoking (2757 
month. One-third utilities, 
washer, dryer. August 
lease, amlca913ttksu.edu 
or (785)537-1464. 

MALE WANTED Three- 
bedroom, washer/ dryer, 
central air, July lease $300/ 
month, one-third utilities 
(785)392-4856 




1733 KENMAR, A GREAT 
yard for barbecues and 
fun. Spacious house Three, 
four-bedrooms A 

ces Close to 

Please call (785)539-1 177 

725 MORO. Nice four-bed- 
room, near campus, Aggie- 
ville Large detached ga- 
rage, washer' dryer, dish- 
washer $1008/ month. 
Available June l (913)710- 
4730 

A CLOSE els or five-bed 
room, two balh. central air 
Dishwasher, washer, dryer, 
pats okay June 1 
(785)317-7713. 

CUTE THREE-BEDROOM 
two bath house tor rent 
One mis «reat of KSU $625 
ptusuWttaa (785)317-8484 

FOR RENT: Three bed- 
room, two bath new home 
Washer/ dryer Garage 
Available June 1 Great Val- 
ue-, (620)532-1775 

FOUR-BEDROOM. TWO 
and one-halt bath at $975/ 
month (785)537-2111 or 
centu ty21 hnajhteorn, 

FOUR-BEDROOM, TWO 
bath duplex 1410 Houston, 
half me* from campus, laun- 
dry, single property landlord 
No smoking, no pets 
$1150/ month, August I. 
(7851778-9260 



THREE -BEDROOM 


OU- 


PLEX, Available 


June 


Traah and mowing 


paid 


Central ir Washer,' 


dryer 


[785)537-7810 





THREE -BEDROOM 
HOUSE, 1516 Campus 

$900/ month Close to Vet 
Med Teaching Hospital. 
June lease (720)733-1659 
evenings after 7.00pm 

THREE BEDROOM 
HOUSE, 3500 Chippewa 
Circle. Wests! d> Large, 
corner lot. Available June 
ot July Call (785)539-1975, 
(785)313-8296 

THREE-BEDROOM 
HOUSE, lower level Three 
blocks east ol campus 
Available June i or August 
1 Off-street parking One 
bed or alt (785)556-0098 or 
(785|457-3476 

THREE-BEDROOM 
HOUSE. June/ August aval- 
able 11200 electric/ gas/ 



FOUR-BEDROOM, 
bath house Washer/ dryer, 
great location Spacious in- 
terior Some pets okay Aug 
1 lease (913)963-7422 



FOUR-BEDROOM, TWO 
bath large house Close to 
campus. Washer, dryer, 
dishwasher, air $250 each 
person (785)776-2100. 



AND three-bed 
Close to campus 
Spacious, J a hw aahar, cen- 
tral air, laundry tatiittes. No 
pats (788)8 Mi 0888 

TWO-BEDROOM/ ONE 
bathroom, Nice old home 
near park and campus wa- 
ter/ trash paid. pets. Aug 
1 (913)218-4482 



LOOKI BRAND NEW 
HOUSE) Four-bedroom, two 
bath Washer/ dryer .refnger- 
ator. central sir One -ha If 
mile to campus August 
lease. 1400/ month Under 
construction 1614 Pierre 
(785)304-0387, (785)778. 
9124 

IstWIINNow. 1019 Moos" 
Ion Three-bedroom with 
day room upstairs Kitchen 
spptanoes Near City Park, 
downtown, and Aggieville 
S84S (417)823 9460 

THREE-BEDROOM AVAIL 
ABLE June Close to cam- 
pus Fenced yard Pals on 
approval (7S»)M7-7810 



dryer shared with basement 
(785)341-6807. 

THREE-BEDROOM HOU5- 

ES and apartments. June 
and August teases Close lo 
campus No pets (785)539- 
t975 or (765)313 8296 

THREE -BEDROOM HOUS- 
ES and apartments starting 
at $750- $1100 Close to 
campus June and August 
leases No pets (785)539- 
ig75 or (785)313-8296 

THREE BEDROOM. ONE 
balh 730 Pottawatomie 
Washer/ dryer, fndge. stove. 
dishwasher, central wr One 
car garage wtth big back- 
yard. $825/ month. 
(785)207-0212 

TWO YEARS old Four- 
bedroom. two and one-halt 
balh ALL appliances includ- 
ing washer, dryer, micro- 
wave Great Hoot plan with 
large bedrooms No pets 
August $1200 {785)858- 



1109 Kearney A Block to 
campus Two-bedroom 

apartment, washer/ dryer. 
S475 all bill a paid. Two 
month lease June and Jury 
No pets (785)317-3021 

ALL BILLS paid, tour bed 
room, two bath, pool, inter 
net. washer/ dryer As scon 
as possible Contact Devon 
(913)406-7236 

APARTMENT FOR sum- 
mer sublease. Nice two- 
bedroom apartment Quiet 
location $500, Call 
1786)776-0009 

BOY OR girt 1250/ month, 
Fall 2005- Spnng 2006 
1725 Anderson serosa Hie 
street from the Alumni Cen- 
ter Call Zack Clear 
(913)244-8473 

FEMALE SUBLEASERS 

wanted June and July 
Four-bedroom house, dean 
and spacious 618 Kearney 
Available mid-May. 

(785)341-6022 

FURNISHED. ACROSS the 
sheet Irom campus at 1729 
Anderson Four-bedroom 
female only, trash paid 
please call (765)539-9636 

HOUSE THREE-BED 
ROOMS available tor sum 

mer sublease Big house 
and bedrooms, good loca- 
tion (926 Laramie) Air-con- 
ditioning. furnished, great 
roommate Rent negotia- 
ble !( 620)353 - 8528 , 
(785)770-3457 

LARGE TWO-BEDROOM 
Iwo bath available June 1- 
Juty 29 Apartment complex 
is Campus East located at 
Clallm and McCain Lane 
Has pool, balcony, fireplace, 
dishwasher, and microwave 
Pets allowed Close to 
campus and Agojeviet, Rant 
is $265/ roommate or $530/ 
month (785)341-9257 

ONE-BEDROOM SUB- 
LEASE and three-bedroom 
sublaeae avarlabe lor June 
and July Emerald Property 
Management (785)556- 
6699 

ROOM AVAILABLE in tout 
bedroom apartmenl May 
July 31 Close to campus, 
large rooms. Rem $215 (ne- 



HAVE VOU seen our slo 
mlnum hand 1ruck7 11 has 
several Student Publications 
markings and a label Per- 
haps it's sitting in a storage 
area waiting tor us lo re- 
trieve II. but we don 'I know 
where It was last used at 
the K-Stale Student Union. 
It's hard to do our deliver- 
ies Please call 785-532- 
6555. ask lor Pal or Jackie 



Post a Note 

We require a form of pic- 
ture ID (KSU. driver* li- 
cense or other) when piec- 
ing a post a note. 

housln R/ 
real i 



WILDCAT 

PROPERTY 

MANAGEMENT 

537-2312 

l507Poyna#l 
2 BD @ $525 
IS09Poyntz#. 
I LG BD @ $525 
washer & dryer 
ALL BILLS PAID 
June or August 



HOI 

For Rent- 
Aot. 

Untwisted 

PARK PLACE APART 
MENTS. Hurry" avaiabilily 
limited One- two Ihroo 
bedrooms (785)539-29*1 



For Rent- 
Apts. Furnished 

Manhattan City Ordinance 
4814 assures every per- 
son equal opportunity In 
housing without distinc- 
tion on account of race, 
sex. familial status, milita- 
ry status, disability, reli- 
gion, age, color, national 
origin or ancestry Viols- 
lions should be reported 
to the Director ot Human 
Resources al City Hall, 
(785)567-2440. 



JUNE. JULY August Now 
leasing one. two, three, lour 
bedroom apartments and 
houses www,renl- aprn.cnm 
(7Hr9SM3S7 



TOWN 

HOMES 

WAh 4BL£ 

1 Bio 



1013-1029 McColtum 
2 Bedrooms 



UNIVERSITY 
TERRACE APTS. 

Spanous 2 & i Btdrvm Apts 

Washrr/Drytr 

or Washa/Drya Hookups 

Spaaous Grounds & Pool 

NoPtts 
1530 College Ave. 

CALL 537-2096 
9 a.m. to 6 p.m. 




785-537 7701 



THREE AND lour-bedrooms 
available August Close lo 
campus Water/ irash paid 
Central air coin-operated 
laundry (785)537-7810, 
(785)537 2255 

TWO-BEOROOM APART- 
MENTS, duplexes, and 
houses Several locations 
Available June. July, and 
August, www reni-apm.com 
(785)539-4357 



110 1 

For Rant- 
Apt, 
UnlufnWsMl 



Three Bedrooms 
Near Campus 



ISSSAndenon $780 

5loNUmSf 1750 

l22SRotone $73*' 

519NMonhotlon #733' 

1019 Fremont $660 



Brookside Mgmt 
537-1746 



STUDIO APARTMENTS, 
629 Humboldt, S340, 1521 
Leavenworth $350. air, June 
occupancy, bills paid 
(785)539-8401 

THfiEC BEDROOM 
APARTMENT Vary nice 
$610 June 1 Aug I, Near 
Aggieville (786)537-2661. 

THREE BEDROOM AT 81S 
N 10th SI $720. 8JSO 930 
Osage $735. utilities paid: 
June occupancy (785)639t 
6401 

TWO-BEDROOM APART 

MENTS June 1 Washer/ 
dryer Pels negotiable 
(785)539-9582 



1101 

For Rant- 
Apt 

Unfu< 

$475. CLEAN, roomy two- 
bedroom, one and one- half 
bath in nine plox No pets 
One-year lease 3032 Kim- 
belt (785)538-8846 

AMAZING STUDIO with lire- 
place One block east ot 
campus Pels allowed 1 Con- 
tad Rachel ai (317)753- 
1723 Available June 1 

AVAILABLE AUGUST 1 
Dose to campus One-bed- 
room apartment (785)567- 
0620 

AVAILABLE JUNE 1 Four- 
bedroom duplex, 500 Lara- 
mie B. $285/ room. Iwo 
baths, washer/ dryer, central 
air, dishwasher CaH 
(785)410-2916 



NOW LEASING for Summer 
and Fall 1 Spacious one and 
b»MMH BM bsVbbJ 
ad on this page. Westches- 
ter Park 

ONE, THREE AND four 
bedrooms No smoking, no 
dnnlting. no pets (785)539- 
1564 

ONE. TWO. three and four- 
bedroom apartmenl s Close 
to campus and Aggievilli> 
Dishwasher, laundry, and 
parttirvg. (785)537-601 7 

ONE. TWO, three bed- 
rooms Available June and 
Augusi (765)537-7138 or 
(785(313-1256 

ONE BEDROOM AND stu 
dios June 1 Pets negotia- 
ble (785)539-9582 

ONE BEDROOMS AND stu- 
dios Close to campus 
Avariable June and August 
w*w renlapm com 
(785)539-4357 



is* 



Worth raking a Look At 

come join a Winning 
TEAM !!! 

Supervisors, Partners & Co-Mona^rs 

Full Time and Pin Time Positions are NOW 

Available for both Day Shift and Night Shift at 

Sonic!" 

WE OFFER: Sonic offers 

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including: Ownership opportunities, 

paid vacations, health insurance, dental 

insurance, flexible hours, uniforms, 

paid training and career stability. 



Relocauon is a possibility. 



Please call Malo at 

785-539-7007 to 

set up an interview 



. 




i)i 

May rent paid. (785)341 
3535. 

ROYAL TOWERS: One- 
bedroom, one bath $430/ cy. (788)538-6 
month June- July Available 
mid-May Dishwasher/ mi- 
crowave Call Jesse 
(316)518-8097 



TWO-BEOROOM. $650 
Three-bedroom. $750 

Ctoee to campus Washer/ 
dryer, central air (785)776- 
2100, 




GUVS SHARE s house 
1300/ month and share utwt 
las. Close to Dry Park After 
6 pm, cal (785)456-9109 



SUBLEASE CHASE Man- 
hattan Apartments, three- 
bedroom, avertable June I, 
tower level. $780 par month 
(785)53?-9961 

SUBLEASED NEEDED 
two-bedroom, one bath, two 
blocks lo campus, one block 
to Aggieville Rent $6607 
negotiable June/ July 
(785)539-4487 

SUMMER SUBLEASE one- 
bedroom n a two- bedroom 
University Commons. mid- 
May through July S2M plus 
one-half uWrtles (786)564- 
0126. 

VERY NICE ona-bttfraorii 

by the maN. Washer* dryer 
and dishwasher Available 
tor summer Rent negotia- 
ble Cal (786)770-2224 




NEED AN APARTMENT FOR 
FALL OF 2005 IN MANHATTAN? 

We offer Apartments and Townhouses 

throughout Manhattan. Kor a preview 
our properties, please visit our website at 

www.mdi-nianhattanxoni 



O lThpee: a F 

m Mbedrooms ■_ B 

$360-5520 « $500-5700 S750-S940 




JUNE. JULY & AUGUST 
LEASES AVAILABLE 



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I.M I MM 

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t = 



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ait 

r76-1744. 



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CONGRATULATIONS 
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The Wood* el Cherry 

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WITHOUT a 
TO staai a nWr 

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j ato* You tWtk 
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/ 



BSSBl 



Thursday, May 5, 2005 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 1 1 



Bowling, making dinner 
B perfect for inexpensive dates 



Anxiety, drug use main reasons 
for student sleep disorders 



By Christina Kan»n 

KANSAS STATF COUKMN 

Movie tickets: $16. 
Dinner for two: $32. 

"Concert tickets: $48. 

* Going out with your signifi- 
cant other every Friday night can 
be quite an expensive endeavor. 
However, sitting on the couch 
and watching the Daily Show 
isn't exactly a recipe for surefire 
romance 

AVhat's a poor college student 

to-OQ? 

Fortunately, Manhattan has 
plenty of date destinations ideal 
for a couple on a budget. Read on 
for five great dates, all under $10. 

Date #1: Go out for ice 
cream Who doesn't 
enjoy a scoop of Amer- 
ica's favorite dessert 
from time to tune? 

Whether you 

choose the Coldstone 
Creamery, Dairy 

Queen, or 

K -State's own Call 
Hall, you can't go 




wrung with something creamy 
and chocolaty 

Date #2: Bowl a few games at 
the recreation center in the Stu- 
dent Union. 

Look no further than the 
bowling alley for a little bit of 
friendly competition, and brag- 
ging rights for hours, even days, 
to come. 

Keeping score is optional, but 
laughing at your date's ridiculous 
rental shoes is a must! 

Date #3: Sit down for a nice 
cup of coffee. 

A coffee shop offers a relaxed, 
low-key atmosphere that is per- 
fect for conversation, and getting 
to know your dale a little better 

Radina's Coffeehouse & Bak- 
ery and the Bluestem Bistro, both 
in Aggieville, have just the right 
lighting and background music 
t» help you both unwind after a 
long week. 

Date #4; See some good live 
music Local bars such as Pi's 
and Rusty's feature performances 



by local and touring bands on a 
regular basis. 

Hear new music, stand shoul- 
der to shoulder in the crowd, and 
enjoy a few moments alone when 
you step outside for some fresh 
air. 

Dale #5: Make dinner togeth- 
er. Dining at a classy Italian 
restaurant may be romantic, 
but you can 
cook the 
same meal i 
in your own 
kitchen for a 
fraction of the 
cost 

Pick up some pasta, marinara 
sauce, salad, and crusty French 
bread at the grocery store, and 
light a few candles around the 
kitchen and dining room. Mak- 
ing spaghetti is a breeze, and eat- 
ing by yourselves beats a noisy 
restaurant any day 

Dates don't have to be ex- 
pensive to be memorable. After 
all, isn't it spending time with 
someone special that's really 
priceless? 





kt\MSMMI t Willi, U\ 

um Kiism. 



118KEDZIE • 532-6560 



»««* KANSAS STATE 



CLASSIFIED PAGE 



By Alex Peak 

IWKMSStATKOUl&IAN 

Sleep may seem like some- 
thing that can be pushed off 
of the priority list, but in real- 
ity, inadequate amounts of 
sleep can result in many seri- 
ous problems. 

The main problems that 
seem to affect college stu- 
dents are insomnia, apnea 
and sleep deprivation. 

According to a sleep guide 
published by the McKinley 
Health Center of the Univer- 
sity of Illinois at Urbana 
Champaign, "Insomnia is 
characterized by the inability 
to fall asleep, difficulty main- 
taining sleep or waking too 
early in the morning." 

Insomnia can occur lor 
many reasons 

Some of the more common 
causes are drug and alcohol 
abuse, depression and anxi- 
ety. 

"A lot of students have a 
variety of concerns, but anxi- 
ety is the predominate one," 
said Dr Aaron Carlstrom, a 
therapist at Counseling Ser 
vices 

Many students cxpen 
stress from school, relation 
ships and work that disturbs 
their sleep. 

Along with anxiety and 
stress is depression 

Relationship problems and 
the adjustment to college life 
arc two frequent origins of 
depression in students 



Ian Smith, a freshman in 
biology and psychology, has 
had chronic insomnia since 
he was a junior in high 
school. 

"I try to cut down on caf 
feine and try not to eat or 
read before 1 go to bed," he 
said. "I really just try to wear 
niysfll out during the day." 

According to the sleep 
guide, "Sleep apnea is when 
sleep is disturbed by brief in- 
terruptions of breathing." 

"Sleep apnea contributes 
to excessive daytime sleepi- 
ness, which can decrease cog- 
nitive functioning and impair 
performance at school or on 
the job," said a member of 
The National Institute of 
Health 

"College students m at an 
increased risk Tor sleep 
apnea, only for the reason 
that they might be chronical 
ly sleep deprived," said Dr 
Carl Hunt of iltc National 
Heart, Lung, and Blood Insti 
tute in an article published 
last fall about college stu- 
dents and steep. 

Those who are overweight, 
have high blood pressure or 
suffer from an abnormality of 
the throat, nose, or airwaj 
system are at high risk for 
apnea. 

According to a study done 
by the National Sleep Foun- 
dation, 63 percent of college 
students don't get enough 
sleep each night. 

Many students slay up late 



For more information 

II you find ttut you tie having sleep 
pfoblems, you can contact Latent 1 Health 
(enter by oiling 5)2-6544, or you can 
call Counseling Servites at 5 $2-6927 



to study or go out with 
friends and miss out on the 
seven to nine hours o( sleep 
that they need 

Sleep is essential fur daily 
functioning and mental and 
physical health 

Decreased amounts of 
sleep can cause a lowered im 
(nunc system, thus making 
you more susceptible to get- 
ting sick 

Carlstrom said there are 
several ways to help prevent 
sleep loss 

Getting plenty of physical 
exercise, keeping good gener- 
al health, preparing for stress- 
ful times, managing lime well 
and keeping a healthy social 
life arc a few ol the methods 
that can inhibit sleep disor- 
ders. 

According to the sleep 
guide, by uiing good sleep hy- 
giene, on. can avoid prob- 
lems 

By not talking on the 
phone, eating or doing wiirk 
in bad, sleep habits can be 
improved 

The sleep guide also advis- 
es that students' bedrooms 
should be quiet and dark and 
students try to follow a rou 
line every night before going 
to bed 



CLASSIFIEDS 




1 WD BEDROOM CLOSE 

io campus Prorate balcony 
Central air New carpet. 
Iisbwasher Juris leas* 
'78S}34 1-5070 




BIG HOUSE Six-bedrooms, 
two kitchens, two baths, two 
ivirig rooms Duplex Uvea 
:ied>oom Ail clean Good 
onOMon (78515372299 

DUPLEX LARGE lour bed- 
■oorrl, two and one-half bath 
ieai .campus and AggieviHe 
785»537«)t7 

HVfi AND six -bedroom 
'to use* {two kitchens) 
Available Jury and August 
Jenlral air. washer/ dryer, 
lishwasher, very nice Pels 
TQilMMa (785)539-9562 

nvJL.SIX and seven-bed- 

'00* • house | two- ttne« 
mlfjbns) Available June, 
Julys and August Several 
iQcaJMns www rem - 

tpfl ffOm If SS >5 39-4 35 7 

I OUTT AND five-bedrooms 
Avertable June and August 
(785)5377136 or (785)313- 
1256 

FOUR -BEDROOM HOUSE 
Washer/ dryer Nice large 
rooms Ott-slreet parking 
17851537 1566 

TOUR BEDROOM MOUS- 
ES and duplexes Several 
locations Available June. 
Julfc, and August Pets al 
lowed in most www rent- 
ripirtcom i/S5>S33 43S7 

FOWVetDHOGM. FOUR 
bad£oern Brand new con 
strwalion 1023 Laramie 

if' dryer, central an. 

qsher No pets 
[78fjS3fi-95ft2 

FOUrVBEOROOM. TWO 
bafh house 1715 Colorado 
Washer/ dryer and dish- 
Meaner Available June, Ju- 
ly, pr August 1)200/ month 
(786)539-0991 

FOUR BEDROOM. TWO 
ba*i, 918 Thurston, a* appk- 
anees. air-condrtioning. 
laundry Clean, no pets Off- 
strfel parking August lease. 
Si 000 plus utilities 

( 785)323-0061 . 

FOUR BEDROOM, TWO 
blot** (Tom campus 'S3* 
Hairy 11000/ month CM 
(706)294-0362 ot (785)336- 
Q2Q2 

FOtJR BEDROOM. TWO 
blocks west of campus 
2030 CoHega Heights. 1775/ 
bedroom Newty remodele d , 
Washer/ dryet, central heat, 
air £ondl(lon«r June 1 
lease (785)344-3491 Pets 
negotiable 

FOUR BEDROOM CLOSE 

to campus? City Park Wash 
er/- dryet and dishwasher 
Larpe house June lease 
(786)341-5070 

JUafE. JULV. August Now 
leasing one, two, three, tour, 
rrvei sti. seven, eight -bed- 
room houses and duplexes 
f anl-ap m.com. 
(7B5I53S-43V 



WiarMt' 
di shorts' 



WJ4JUJ.SJ1L 
(7Btt3B-435 

THVEBEDI 



TMQfE BEDROOM HOUS- 
ESrfpartmentjf.. and dupiei 
sa Jsverol locations Avarl- 
obkLjuns, Jury, and August 
Pets allowed in moal 
,r tnt-apm com 



NEW LISTING: 
soon. Three-bedroom, two 
bath Large living room, 
game room, computer room 
Located al 918 Bertram], 
wearier/ dryer, central an, 
yard trorrl porch (785)539- 

nn 

THREE-BEDROOM 
HOUSE on College View 
Close lo west side ot cam- 
pus Available June 1 $640/ 
month, (785)257-3469 Of 
( 765)4 79-0ZZ;> 

THREE BEDROOM. ONE 
bath house with den 
Range, refrigerator, washer/ 
dryer included Really dose 
to campus Musi see 
(765 1 46*501 4 

TH RE F BEDROOM, ONE 
bathroom $625 Available 
June t Washer' dryer Cen- 
tral air Pets negotiable 
(7851539-9582 

THREE BEDROOM. TWO 
bsth home Clean, newty re 
mod a led, new appliances 
Off street parking and ga- 
rage $900 rent Flexible 
lease starling data 
(785)3414515 




Nr W f INANi .1 Plan avails 
bta on 2002 and newer, two 
and three-bedroom homes 
Only $1000- $2000 down, 
easy credit approval, and It 
costs less then renting Call 
Today (765)539-5641 or 
(968)509-5325 (Terms and 
CondtKorw Appty) 



For Rent- 
Mobae Homes 

BRAND NEWI Two and 
three -bedroom manulac 
hired homes lor rent 
Comes with aH appliances, 
including washer/ dryer 
Rent prices starting al $550 
a month Call today 1 
(785)539-5841 (Terms and 
conditions appry) 




For Sale- 
Mr 

16X80' 2001 Sctturtz Sen- 
sation Three-bedroom two 
bath $29,500 or best offer 
(785)565-0724 

TWO-BEDROOM ONE bath 
mobile home Cats end 
artief dogs allowed Lot rent 
$145/ month $8000 or beat 
offer (785)567-7805 




AVAILABLE FALL: Male or 
female non-smoker. No 
pets. Three-bedroom 

Washer/ dryer Cable/ Inter- 
net $350/ month. 2036 Shir 
lay Lane (913)568-8233 
April 

FEMALE WANTED Share 

two-bedroom apartment 
Close to campus. $275/ 
month Cheap olsrhes 
Washer/ dryer and oil street 
parking. 
(316)6444219 



1461 

Roommate 
Wanted 

FEMALE WANTED Four- 
bedroom, two and one-half 
bath Vanity/ sink in each 
room One-fourth utilities 
One block tram campus 
Stan August 1 Jen 
(620)820 3747 Hannah 
(913|669-150I 

FEMALE WANTED Share 
two bedroom house One 
block to campus Available 
May 1 $250. all utilities 
paid. Can (785)537-4947 

MALE. 1320 Fremonl 
across from park, easy walk 
to campus/ Aggieville Two- 
bedroom, dishwasher, oven, 
nil utilities paid, $315, 
(/85)304 9600 

Nice three -bedroom home 
Fully furnished Pel friendly 
June 1 tease $225/ month 
plus one-third utilities Call 
Cam (785)3 17-3494 

RESPONSIBLE FEMALE 
roommates wanted for luxu- 
ry tour-l 
across 

campus No pats, no smok- 
ing, short lease okay 
(785)776-6318 

ROOMMATE NEEDED, 
June or August, $245/ 
month, one-third utilities 
about $60, heel paid, across 
from City Park Cal Adam 
(620)855-1101 

ROOMMATE WANTED as 
soon as possible $250 plus 
one third utilites Close lo 
campus Contact Anessa 
(816)806-6094 

ROOMMATES NEEDED 
pay one-fourth utlUUs* Nice 
house, lenced-m backyard, 
quiet nieghborhood Call tor 
delad. (316)461-73// 

ROOMMATES WANTED 
New three bedroom, two 
bath house August Lease 
Outside pets okay Caf) 
Brian (7851567-6447 

THREE CHRISTIAN ta- 
msles need roommate 
$300/ month utilities Includ- 
ed Washer/ dryer/ cable 
Call Kendrs (785)632-7159 

WANTED ROOMMATES lo 
share three-bedroom apart 
menl next to campus lipid. 
IM paid. Central air Wash- 
er/ dryer $325 each August 
1 or before (765)636-5446 
(786)566-3406 (785)$62- 
67SS. 




FEMALE SUBLEASER 
needed for June and Jury 
New three-bedroom two 
bath home Close to cam- 
pus and Aggieville Rent 
$300 (620)397.3625 

JUNE/ JULV Chase Apart* 
menl One bedroom m four- 



guyj 

$250 par month plus atec- 
(620)644-9627 or 

i ■mill I 

am. 

ONE B E OHOOM APART- 
MENT available lor June 
■ub lease Close to campus 
Also available for August 
lease price negotiable Can 
(785)34t-»a36, 

ONE BEDROOM SUB 
LEASE, pats allowed, dose 
to campus May rant paid, 
avsjtebte May 16 (913)424 
3777 



SUBLEASER NEEOED' 
Walk to school and Aggie- 
villa One-bedroom apart- 
ment $275/ month June 
through July Available May 
23 Call Roy (784)341 848? 

SUMMER SUBLEASE two- 
bedroom apartment Close 
to campus Call Chris for de- 
late (913)488-0118 

SUMMER SUBLEASE 
Roomy studio apartment 
One-halt block from cam- 
pus, off street parking, laun- 
dry access, water and trash 
paid Cak Dakota (765)227 
5421 

THREE ROOMS available 
in five-bedroom house 
June/ July Washer/ dryer, 
cheap utilities $250 each 
1011 Thurston Call 
(785)562-7323 Or {785)587- 
5787 

TWO ROOMS available in 
tour-bedroom newer apart- 
ment Washer, 1 dryer includ- 
ed Low utilities Close lo 
campus and Aggieville 
Rent $287 per month Cal 
(620)285-5992 or (620)793- 
2200 

TWO-BEOROOM APART 
MENT available for summer 
$520/ month Close to Ag- 
gieville Available June 
1005 Bluomom (785)537 
4426 

TWO-BEDROOM, ONE 
bath available now through 
Jury 28 Pool and laundry fa- 
cilities One block from cam 
pus $535 par month 
(785)231-9191 




The CoHeglan cannot veri- 
fy the financial potential of 
advertisements In the Em- 
ployment/Career classifi- 
cation. Headers are ad- 
vised to approach any 
such employment oppor- 
tunity with reasonable 
caution. The Collegian 
urges our readers lo con 



Bureau, 901 SE Jefferson, 
Topeka, KS 66607-1190. 
(760)232-0454. 

Manhattan City Ordinance 
4014 assures every per- 
son equal opportunity in 
securing end holding em- 
ployment In any Held of 
work or labor for which 
aha la property quail- 
of race, 



3101 



Help Wanted 

■BARTENDING 1 $300 a day 
potential No experience 
necessary Training provid- 
ed Call t -800-965-5520 exl 
144 

ATTN: ARCHITECTURE 
Students. Los Angeles 
baaed design firm In need 

of draftsman Looking for 
third or fourth-year stu- 
dent for part-time posi- 
tion. Make Los Angeles in- 
come with Kansas living 
cost Musi be proficient 
with AutoCad 2002 or later 
and be able to produce 
floor plant end detailed 
sections. Call JNH De- 
signs (310)754-9166. aek 
for Jerod 

CAMPUS MINISTRY Bund- 
ing Manager with apartment 
Locking, for male to share 
two-bedroom apartment and 
co-manage campus ministry 
buflriirig Paid utilities, free 
parking directly across from 
campus Begin August 15 
Call Devld at (785)539 
4261 

CDt DRIVERS FOR SUM- 
MER WORK Covnn World 
Wide Moving is looking tor 
college students with s 
Class A or B Commercial 
Driver's License tor lull-time 
summer work. Need lo stay 
tn town lor summer, stay in 
shape, and save some 
cash'' Great internship alter- 
native and take advantage 
of your existing lease/ rental 
agreement Job is lo per- 
form packing, loading, and 
delivery of household goods 
to our military and commer- 
cial customers along with 
driving CDL vehicle to a fo- 
cal jobsite Apply at soon as 
potsfcM at 61 5 S 1 tth St 
on Fort Riley Btvd Very 
competitive $9 00 to $1 1 00 
hourly/ incentive wages. Job 
begins immediately follow- 
ing Spring finals week 
through summer and option 
al part-time work in Fall ol 
2005 Equal Opportunity 
Employer 

FULL AND part-time posi- 
tions available tor tumitu'e 
delivery and installaiion 
Heavy Htling required Apple 
carl musl have a clean 
Class C driver's license Ap- 
ply in person al Furniture 
Warehouse, 2326 Sky-vue 
Lena, Manhattan Behind 
Bnggs Auto Lane 

GET PAID for your opin- 
ions I Earn 115- $125 and 
mora per surveyl 

www mgntyforey ryeyt.eo 

■ 

GRADUATE ASSISTANT 
SHIP In Educational Innova- 
tion and Evaluation, May- 
August, must be enrolled in 
six graduate level credit 
hours See 

www ksu edu/oaie tot de- 
scription and application in- 
structions Email 
cstiurnane ksuadu for more 
information 

GREAT SUMMER income 



3101 



Help Wanted 



n ati o nal origin or ances- 
try Violations should be 
reported to the Director of 
Human Resources at Cfty 
fiafl, |716)6I7-i441. 

FULLTIME SUMMER help 
Root truss rnenu- 



ers needed 40 hours ot tree 
training is required. Class 
starts May 31 runt through 
June 3, 8:00- 4 30pm. 
31 1 60 per hour, Contact 
Laborers' Local 1290. 710 
Moro lor an application or 
eaK (785)537 1567 

PERMANENT PAflT-TIME 
secretary Eso sr t anl tWHt St 



tocturfng plant, 6107 Murray typing and computer Vart- 

Rd, (788)776-5061 oua duties 



(765)539-2358 



HARVEST HELP 
We are currently looking for 
temporary wheat haryest 
help in Wichita, KS Job in- 
cludes scale work, and grain 
receiving, $9 00V hour over 
time is required Contact 
Debruce Groins Company 
Wichita. KS (800)733 8752, 
ask for Nell. Kern or Donnie 
Equal Opportunity Employ- 
er 

HELP WANTED tot custom 
harvesting, combine opera- 
tors and (ruck drivers Guar- 
anteed pay Good summer 
wages Ceti (970)463-7490 
evenings 

KITCHEN HELP warned 
FuH or part-time Apply in 
person 1 1 30 Moro 

LOVE 2 party' Love 2 
dance 7 Leva attention? 
Send Me An Angel m jusi im 
youl Minimum $70/ hour 
Contact (573)200-0474 
www tandmaanangalnow C 
urn Hiring Manhattan males 
and females 

LUBE TECH' Automotive 
Maintenance Specialist 
Part-time positions avaaabfa 
immediately Call (785)565- 
5260 with personal informa- 
tion 

MOVIE EXTRAS/ MODELS 
Needed! Young laces need- 
ed to fill a variety ol jobs' 
Candidates needed lot 
crowd and background 
scenes for local product ronii 
No experience required! All 
looks needed 1 Up to $22 
hoiirtyl Call (800)280-0177 
now tor more information 

NOW ACCEPTING applita- 
ftons tor part-time and week- 
end furniture sales Suc- 
cessful applicant will ba 
fnendry and neat in appear- 
ance Possess good cus- 
tomer service and sales 
skills Competitive wages 
Apply in person al furniture 
warehouse 2326 Sky-Vue 
Lane. Manhattan Behind 
Bnggs Aulo Lane 

NOW HIRING three interns 
for summer Open to ajl me- 
lon Gain career skills Ac 
counting, public relations, 
marketing, communication, 
travel, average earns $700/ 
week Call (7B5)3t 7-0455 
NOW HIRING Vista Dnve 
In. a locally owned and op- 
erated quick service restau- 
rant « adding to our learn 
Individuals musl have a pos- 
itive attitude end be sola to 
multitask and work wan with 
others in a fast paced envi- 
ronment We have multiple 
pan-time and a tew full-time 
positions available, musi be 
able to work during the day 
KSU students encouraged 
Wa offer meal discounts, 
flexible hours and promote 
from within Apply in person 
at 1911 Tmtle Creek Blvtl 

REFLECTION PHOTOGRA 
PHY is looking for a sell-rno- 
ttvated outgoing individual 
for a lull-time sales person/ 
office assistant Musl be 
available Tuesday- Satur 
day CaH (785)539-1 550 

RILEY ELEVATOR hiring 
tor immediate lull lime store 
dark, pan-lime negotia b le 
Oath handling preferred 
Cuetomer service and abdity 
to Wt 50 lbs a musl Contact 
Debbie st (765)485-2216 

SUMMER KITCHEN help 
needed Please apply al 
Kite's Bar and Grill, 615 N. 
I2fh Street, m Aggieville 



3101 



Help Warned 

SCHOLARSHIP OPPOR- 
TUNITIES and h 
Ministry Experience He re I 
First Prosbylenan Church 
1 Youth Groups Youth 
Group Advisors Seeking 
young adults at 18-25 who 
would ba interested in work- 
ing with our Junior and Se- 
nior High Fellowships We 
are looking for Chnsl cen- 
tered young adults who 
have a heart for youth and 
spreading the Gospel Mes- 
sage Not lo mention having 
a good sense ol humor and 
an ability to relate to teem 
agera 

2. Music: Contemporary 
Worship Service 5:00 on 
Sundays We are looking lor 
young adults who would like 
to ba a part of a worship/ 
praise band (learn) instru- 
mentalists needed: piano 
(keyboardl. guitar bass. 
■M (Mfflujafaj 

3. Drama: Do you have 
knack lor drama and a heart 
tor the Lord? Drama team 
members wanted for Con- 
temporary service Help us 
communicate the gospel 
message in new ways lo 
reach everyone/ 

If you would like to learn 
more please contact us al 
Firs! Presbyterian (7B5J537 
0518 or email slartttl'rst 
ptasmanhattan corn In M 
Faith. Pastor Anne Scheiber 

STEEL a Pipe Supply Com- 
party has an opening tor a 
Systems Analyst Position is 
responsible for business 
process design testing, 
training, and support Quail- 
flcabone include B S degree 
In business, computer sci- 
ence, or related field Must 
have general knowledge ol 
business processes Candi- 
dates should submit reaurne 
to Personnel Department 
Systems Analyst PO Box 
1688, Manhattan KS 
66505 Equal Opportunity 
Employer 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 

Inc. has a part-time position 
lor a Macintosh technician 
available immediately The 
tech support team maintains 
about 50 Macintosh work 
stations, providing software 



ing general hardware main- 
tenance Applicants should 
have some experience with 
Mac OSX server and be fa- 
miliar with design software 
such aa Adobe Photoshop. 
Adobe InDesign and Quark 
Express Any experience 
with networking, program 
mmg or with UNlxAmux « 
also helpful Pay starts al 
$7 50 per hour with the op- 
portunity to advance Only 
students cunentfy enrolled 
in spring 2005 for al least 
six hours at Kansas State 
University can be consid 
ered You are strongly on 
couraged to contact Michael 
Yops al (785)532-0733 or 
stop by KedzM 1 1 5 tor more 
information about the posi- 
tion Applications may be 
picked up m Kedzte 113 or 
1tS oi online at 
hltp// apub.k*u edu/tectv up 
Bricaljgahtml Please in 
etude your current class 
schedule 

SUMMER HAY hasp Long 
hours Good $H (765)587 
5652 

SLIMMER PART-TIME Aih 
Istlc Training on campus 
ill (8881046-3278 



3101 



Help Wanted 

SUMMER HELP wanted 
part-time or lull lime posi- 
tion Must work Saturday*, 
apply al Bolt's Garden 
Acres 1800 S Scenic Ask 
tot Angw (785)539-1901 

SUMMER INTERNSHIP 
ALTERNATIVE-MOVER 

Covan World-Wide Moving 
is looking lor college stu- 
dents tor summer work Ex- 
cellent opportunity lo stay in 
town lor summer, slay >n 
shape and save some cash 
or 11 you need en internship 
alternative or summer em- 
pioymenl Helpers and 
packers In perform packing 
and loading of household 
good to our military and 
commercial customers No 
CDL required Apply as 
toon as possible at 615 S 
11th Street on Fort Riley 
Btvd Very competitive $7 50 
10 $900 hourly incentive 
wages Job begins immedi 
ately following spnnij nn.ji: 
week Ihrough summer 
Equal Opportunity Employ- 



SUMMER POSITION Look 
ing lot a responsible Individ 
ual lo watch our three cbii 
dren at our home beginning 
June 1 Monday- Friday 
8 30- 5 30 Ages are 4, 8. 
10 References required 
Please caff Kevin at (7S5) 
ft&4 1607 

YOUTH MINISTER. Pari 

time position period lor in- 
dividual or couple to work 
with teen youth as Christian 
mentor and congregation's 
Youth Minister We seek 
someone committed, organ 
i fed and faithful Contact 
Kalhteen Jones, (7851776 
1745 or Peace Lulhetan 
Church, (785)539-7371 



4101 



Hems tor Sale 

GOVERNMENT SUHPLUS 
field gear, boots, camou- 
flage clothing, much motet 
Also Carhartt Workwaar 
Open Monday Friday 
9a m 5 30p m , Saturday 
9a m 4p m SI Mn^ 
plus Sales SI Mary'i. KS 
(/Wj (437 -2734 

KEGORATOR I OR sale 
Si 50, or best offer Can 
Jeff (785)221-1641 

wmma—mm 

Furniture to 
Buy/Sell 

THREE-PERSON SOFA 
Good condition $50 or best 
offer Call (7851341 5676 

TWIN MATTRESS lor sale 
with matching bed fhWM 
and dresser Call (785)317- 
2232 

4351 



Computers 

COMPUTERS REPAIRED 
and data saved Viruses and 
spyweb removed to en- 
hance speed and reHabikty 
Fast and reliable service 
Call Lair Gauche. 1123 
Wesltoop, (785)776-3302 



A Saturday llniku 

I hop i ill h i 

t .imrmlei rqwed tin- 

I'or celebration 

I uif l.nuihc iti WcMliHip 
Manfuluui. 785-776- JJ02 




The Collegian cannot veri- 
fy the financial potential of 
advertisements In the Em- 
ployment/Career classifi- 
cation Readers srs ad- 
vised to approach any 
such business opportuni- 
ty with reasonable cau- 
tion. The Collegian urges 
out readers to contact the 
Better Business Bureau. 
601 SE Jefferson. Topeka. 
KS 66607-1190 (785)232 




AlJlOfTWOrtW 

$S00t POLICE IMPOUNDS! 

Hondas/ Chevies/ Jeeps 
etc Cars/ Trucks/ SUV* 
from $500t For listings and 
information call 1600)366 
0124 ext 7536 

1997 DODGE Ram 1500. 
1 1 1.000 miles, tow package 
quad 1Mb $6000 (316)644 
5040 



PSaa 



aha Radian GOO. 
beet offer Runs 
J564.39S0 



2003 HONDA 400 EX 
$3500 or best offer 

(785)456-3416 

NEW HETRO scooter. 49cc, 
tour- stroke, 140 mpg. grey 
and Mack, free campus 
parking m bike racks. $800 
(765>S»-97g2 



$tOt POLICE SEIZED prop- 
arty TVs. PCs, DVD Play- 
ers, and more from $101 For 
more information (600)366- 
0307 ext M670 







* 



Page 12 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Thursday, May 5, 2005 



HOUSEBOY | Position open to any males of campus 



Continued from Page 1 

storage and other food lips 
from the cook" 

The male students heard 
about the openings in the 
house through the women of a 
certain house or through 
friends. 

"One of my brothers did not 
have time to be a houseboy and 
vice president," Tony Cinelli, 
sophomore in psychology, said. 
"Thai's when [ called Kappa 
Delta and applied for the job" 

Some houses required an 
application and an interview 
but many just required an in- 
terview with the house mom, 
the cook and in some cases a 
house board 

"They looked for the kind of 
things 1 have done before and 
what 1 am involved in," Cinelli 
said. "They also looked at my 
schedule and saw if it fit with 
when they needed someone 
and told me what to expect if I 
was hired" 

Houseboy positions are 
open to any male on campus. 

Within the structure of the 
houseboy system there is nor- 
mally one man who oversees 
the others. This honor goes to 
the member who has worked 
for the house the longest, 
Wilbur said. 



This also determined the 
payment of the workers Time 
equals money; seniority and 
terms of service received more 
than regular time spent helping 
around the house They also 
get paid by the hour every two 
weeks, Russell Giesen, junior 
in horticulture, said. 

"Even though the name 
houseboy or sorority slave has 
a bad connotation, we were 
able to make relationships with 
the girls and have fun on the 
job" Cinelli said 

"On chapter nights one of 
the guys would write 'you win' 
on one of the napkins and de- 
liver it with the salads," Giesen 
said. "After dinner was over the 
girl would bring the napkin 
into the kitchen and get a 
cookie." 

Other events that go on be- 
hind the kitchen door are 
things like roll dodgeball, 
roughhousing and the tradi- 
tional chapter walkout. 

"Every semester the house- 
boys stage a walkout," Wilbur 
said, "They set everything up 
and start to serve us but then 
drop everything they are doing 
and leave us with the dishes. 
It's like a payback and a night 
off of work," 

However, not everything al- 
ways goes well and lack of 



"Even though the 
name houseboy 
or sorority slave 

has a bad conno- 
tation, we were 
able to make 

relationships with 

the girls and have 
fun on the job." 

tony Qmm 
SOPHOMORE IN PSVt HOt OGY 



communication can pose as a 
problem among the cook, 
house mom, the girls and the 
houseboy, Giesen said. 

At the end of each semester 
the houseboys are asked to 
continue working and forming 
relations within the house. If 
they decide to come back, pay 
is usually increased because of 
service time and the fact they 
know what is expected of 
them. 

"We really get along with 
our houseboys," Wilbur said 
"It's pretty fun and they are 
great guys. They also enjoy 
what they do and we enjoy 
working with them." 



RELIEF I Federal assistance after storm sets record 



Continued from Page 1 

"That's a real thing we see 
here in the Midwest - the will- 
ingness of friends and neigh- 
bors to come and help," Krase 
said "We always like to en- 
courage that " 

The previous record was set 



in 2002, when federal assis- 
tance from another ice storm 
totaled $46 million. That 
storm also hit southern 
Kansas. 

"There are some (utilities) 
that are still trying to finish 
their repairs" from that storm, 
Nelson said. "It's been several 



years, but it was massive." 

It could take several years 
for utilities to recover from the 
latest storm, he said. 

"These things all require a 
lot of planning and engineer- 
ing" Nelson said. "It's like 
building a bridge. They're very 
complex" 




btolecollegion.com 



aniBEEff 



Talk with one of our sales 
representatives by calling.., 

532-6560 



V l> \ I It I I M \ <■ 



BUILDING I Child care center in need of funds 



Continued from Page I 

couldn't add on a room We 
couldn't tear out the walls" 

Ring said remodeling would 
require a permit and the build- 
ing would have to follow the 
current licensing regulations. 
However, she said if no remod- 
eling is done, the center is only 
required to follow the regula- 
tions that were in place when 
the building was constructed. 

Current licensing regula- 
tions require that all preschool 
ers be on the ground floor of a 
child care facility, which would 
present a problem with the cen- 
ter's current design 

Plans for a new child devel- 
opment center began when the 
$100 million Jardine Redevel- 
opment Project called for the 
demolition of the center A task 
force was then created to re- 
search what would be needed 
in a child care facility and ex- 
amined centers at other Big 12 
schools. 

However, the Jardine Rede- 
velopment Project final plans 
did not call for the demolition 



of the building the center is in, 
Reagan said. 

Reagan said the facility is 
now going to receive minor 
renovations including a new 
roof to make it safe for chil- 
dren. 

" M ost people are happy 
with the child care center, and 
it's not the burning issue that it 
has been," he said. 

While a small changes may 
help for now. Ring said a new 
center is needed soon Without 
help from students, raising 
money for a new building may 
take up to five years. 

"It would be almost impossi- 
ble to stay in that building for 
five more years without closing 
down and having major reno- 
vations," she said. "I don't think 
that waiting five years and clos- 
ing down is an answer" 

Erik Ankrom, former stu- 
dent body vice president, 
served on the task force and 
said although a new center is 
needed, it will take some time 
to get students to accept the 
idea. 

"It would take a group to 



promote it and bring it in front 
of the students," he said. 

Although Ankrom said, he 
couldn't see anything happen- 
ing with student funding within 
the next year, it is not the only 
way to get funding. 

"There may still be a possi- 
bility that other avenues Kke 
private donations are possible," 
he said. 

Ring said she would like stu 
dents to open their minds to 
the possibility of funding the 
center even though it would be 
an expense. 

"A lot of things that these 
student fees go to don't really 
make a difference in people's 
lives," she said. "1 think that 
there will be a lot of students 
that aren't really thinking about 
the possibility of having chil- 
dren If they don't have chil- 
dren and if they don't have 
friends that have children they 
probably don't see how big of a 
need this is, and they would 
probably vole no 

"I think that if students real- 
ly understood they would be 
behind it." 



INFANT | Vacancies in child care facilities limited 



Continued from Page 1 

lists at different places providing 
child care 

"We're having more and 
more parents calling," she said. 

Riley County is not the only 
county that needs more infant 
care, Peschel said. The agency 
provides service to Geary, Wash 
ington, Nemaha, Clay and Mar- 
shall counties, and all need more 
care. 

Oebra Ring, director of the 
KSU Child Development Cen- 
ter, said part of the reason infant 
care is difficult to find is the cost 
to provide it 

Centers require one qualified 
person for three infants, and two 
adults can watch eight infants if 
the room is big enough. Eight is 
the maximum number, though 

"It's very expensive," Ring 
said. "If we have infants, we 
won't make money" 

Toddlers require two adults 
for 10 children, and two adults 
are needed for 20 or fewer 



Did you know? 

Child care in Riley County Centers 

Cj parity 

Otollmonths H 

12 to 17 months 38 

IS to 29 month 64 

30 months to Kindergarten 369 

Kindergarten and above 769 

Family child are 

to 17 months ISO 

1 8 months to Kindergarten 320 
Kindergarten and above 157 



Vacancies 

2 
4 
29 
4 



16 
64 



preschool students, she said 
These numbers are the maxi 
mum, and arc only allowed if the 
room is big enough 

"The more infants they have, 
the less total capacity the center 
can hold," Ring said 

The KSU center doesn't offer 
infant care. The youngest age it 
has is one year old. She said the 
center is looking at grants for 
funding to provide the care 

Ring said the center is look- 



ing to add infant care by remod- 
eling a room. When a new cen- 
ter is built, there will be at least 
three rooms 

The center gets calls asking 
about infant care, she said. 

"We get all kinds of stories, 
and it just makes me feel so bad 
We just feel helpless, because we 
don't know what to tell them." 
Ring said. "If we had 50 infant 
slots, we would fill them with the 
number of people calling" 




We are sending out the 2006-2006 Faculty/Staff Parking Permit 

oppHcattons via e-mail. You should receive an e-mail that wW allow 

you to AH out your form and then print and return It to Parking 

Services. An actual signature Is rTKindatory. 

If you do not receive this e-mail, please look at our web site, 

tau.€K&/porMna and under forms, fill out the 2005-2006 Faculty/Staff 

Parking Permit application, After you sign the form, please return 

via campus mail to Parking Services, 

You may use your new permit as soon as you receive It. Please 
destroy your old permit after displaying your new one. 

Your permits will be sent to your campus address after Jury 1, 2006. If 

you have returned the applteatton 2 weeks or more ahead of July 

31. 2006, you wW receive your new permit before you present permit 

has expired. If you have any questions, please contact 

Parking Services at 532-7275. 




Wed May 4 - Sat May 7 

9:00am - 9:00pm 

Sunday May 8 

11:00am - 7:00pm 

Mori May 9 -Frl May 13 

9:00am - 9:00pm 

539-0511 

www.shopvarneys.com 



mm 



^ ^^ 



/^M( A N S A S STATE 

Collegian 



www lisUU'n lilt-guru ■ >m 



INSIDE 

Ifltn Sub Exp Date •-/- 

CitV Kansas State Historical Society 

j Newspaper Sechon 
and PO Box 3565 

TOpeka KS 66601 
Sports. 



Friday, May 6, 2005 




v<>l 109, No 



Friends 

■ 

remember 

Kemp at 

graduation 



By Sarah Rice 

KANttJMAIKMlfGIAN 

Ali Kemp probably would have grad- 
uated next week 

Instead, her family and friends have 
Kemp only in their memories. The man 
accused of her murder. Benjamin Apple- 
by, 29, appeared in court Tuesday, where 
detectives told the details of how he 
beat, strangled and attempted to rape 
her. 

The details of that day in June 2002 
have finally been released 

Marti Prieb. senior in business mar- 
keting, said the court proceedings have 
opened up a whole new chapter in her 
grieving process. 

"We actually heard it on the news, 
and we didn't know how graphic it was 
going to be. We felt like we owed it to 
her to know exactly what happened," 
Prieb said 

Appleby, who was arrested last No- 
vember in Connecticut, told detectives 
he had stopped at the Leawood, Kan , 
pool where Kemp was working to in- 
quire about a job He said he thought 
Kemp was attractive and decided to "hit 
on her." She was in the pump room 
when Appleby grabbed her, and she 
pushed and tried to hit him He said he 
punched her, then strangled her and at 
tempted to rape her, but was unable to 

Roger Kemp, Ali Kemp's father, 

SwKMrfegtlJ 



Bramlage 
prepares for 
ceremonies 



By Mitt Gorn«y 
KANSAS STATE COtLfGIAN 

Getting ready for graduation can be 
stressful on the students finishing their 
collegiate careers However, it is alsn a 
time the university gets ready to host the 
parents, grandparents and other family 
members of those celebrating com- 
mencement. 

Bramlage Coliseum is hosting seven 
of the 10 commencement ceremonies 
this year |im Muller, manager of opera- 
tions for K State athletics, said the cere- 
monies are some of the most important 
things that happen at Bramlage all year 

"Basically in preparation for com- 
mencement we go through and change 
the facility to commencement setup," 
Muller said "Usually, it's a two-day 
process We go through and we really 
prepare the facility for what we view as 
the ultimate university event ' 

Muller said one of the biggest aspects 
in getting ready is removing the basket 
ball court About 20 people will help 
transform Bramlage to the graduation 
setup 

; "It will take us in the area of about 
eight hours to remove the basketball 
court," he said. "We set up about 800 
chairs on the main floor area." 

Bramlage will host the ceremony for 
the Graduate School on Friday night 
with a reception on the concourse The 
College of Arts and Sciences is the first 
group to graduate on May 13 and is the 
largest of the ceremonies. 

"We've developed a very smooth 

SeeGMKMTWNPaoHi 



Moving on 




CM* Hanewfnchtt | COIL EGIAN 
Amy Sdiurtz, senior in public health nutrition, and her fUnci Jack Bauer, senior in electrical engjiwering, take a ore A 
from their homework Tuesday evrninq in his room it the Detta Chi Fraternity 




Joshrn Brawn | coi tlOtt* 
Enjoying the company of her sorority sisters, Ashley Brewer, junior in geography sotUJIies before working on a project 
inside Slqma Kappa. 




Catrlns Rawton | COtlrWAN 
Jtal Redmond, senior In English and theater, works on sending out last minute senior graduation invitations 
Wednesday evening, Redmond plans on sending out more than 60 Invitations for her graduation for neit Saturday's 
graduation. 



Students prepare for graduation, 
moving out, learn to say goodbye 



By Sarah Rice 

KANSAS SIAIftOtlECJAN 

foni Redmond knows it's time 
to move on, but that doesn't 
make it any easier to say good- 
bye 

Redmond will graduate next 
week with degrees in theater and 
English. 

"I love Manhattan desperate- 
ly, and I feel like I have had such 
a great college experience, and I 
know I am going to miss it so 
much," she said, "Of course at the 
same time, there is a time to 
move on " 

She hasn't been thinking 
about leaving, though, being so 
busy with finals and preparing 
for graduation. 

"I am pretty much trying to 
not think about saying goodbye 
right now," Redmond said "I feel 
like I can't think about anything 
but school and taking tests. I am 
prolonging thinking about it until 
graduation and after graduation" 

She won't miss the tests or all 
the homework, but Redmond 
said she will miss having her 
friends around her 

"Having all my best friends 
just around the corner," she said 
of what she would miss most. 
"Never having to worry about a 
DD because I live half a block 
from the bars and so do most of 
my friends" 

Redmond is hoping for an in- 
ternship in South America teach- 
ing English But, she will gradu- 
ate not knowing what will 
happen next 

She said she is ready for the 
real world because she's already 
been living in it. 

"1 am of the opinion that 1 
have already been in the real 
world 1 know I am a student, 
and I keep getting this real world 
thing thrown at me," she said. "I 
think 1 have always lived in the 
real world" 

Redmond can't pick out just 
one lesson she's learned in col- 
lege, but it's been a overwhelm- 
ing experience. 

"It's hard for me to draw one 
or two lessons," she said "It's all 
encompassing My world has 
changed" 

READY FOR THE NEXT STEP 

Amy Schultz is ready to leave 
and start the rest of her life. 

She'll graduate in May 2006 
.but is leaving K-State for a year- 
long internship for her dietitics 
degree 

"It's been such a busy semes 
ler that right now I am relieved," 
Schultz said. "1 know once 1 look 
back I am going to miss it I spent 
four years of my life here. I am at 
this point of my life when 1 am 
ready to move on away from the 
college scene and start my life " 

Schultz and her fiance, lack 
Bauer, will be getting married 
Oct. 29 in Kansas City. Bauer 



will graduate in electrical engi- 
neering in August 

"I won't miss having to come 
home at night and study," Schultz 
said "Once I start my job, I leave 
from work and I am done with 
things and can come home and 
relax." 

Bauer couldn't think of any- 
thing he will miss about K-State 
yet, but Schultz said it will be her 
friends that she misses the most 

"I lived in the sorority for a 
year and the dorms for two 
years," she said "Being able to 
come home and talk to your 
friends and unwind Those nights 
when you watch movies together, 
and something I won't get to do 
when I am away from here " 

It's the same lor David Potter 
who will be graduating after five 
years at K State He'll miss the 
friends and foolball games, but 
he's ready to be done. 

Potter will be getting married 
June 1 1 and beginning a job in 
Olathe His fiancee, Julie, is 
teaching second grade in Topeka. 

"It's kind of stressful," he said 
"Everything's coming at me at 
once It's back to back to back 
You have to find a job after grad 
uation and an apartment Then 
all of a sudden I am getting mar- 
ried, so I'll have another person 
living with me that I am not used 
to" 

BITTERSWEET MOVE 

Ashley Brewer is just moving 
across town but she is saying 
goodbye to life in Sigma Kappa 
sorority to move into a house 
She won't miss sharing a bath- 
room with 12 other girls, which 
she has done for the past two 
.,, but Brewer said il will be 
hard adjusting to living without 
all her best friends down the hall. 

"I was at first excited because 
it's a big deal, but the closer it 
gels, the more I am kind of 
weepy about it," she said 

Brewer and her roommates 
plan to attend Wednesday night 
dinners at the house to keep in 
touch with their sisters 

"We all kind of want to come 
over and have dinner other 
nights of the week and see peo- 
ple," she said. 

"We will do our laundry here 
because it gives you time to sit 
and interact." 

The reality of the move, Brew- 
er said, will not hit her this week 
but instead it will hit her during 
recruitment week in the fall. 

it will probably just be really 
hectic, and everyone will be mov- 
ing home or out," she said. "For 
the most part, it won't be a real 
goodbye, 

"When we come back for re- 
cruitment, everyone stays the 
night here, and I have to go 
home That will be sad There is 
so much bonding that goes on, 
and 1 am worried about missing 
out." 



Bums to keep online teacher evaluations, tuition as priorities during term 



By Joanna Rubkfc 

KANSAS swrtanuuw 

Online teacher evaluations and 
long-term tuition plans are top priorities 
for Student Body President Michael 
Bums. 

Bums said he and Vice President 
Grant Grocne are working on a propos 
al that will go before Faculty Seriate this 
summer to get feedback from members. 

The teacher evaluations are going to 



be featured on the Wildcat Information 
System, which was launched this se- 
mester 

Bums said students will be able to 
critique instructor's teaching styles 
among other aspects of the class. 

"It's going to incorporate pieces that 
will allow students to make decisions 
about teachers and classes," he said. 

Bums and Groene will research a 
contracted tuition plan and other long- 
term tuition plans 



The contracted tuition plan was part 
of the pair's campaign platform The 
plan is when students enroll, they 
would continue paying the same 
amount of tuition while at K-State 

Burns said he and Groene wiil look 
at other options besides the contracted 
tuition plan, though 

Bums will form a task force to look 
at the issue at administration request 

"We're going to do some of the pre 
I research this summer, so we're 



ready for the task force to take a took at 
all the options," Bums said. 

Bums said Student Senate Chair 
lyson Moore, Vice Chair Emily Besler, 
Groene and he will be on campus this 
summer 

"Our major goal this summer is to 
get all of the preliminary work going," 
he said 

"I'm just looking forward to a sum- 
mer we're we can get a lot of work 
done" 



Today 




High 79 
Low 62 



Saturday 



* 



High 84 

Low 60 



NEWS HIGHLIGHTS 



Grenades in New York 

Two makeshift grenade* exploded 
outside i building housing the British 
(emulate early Thursday, Election 
Day In Britain, taming slight damage 
but no injuria, ottkuh said. A United 
Nations analyst found loitering 
nearby was being questioned, 
authorities said 



20 more killed in Iraq 

Insurgents killed at least 20 people in 
three separate attacks targeting Iraqi 
security fortes In Baghdad on 
Thursday, including one by a man 
who Mew himself up while wilting 
m few outside an army reautoneftt 
center, ponce said A simitar attack 
Wednesday killed 60 Iraqis 



Precious Doe identified 

Four yean after a little gttfs headless 
body was found, police identified an 
Oklahoma woman as her mother and 
charged her Thursday in the murder 
of the child now known as Precious 
Doe Polite said It was the girl's 
stepfather who actually killed her 
with a kick to the head 



DON'T FORGET 



Today is the last day af 
Coaleqtin puWkatton 
for the spring 2005 
semester Check each 
Wednesday during the 
summer semester to get 
youtnews. 



-Caddyshad* plays at 
S tonight in Forum Hall, 
Saturday at 7 and 9:10 
p.m. and Sunday at S p.m, 
Admission h Si each 
night 







m m ■ mmm 



Page 2 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Friday, May 6, 2005 




Puzzles I Eugene Sheffer 



ACROSS 

1 Dtoi soda 

IWM 
* Assist 

ance 
8 Hllcher s 

tn^u 

II" Gala 
Saeret" 

1 3 Cupid's 
ken 

14 Valhalla 
VIP 

15 i3in 
prosidotit 

17 Sweet 
potatoes 

18 Lens 
sellings 

19 Verity 

nor tores 
21 Embol- 
ic hmenl 

20 Actress 
Carson 

29 Enjoy- 

IV. >r,| 

30 Kimono 
OfMtl 

31 Edward 
Jones 
Deem 

learn 

32 Towal 
Oosig na- 
tion 

33 -What) ol 
Fortune* 
option 

34 Singer 

ranco 



35 Pcli-.h 

36 Thora» 

37 Tends r- 
loiri, a g 

39 -Caught 
nf* 

40 Honesi 
politician 

41 Maternity- 
want 
daia 

45 Radar 
spot 

44 Gas- 
station 
(•quest 

50 PhMMn's 
cohort 

51 Second 
hand 

52 Whitney 
or 
Wallach 

53 The 
gamut 

54 Traditional 
tales 

55 Nosh 



DOWN 

1 Lovers' 

quarrel 

2 Budget 
nval 

3 Region 

4 impede 

5 "Ms — 
Unusual 
Day" 

6 Neither 
partner 

7 Whom 
Zola 
supported 

Befitting a 
sovereign 

9McKm- 
ley's 
first tody 

10 Lower the 
lights 

11 Navy rank 
(abbf.J 

16 is enam- 
ored ot 

20 German 
article 



23 Bound 
along 

24 Wading 
bird 

25 A couple 
Of cups 

28 Seles 
competitor 

27 Hindu 
princess 

28 Artist 
Nolde 

29 Predica 
morn 

32 Odious 

33 Don't be 
greedy 

35 Symbol ol 
intrigue 

38"- 
Harokt's 
Pilgrim- 
age* 

38 Bolivian 
city 

39 More 



Solution time: 25 mint. 



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42 Geneal- 
ogy chart 

43 Poly 
nesian 
entertain- 
ment 

44 Skewer 

45 Shape 
shifter? 

46 Reading 
course, 
lor short 

47 Bli-news 
abbr 

49 Equi- 



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H ' D ElO RNGI HW II Ul 

DIO OOHR E1H CBZLOTM 

PULE T P S M Z 1 W L G I . Z N O 

RBI S L 1 R QR EC I' 2 1 T T 

Yesterday's i'rvpioqutp: J HAT NEW 
k A! i IS HXJ GOOD-NATURED I DONT 

is.l KS 1 AND WHAT HE SEES IN PEOPLE 

Today's Crjplriquip Clue: Lf equal* V 



CRYPTOQW BOOK It Sum] M.50 (diadem o.) to"" 
OyptodasOca Book 1. PO. Bw 536475. Orlando. FL 32893-8478 



Th» CryptoqiKp » a autiasaAan csphw in tvhch one MMt iranostoi 
•rot* M you funk in* X •que*) O. 4 *i equat O throughout the 



gta you ckjea to locaUng wowW SafcAan • by KM ana trior 
O 2005 bv King FMlurM Syndcata Inc 



BEST BETS 

5 things to do before the end of the semester 



1 1 PARTY ON 



This is the last weekend before finals. 
This is the last chance to get crazy, 
before the final push into summer. 
Several students will be leaving to go 
home after finals, so this fs the last 
weekend to enjoy Manhattan. Here 
are some suggested Ideas for last 
minute memories: enjoy the outdoors 
{I.e. Plllsbury Crossing, Konza Prairie, 
etc), drink as much booze as possible. 
streak throughout your favorite parts 
of Manhattan or take a nap. 




The blotter | Arrests in Riley County 




2 1 LAST CHANCE 



You now know you should study and 
attend class on a daily basis. If this 
sounds like you, put on a pot of 
coffee and gel to studying, unless 
you want to get sent home next 
semester Go to the library or lock 
yourself in your room and have your 
roommates hide your beet bong, 
because you need to put your nose to 
the grindstone. 



3| 



Go to your finals lt/s that easy — they're next week 
for those of you who haven't been paying attention. 





4 1 EXTRA CASH 



Be sure to sell back your books or find 
some sort of use for them like using it as a 
doorstop, propping up your coffee table or 
collecting dust on your shelf, for those of 
you who are ambitious, go ahead and 
purchase books for next fall and read 
them over the summer. OK, stop 
laughing,,. 



5 1 SPRING CLEANING 



For those of you who are leaving your 
bouse oi apartment in a week or two, if s 
time to dear out your fridge The best 
way to do this is a "Cleaning out the 
fridge" party, where you eat everything 
in your fridge. If you still have no idea 
what you're reading, go to bed. 




Reports are taken directly from Riley 
County Police Departments daily logs. 

Wednesday, May 4 

■ At 9:4$ a.m., Queeneth fvurunobi, 

I SOS Oxford Place, No. 25, was arrested 
for driving on a suspended license. Bond 
was set at $750. 

■ At 10 a.m., Melinda Weeden, Ogden, 
Kan., was arrested for failure to appear. 
Bond was set at $500. 

■ At 10:40 a.m., Edgar Oamron, Olsburg, 
Kan., was arrested for driving on a 
suspended license and habitual viola- 
tions. Bond was set at $5,000. 

■ At 12:39 p.m., James tusk Jr., Junction 
City, Kan., was arrested for failure to 
appear Ho bond was set. 

At 2:54 p,m., Kirkland Boe, Topeka, was 
arrested for failure to appear Bond was 
set at $500 

■ At 3:50 pin., Felicia Brown, fort Riley, 
was arrested for worthless check. Bond 
was set at 545964 

■ At 4:50 p.m., Chadwkk ChebulU, 225 
Ridge Olive, was arrested for criminal 
damage to property and witness intimi- 
dation. No bond was set 

■ At 559 p.m., Grovei Page IV, Kansas 



City, Kan., was arrested for failure to 
appear Bond was set at $500. 

■ At 6:25 p m., Michele Mathews, Fort 
Worth, Texas, was arrested for theft, 
forgery and identity theft Bond was set 
at $50,000. 

■ At 8 p.m., Lynn King Jr., 2101 Sloan St . 
No. 2, was arrested for battery. No bond 
was set. 

■ At 8:20 p.m . Brynn Stewart 2102 
Sloan St., No 2, was arrested for battery. 
Bond was set at $500. 

Thursday, May 5 

■ At 12: 10 d.m , Joey Blackburn, 820 Fair 
Lane, was arrested for criminal 
trespassing. Bond was set at $750. 

■ At 2 a.m., Ashley Shanks, Junction City, 
was arrested for disorderly conduct Bond 
was set at $750 

■ At 2:25 a.m., Sarah Downing, 1917 
Casement Road, was arrested for DUI. 
Bond was set at $750. 

■ At 2.30 am, Keith Watson, Fort Riley, 
was arrested for disorderly conduct. Bond 
was set at $750 

■ At 2:30 a.m., Tyree Wells, Fort Riley, 
was arrested for disorderly conduct. Bond 
was set at $750. 



The planner | Campus bulletin board 



Campus Calendar is the Collegian's 
campus bufleUn board service. To place 
an item in the Campus Calendar, stop by 
Kedzie 1 16 and fill out a form or e mail 
the news editor at 

butlft«n»i^pub,kiu.edu by 1 1 a.m. two 
days before It Is to run. 

■ lb* Graduate School announces the 
final oral defense of the doctoral dtsserta - 
tton of fiufcharin Limsupavankh at 10 am 
today in Weber 121. 

■ The Graduate School announces the 
final oral defense of the doctoral disserta 
tton of John Jacobs at 1 pm today in 
Seated 164 

■ The Graduate School announces rhe 
final oral defense of the doctoral disserta- 
tion of Howard Camp at 1 :30 p.m. today in 
fjrriwefl 145, 

■ The Graduate School announces the 
final oral defense of the doctoral disserta- 
tion of Gabriel Cook at 4 pm today in 
ChemistiyBwchemst^ twitting, room 
437. 

■ The Graduate School announces the 
final oral defense of the doctoral dtsserta 



tion of Liubo Oven at 8:30 a.m Monday in 
Nichols 236 

■ The Graduate School announces the 
final oral defense of the doctoral dtsserta 
Iran of Katya Karathanos at 2 p.m. Monday 
in Bluemont 106. 

■ The Graduate School announces the 
final oral defense of the doctoral dtsserta 
Hon of Mkhael May at 9 am. Tuesday in 
Eisenhower 201 

■ The Graduate School announces the 
final oral defense of the doctoral disserta- 
tion of Dan Johnson at 1 1 am. Tuesday in 
Bluemont 34 ID 

■ The Graduate School announces the 
final oral defense of the doctoral dtsserta 
tion of Heath Marts at 1 pmTuesdaytn 
Bluemont 368 

■ The Graduate School announces the 
final oral defense of the doctoral disserta- 
tion of Sarnpyo Hong at 1 :30 pm. Tuesday 
inCardwetl220 

■ The Graduate School announces the 
final oral defense of the doctoral disserta- 
tion of John Ketghley at 3 30 pm. Tuesday 
in Bluemont 108 



Corrections and clarifications 

Corrections and clarification', appeal in this space If you see something that should be 
corrected, call News Fdrtor Kristi Hurla at 532-6556 or email (olkQianrnpubku/rdu, 



Kansas State Collegian 

(USPS 291 020} The Kansas State Collegian, a student newspaper at Kansas State 
University, is published by Student Publications Inc., Kedzie 103, Manhattan, KS 66506 
The Collegian is published weekdays during the school year and on Wednesdays during 
the summer Periodical postage is paid at Manhattan, KS 66502 POSTMASTER: Send 
address changes to Kansas State Collegian, circulation desk, Kedzie 103, Manhattan, KS 
66506-7167 

O Kansas State Collegian, 2005 




ra LARGE 

Hill * "" | '» , ' |- > »"■'' 

WW I ..<-r. Ihtltlnh 

ALL 
DAY, 



n.'rfi u,-.ii,., T • ;vi nil 





Car 

Summer Special • 




Parking 

Lot Construction 

Parking Lot construction will occur in lot C-2, 
north of the Recreation Complex, starting In May. 

This lot, encompassing alt parking between 

Denlson Ave. on the east and the traffic circle on 

the West, will require alternate entry and parking 

over the course of the summer. 

Please watch for more notices, check with the 

staff at Parking Services or the Recreation Center 

and follow signs and directions. 

We appreciate your patience during this period, 



git! certificates available 



1 537-1496 



,. _ i 



CARY COMPANY. 



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**a^»» 






Friday, May 6, 2005 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 3 



State of Kansas steps into limelight with breaking news 



q 

[hi 



By Amy Proton 

KANSAS mifCOUfOAN 

Big news stories broke in 
Kansas this semester, giving the 
slate much media attention The 
Collegian takes a look at some of 
the top stories that made head- 
lines this spring, 

1 . BTK SUSPECT ARRESTED 
FEB. 26,2005 

Wichita residents awoke lo 
quite an announcement the 
morning of Feb 26 After nearly 
three decades of living in fear, Wi- 

chiia police ar- 
rested the man 
they believed 
was the BTK 

s.-iidl killer 

Dennis Radar, 

60, of Park 

City. Kan., a 

small town just 

outside of Wi 

chita, was ar- Rader 

rested in con 

diction of eight murders between 

1974 and I486 in Wichita and 

two more murders years later in 

Park City. 

1 In- arrest caused many Wi- 
c hi tans and Kan sans alike a 
weekend hill of emotions and 
memories of the serial killer. 

"I think it provided a lot of re- 
lief fur a hit people in Wichita." 
said Ryan Spohn, assistant pro- 
fessor in sociology. "When he 
came back into the limelight, a lot 
of old fears were awakened" 

BTK, which stands for "bind, 
torture and kill." resurfaced near- 
ly a year be lure the arrest of 
I id it after objects from various 
crime scenes were sent to local 
news media Spohn said BTK s 
ii i terest of remaining in the public 

it-ems very unusual. 

The publicity or external 
recognition isn't what usually dri- 
ves a serial killer It's generally 
more about, an inner drive or 
inner need,' Spohn said. "(BTK) 
often Iried GO put Inmsi-lf in the 
limehght" 

What tnay have been the most 
intriguing aspect of the BTK ar- 
rest, though, was Rader's some 
what "normal" appearance, 
nam ely h rs d 1 1 1 i rmer Boy 

Scout leader and his heavy in 
volvement in church activities, 

"The most interesting thing of 
(he case is the fact that he was 
just an average- looking person," 

■tin said "It was kind of a 
shock, because he wasn't some 
crazy lunatic person, sort of an 
everyday Joe" 

Rader's case made it to court 
earlier this week in Wichita, 
where his innocent plea was en- 
tered earlier, although prosecu- 
tors say there will not be a plea 
bargain for him District Court 
judge Gregory Walter set a trial 



Chrl* Hanawlntkal | (01 KUAN 
ClotulFlyer pilot Stmt lw»*tt tritbtltes with Virgin Atlantic founder Sir Rkttard Brjnwin 
Thursday afternoon after landing. Fouttt broke numerous records during his trip around the 
world. Fossett created a retort for tne first solo, non-stop flight wound the world. 



date for June 27, which will most 
likely be postponed. 

2. THOMAS MURRAY 
CONVICTED OF MURDER 
MARCH 17, 2005 

Two days before K- State stu- 
dents and faculty took off for 
spring break, news broke that for 
mcr English professor Thomas 
Murray was found guilty of mur- 
dering his ex -wife, Carmin Ross 
Murray was charged with stab- 
bing Ross in her home in 
Lawrence on Nov 13, 2003 

Selected students from Mur- 
ray's classes testified throughout 
the trial process, which lasted 18 
hours over a four -day period. 
Once the verdict was made, 
K-Stiite immediately terminated 
his employment and Murray was 
taken off the payroll, creating a 
problem for students and faculty 
alike 

it presented us with an imme- 
diate staffing problem," said 
Linda Brigham, head of the De- 
partment of English "We had stu 
dents in Dr. Murray's classes that 
needed to finish the course, and 
we had no lime to go and search 
for a linguist with the same quali- 
fications" 

Murray had been suspended 
with pay since he was arrested in 
connection with the murder in 
October 2004 Currently, Murray 
and Ross's 6-year-old daughter, 
Clara Ross- Murray, is living with 
Ross's parents. Danny and Judy 
Ross Murray's sentencing date is 
set for at 1:30 p m today in Dou- 
glas County District Court He 
faces life in prison with the possi- 
bility i il parole after 25 years 

3. GLOBALF LYER PILOT 
SETS RECORD 
MARCH 3, 2004 

K- State- Sajina received world- 
wide attention in early March 
when Global Flyer Pilot Steve 
Fossetl completed the first solo, 
non-stop flight around the world 
March 3 • 

The 23,000-mile journey took 



67 hours, and was almost a no-go 
when controllers discovered a 
large fuel leak just hours before 
Fossett completed his mission 

Kristin Magettc, coordinator 
of public and alumni relations at 
K State Sal ina, said the Sal in a 
campus had no idea how big of 
an event it actually was when 
Fossett approached the airport 
with his plan in November 2004 

"I don't think that anybody re- 
alized just how tremendous of an 
event it would be, even up until 
the time that it happened," 
Magctte said. "It became bigger 
than any of us dreamed it would 
become" 

As for Fossetl, Magette said his 
next project remains a mystery 

"He is, from what we under 
stand, the sort of person who is 
planning his nexl adventure," she 
said "He said he doesn't really 
like to tell people what's next I'm 
sure he's working on his next big 
adventure but he hasn't shared it 
with anyone yet." 

4. POPE JOHN PAUL It DIES 
APRIL 2,2005 

One week after Easter Sunday, 
millions around the world said 
good-bye to Pope John Paul II, 
who died April 2, after battling 
numerous medical conditions, in 
eluding Parkinson's disease 

For many K- State students, the 
pope's death marked the first 




Mike Voder | ilWUflnf KWRNAI WOHD 
Thomas E. Murray is led out of the Douglas County District Court In Lawrence, Kan., March 1 7 after being found guilty of murtermg his w- 
wife , Carmin D. Ross. Murray, a former K- State professor, was found guilty of first degree murder in the bludgeoning and stabbing death of 
(toss. 40, in November 2001 at her home in lawrence. 



time they would live knowing a 
different leader of Ihe Catholic 
Church. 

"He was Ihe pope for 26 years 
and the only pope they had ever 
known," said Father Keith Weber 
<il St Isidore's Catholic Student 
Center, 

"It made them stop and reflect 
on what role the pope plays on 
their lives When somethings 
changed, it makes you step back 
on the pro< • 

Weber said the pope's death 
also showed many Catholics and 
non -Cat holies alike the process 
(if electing a new pope 

"The media did an excellent 
job of trying tn explain Cailmli 
cism and tryinn to explain the 
process nf how the election 
worked," he said 



Directory 



First Lutheran 

10th & Poynu 537-8532 

Worship 

Sat. 5:30 p.m , Sun. 10 a.m. 

Sunday School all ages 9 45 a.m. 



First Christian 
Church 

(Disi • 
10: 15 a.m. Worship Scrvic 
Neil Eagle, Pii-sli.r. 77h-K7W 

■ h , r»i.inli:il in I i ■ 
Sih ami Humhnldi t'Hinlimiv St|ii.m 



? 






9 K 10:45 AM 




Journey 

Ministry 



limvenit> 
/SOOflatiin ■ J7* VMO 

m T->c« MutJ 

9 4V COAttftipOfatfy V*rvi * 

Ii 00 Hr««Hjtt And Blur Stud* 

Cftfi* H*Kf'fiflfOfi * WWW KiUki Qftj 



Rugged Cross Bop 



T04 '. Marian 
Sunday School 10 am 
Preacftng 1 1 am 



otilMtti&mitarWo 





St. Luke's 
Lutheran 

Church 

3.W Sunset Avenue 

Siilul Juv 

traditional Win ihip r>:in> p.m. 

Sunday- 

I i jiI i i H mal tt . >i ■- 1 1 1 \ i H;.MI ti.ni . 
Bible Mml\ <M5imii. 

whip I I'tMl H.m, 
t'umput IVtlur - i'rit Wuod 
I mail: «'«rii|iu\nin ; " ninlhUlvmiii 
<7K5l M4-MH 



Lutheran 
( anipus 
Ministry 

Ine*iivSiiprer,ftpin 
ai laMher Mouse I74.S Ander-Jiri 

Suml.i) t-vening Worship 

7 p in.. Duiilortli Chupel 

www.kvii.niii/1i m . I, u 

PR Putty Hnmnttarnett 

tnttnm ( umpui l*a\utt 

S39-44SI 
— Open to All — 



Come Worship 
With Us 

tst Church of th*> AJazarane 

9*30 
10 40 









^ 



Episcopal 

Di ocese ol Kansa s 

Campus Ministry 



Sunday worship jl 
St faun tpteopaJ Church 
Six th 8 PoynU, Manhatt an 

II hi « m < ■*ri*iM|«nri ■*-.-*., 



* Tf*«fc> MM* TTttm 



Dtrw yinlng. ITugmm r,anllnatm W I VJ'. 



Cardinal |oseph Ratzin^cr of 
Germany succeeded Pope |ohn 
Paul II April 19 when he was 
elecled as Itipe Benedict XVI 

5. KANSANS PASS GAY 
MARRIAGE AMENDMENT 
APRIL S, 2005 

Kanaam emotions rode high 
this election season as residents 
went lo the polls to vote for a 
constitutional amendment ban- 
ning gay marriage. Residents 
voted in favor of the amendment, 
which held marriage to a unity 
between one man and one 
woman 

As a result. 59 states now have 
laws specifically banning same- 
sex marriage while 16 states have 
constitutional amendments ban 
ning gay marriage 



ADVERTISE 

YOUR 

CHURCH 



The vote drew mixed emo- 
tions among campus, including 
student groups such as Cottage 
Republicans and Ihe Qin 
Straight Alliance. 

Ben Davis, executive of Col 
lege Republicans, said in an April 
! ( nllegian story that he was sure 
the amendment would pass. 

"I'm very happy, and 1 am sua 
that the majority of the stale is 
happy as well," Davis said 

In the same story, U'igh I im 
former president of QSA, said the 
most disappointing aspect "I Ihe 
amendment was that it didn't di- 
rectly affect gay marriage du 
the fact that there is already a 
statute prohibiting il 

"It's unfortunate that the gay 
community was used to deny het 
erosexuai c< mples' rights," he said 



CALL 
^532-6560^ 



St. Isidore's 

Catholic Student 

Center 

MASS SCHEDULE 

Tuesday-Thursday 10 00 p.m. 

Friday 12:10 p.m 

Saturday 5 p.m. 

Sunday 9:10 a.m., 11 am 

Sun. 4:30 p.m., 6 p.m 
Father Keith Weber, Chaplain 

711 Denison 539 -7496 



Bethel African Methodist 
Episcopal Church 

Ml Vunu Srr«r 

Kiln Rim ii ii 

Hcvcfrnil IVnnv I'ilchfnnt 
PfcttM 

\M 
• i \M 



w 



'Imitr Tt WwJMp, tb^itt L Smt" 



J 



Unitarian 
Universal is t (J —*4 
Fellowship l 
of Manhattan 



& 



i. nwvlMlkKt Iclion K IK 1/1 nit) 
- Bulk) .ji nt 4^ j jit ftebpiuui 

; llMfl t favv, -■ It I 

Ihiy fan? Uh h*Uk-r-> 
inmitn)|f i i '^pfrgMHIL 

i i 

i**h HMpn net 




Grace 

Baptist 
Church 

2901 Udaw 1Mb I ofSMOttd 

♦ Sunday ♦ 
Morning Worship 
g:15& 10:45 a.m. 

Bible Ctmm ftl All Ages 't: M am 
hvenmg Sen ue nr Care Cells *» p.m 

776-0424 



.e Lutheran Church 

Worship Sundays 

8:30 jnd I liK) 

Contemp"i,n\ 

Scrvie.: 5:0(1 p m 

Pftstoi Michael Lie 
2500 Kimball 

^i l )-7371 
www peace (o-jiHi.mv! 

t liriM .(, .tiller . .. 
Grow and do forth! 



Faith Evangelical Free Church 

•Worship at 8'00,t0;30, 
10:40, 12:00 

• Sunday School at 915 

• College Cla^s at 10:30 

■ 

1921 Barnes Rd 

776-2066 




First Presbyterian 

a^a^a^a^k^as Church 



9:15 to Worship Service 
9:15 a.m. Sunday School 
10:30 

5:00 p.m, 

6:00 p.m. College Student Dinner 




•caWber, Amoc Paator 
B*v, LC, Met nonet] Pmatot 

801 Le*venworth • 837 0619 



«H«.rirs||>i« Mii.iuliiiiliiri.iiHii 



t 



You are welcome at... 

FIRST ASSEMBLY OF QOD 

"iitllril .1. . i>* ttilltf III lit* f>Mr|l**tt*. . . " 



Sunday 

Fiisi Sarvice 0:45 • <n 

(CnWran't, Youth A Adult Sunday School) 

Second Swvtoa I0 20»m 

(ChHdWi't Cnurcti I AddMonal 

AduM Sunday School) 

Evsning Scvka 6 p.m. 



| 7:00 p.m 
Ybutl Group (iradaa 712) 

t (Boya Ouba) 
> (0*1» CluC*) 
CM Mpha Campua MnWM a 00 p m, 
(LMto Thaalar. K State Umon) 






Nmrnry PnwUM^tar AH Strrirrt 



•j. T'jiiti Weston. P*»stor 
10 Candle wood Ot Manhattawi 

('8'- www i>i,inli.iUiinni) org 



•Ar^ifvoJ 



OPINION 



' ■ 



Page 4 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Friday, May 6, 2005 



TO THE POINT 

Issues still 

persist for 

administration 

So, this is goodbye. 

With another semester behind us, 
there is a sense of completion and 
closure. But, as neatly 
as a university calendar 
is divided into semes- 
ters, the issues we face 
are cyclical and fluid. 

After this semester, 
student leaders and 
administrators need to 
persevere on several 
issues and utilize the 
lessons we've learned 
in the past 15 weeks. 

Students do not 
appreciate it when 
they're told how their 
money will be spent 
The Center for Student Activities may 
someday become a necessity at K State. 

Until then, the university should listen 
to what the students want. 

Students' money should be used to 
improve their educational experiences. 

Tuition is and always will be an impor- 
tant issue. 

Again, listening to students is vital to 
continued success. Administrators 
promised to keep increases under 10 
percent for next year. Keeping that 
promise will be a good start. 

Other options, like contracts and 
tuition waivers, deserve serious consider- 
ation. 

Perhaps the most permanent, visible 
effect of this academic term will be the 
Bosco Clock Tower. Widely considered 
an eyesore, perhaps one day the clock 
tower will be accepted. 

Then again, maybe it won't be. If not, 
we hope the university will heed 
students' wishes. 



point is i 
editorial selected *"d 
debated by the editorial 
board and wirten arret 
a majority opinion is 
formed. ThBivthe 
Collegian's official 
opinion. 

Abblt Adams 
Michael Ajhford 
Johanna Barnas 
Ryan C. Flynn 
Man Girard 
Jamas Hurla 
Kristi Hurla 
JtiM Manning 
Sarah Rice 
Joanna Rubick 
Leann Sullen 
Bill Wall 
Ion i Woolery 



WRITE TO US 

The C ollegian welcomes your letters to the editor They an be 
submitted by e-mail to kttm&pubJtfu.tdu, or In person to 
Kedzie 1 16 Please include your full name, year in school and 
major Letters should be limited to 2M words. All submitted 
letters may be edited for length and dartty 



KANSAS STATE 

: COLLEGIAN 



EIKIMUICMF 



FIX II* 



comoct 



Nuuawmoi 



Qwft 

PMOtrjEorrot 



smTSfiim 



mntM 



UMftKtWW 

msgmnrji hhtw 



INi 



OMMftOTM 



(OKH 



MJUMMUTJ 



ASM Ml 



CONTACT US 

lamas Stato ColteaUn OistirVd ads SU-6SSS 

U4di1t! Hewsroom 532-6556 

MMlu*tM,KSM»2 itewmpub.hu fdu 

Display ads Sll-tM tot*rti*Mim....5lHXS 



Lessons learned 

Former outsider gains new respect for the production of the Collegian 







I started working for the Colle- 
gian because last semester some- 
thing in it upset me 
1 was certain I 
could make a posi- 
tive change. 

I wasn't ticked 
off at one of the 
columnists or 
any perceived JESSE manning 
bias 

It was the line art that made me 
mad. 

During Dead Week last semester, 
1 happened to leaf through a Colle- 
gian and stumble upon some of the 
absolute worst line art I'd ever seen. 
I was convinced that I could do bet- 
ter. 

1 filled out my application that 
night; columnist was my second 
choice. I didn't have to be resigned 
to complaining about the art in the 
Collegian. 1 could do better, and I 
was willing to prove it. 

When I began drawing and writ- 
ing in January, I was the typical Col- 
legian-bashing K- State student For 
the previous seven semesters, I read 
the paper every morning and nit- 
picked about little things. 

A misspelling here, a sentence 
fragment there - the Collegian's 
copy editors must have been blind 

A llamingly liberal column ap- 
peared once in a while, and I was 
ticked at the "overall bias" of the 
paper 

In retrospect, I can admit that 1 
was ignorant 

I have been privileged to not 
only work for the Collegian, but also 
to join the editorial staff and see 
what actually goes into producing 
the paper you're holding 

A few of my friends think I've 
changed. One even accused me of 
being "brainwashed," but I prefer to 
think I've had my eyes opened to a 
process that was unknown to me for 
most of my undergraduate career. 

If you think the Collegian is bi- 
ased, you're delusional Don't be of- 
fended - 1 was delusional once, too. 
The only time you'll see any pur- 
poseful bias is on the opinion page, 
either in the editorials or the colum- 
nists' opinion pieces. 

The Collegian's writers work tire- 
lessly on stories ranging from mur- 
der trials to garage sales Many put 
their hearts and souls into the paper, 
sacrificing time they could be spend- 
ing in class or with family and 
friends. 

On a crude level, it's easy to see 
why the paper can be perceived as 



biased. An article may not affect the 
readers one way or the other for 
several paragraphs, but then they 
read that one sentence that robs 
lb em the wrong way. Suddenly, the 
Collegian is biased against their 
point-of-view. 

Here's a simplified example: an 
article on the President that in- 
cludes pros and cons makes both 
sides mad. Conservatives are mad 
because the cons were included 
Liberals think the pros should 
have been left out Bias is in the 
eye of the beholder. 

Since being a Colle- 
gian desk editor, I've 
heard more com- 
plaints than ever 
about our supposed 
bias, mishandled 
facts and copy 
editing errors. 
Here's my chal- 
lenge to all those 
dissatisfied with (he 
paper: apply to 
work for us and 
show us you can do 
better 

It's easy to sit back 
and complain, but 
then you're no better than 
the protester in the street 
holding a sign and shouting but 
essentially doing nothing. Your 
voice means nothing; your action 
means everything. 

Those who seek change must 
themselves be agents of the change 
that they seek 

When 1 was dissatisfied 
with the Collegian, I threw my 
hal into the ring and tried to 
make a difference. Along the 
way, I learned a tot about 
the hard work that goes 
into the paper you read 
every day 

And regardless of tile 
nit-picky complaints and 
the misunderstandings, 
the Collegian will be 
there, day -in and day- 
out It's the one 
K-Slale institution 
you can count on to 
keep all the others 
in check 



JtmMarwiftaiiMrtW 
bare, a better pcriM for 
taring worked at tht 
Cdbfian, Pteat* tend ywr 
s to Florida State 




Keep it coming: Collegian writers love hate mail 



column. 

ell you ^^^ 

eny / \ 



Prepare to hold back tears, for 
this is my last column 

Oh, I can tell you 
are all sad out 
there. Don't deny 
it 

You are all 
weeping at the 
fact that 
you can't be ABBY hiles 

pissed at me 

anymore, send me self-righteous 
hate mail or take the chicken's way 
out and call into the Fourum. 

Which is why 1 am dedicating 
this, my last piece of published 
"pontifical hooey" to you my fans 
and anti-fans, who have helped me 
grow as a writer 

Let us first take the Fourum 

Throughout this year, the gems 
published about me in the Fourum 
have been quite the sight Perhaps 
you remember some of the real win- 
ners such as: 

Abby Hilts: they should roU out 
the nd carpet and kiss your feet as 
we extradite you to KU. 

This obviously came after my 
open letter to the Kansan 

Not to mention three very 
strongly worded hate letters from 
various patrons of the Collegian, in- 
cluding some high school senior in 



Overland Park who I apparently 
"made the decision for him pretty 
easy" in choosing between KU and 
K- State, since KU would never pub- 
lish my sort of drivel. 

Way to stand up for yourself, 
man, and put me in my place 
Ouch. 

Or how about my pro -smoking 
column: 

In response to Abby Hiles' arti- 
cle as a non-smoker, I also have 
the right to breathe fresh air. 

Yeah, I never said you didn't 

Or just last week, a low persona) 
blow. 

Abby Hiles: that picture of you 
holding a bunny really accentuates 
your likeness. 

For the record, I normally like to 
hide my wings and talons, but for 
dan insisted in making my line art 
as accurate as possible 

Last week's column was also a 
treat for me as I walked to the 
Union and a girl began talking to 
me about SaveToby.com. She never 
realized who I was and fully made a 
fool of herself. I must be like Clark 
Kent, as when I have my hair in a 
pony tail, 1 don't resemble myself. 

So kudos to you, my dear - you 
made my day with real live reader 
disgust. 



The best part about hate mail is 
learning that it means noth- 
ing. In journalism or any 
occupation where you are 
in the public eye, people are 
going to dislike you. 

And that's fine A thick 
skin soon develops and 
pretty soon you learn to 
love all the reactions, 
positive and negative 
alike. Because you real- 
ize that most of the peo- 
ple who respond would 
n't put themselves out 
there every week the 
way you do and prob- 
ably couldn't do as 
good of a job. 

So to all of you 
out there who 
love sending re- 
sponses to the opin 
ion columnists here at 
the Collegian: keep it 
coming. 

And as for the person who sent 
me my last piece of hate mail over 
mule stereotypes. 

Don't worry, I won't mention 
your name as you asked me not to 
and told me if I did I "you'll be in 
trouble." 

You're secret's safe with me But 




I'll be damned if I'm going to be 
intimidated by a 90- pound weatlK 
from Lynn, Kan. H 

I don't care what frat you belong 
to. 



■^^r^W W^RlaT imsaw II j^*B W^aWly ■Pk^Wj f^a^Q BSD K 



CAMPUS FOURUM | 395-4444 -or- fdurum@spub.ksu.edu 



It* Camprnfowimlsthe 



tost how I fed about it. 




tit ikk the opinion of titi Cotegun nor 
m they endorsed by tht edtartal start 

m a* torn tjj* Mai *th you J do 
not ate too, ad) I do not Me you I thM 
ya Hare my file and my phony Thott 



for next 
to 

gooufarKJrwK'Iiun^ioseeifrhesrUp 
doeiaTtiMtfosaine. 



I MMi of/ dfof Sof f» just so It mid 
fctt the rwanutbufef off my bafts. 



i of PI taps* PM treat their 
■ tortet paper Ihey net wed 
and thrown out when they're done with 



•Mlmflsr1ta^.ttt just nobody at 
K -Suie Is cool enough to reatae It 



i aamat feeaad my car keys on third 
wCaMn Halt on Tuesday' I'd appreciate 



It If you could just turn them Into the 

Union km and found. Thank you. 



straight In eanh In action tfosi Cause we 
outlawed gayness In Kansas. 



Ttwaa^Maaatatjto Mglan*' you Hoy Calfofiaa, art a d— : not every 

UucMirpwrlhaPimMarSowhalr student uses SafeWde, but we ill fund it 

beuitterrtrjoodfocoufunimSftyThe 
TwaaiMfMmlninmnrlwurjhtrM same goes tor the CMd f>e*rteprnent 
was dead week WTR Center 

iTMMdowarliyttMUaiaurtvtrftso I JurttM Osama Unladen to my 



house. Run. 

What tht htffs with people passing 
our at hn/u 



FowvearOMciMt 









ppm^ifw«f«M 



| Friday, May 6, 2005 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



PageS 



Graduates can't use ID 

Summer Rec packages can be purchased for $25 



By Amy Ballon 

KANSAS SIAIffOl I FGMN 

K-State May graduates can't 
use their Wildcat ID card to use 
(He* Peters Recreation Complex 
once they've graduated. 

Instead, thjy can purchase a 
summer p;> ka ;e, which is also 
available to undergraduates 
who aren't enrolled in classes 
over the srmmcr. 

These packages cost $25 
plus tax lor the Rec Complex 
only, $1 J phi, tax lor the nata- 
torium \\.n\s only and $35 plus 
lax for a pass to both. It will be 
good from May 16 Aug, 21, said 
Kylie Pto klein, senior admin 
istrative assistant at the rec 

In order for K State gradu 
ates to purchase the summer 
package, they must have been 
enrolled in the spring semester. 

"They would come in, show 
their ID and we would verify 
that they were enrolled for the 



spring semester," Stoecklein 
said 

In the fall semester, May 
graduates can purchase mem- 
bership at the Rec Complex 
only at a layout rate of $30 a 
month plus tax 

After their first semester as a 
graduate, not counting the sum- 
mer, graduates can no longer 
buy a package through the rec 
for rec access. 

Instead, they can purchase a 
Rec Complex pass through 
membership in the K-State 
Alumni Association. 

"W? encourage them to pur- 
chase the alumni membership 
so that after the end of the se- 
mester, they can still purchase a 
rec membership," Stoecklein 
said. 

Craig Johnson, assistant di- 
rector for operation of the 
K-State Student Union, said 
there is nothing graduates can 
use their ID cards for that the 



university recognizes. 

"That's not to say that there 
aren't some businesses around 
town that might give a discount 
with a K State ID," Johnson 
said. 

Every semester, the ID Cen- 
ter gets a list of enrolled stu 
dents from the Registrar's Of- 
fice, and from that list, they are 
given access to things like the 
Rec Complex and the newspa 
pers through the readership 
program 

"Once an individual gradu- 
ates, they won't get that status," 
Johnson said. 

He said there is no reason to 
keep an ID card after gradua- 
tion unless a student is plan- 
ning on returning for graduate 
school. 

A graduate who goes to grad 
school at K-State could use 
their old ID card, and they 
wouldn't have to purchase a 
new one for $15 



Walk to raise money for Cystic Fibrosis Foundation 



By Joanna Rubick 
HUB SOKE CQUfiOMI 

People can take a stroll in 
City Park and help with fund 
raising efforts for cystic fibro 
sis. 

The Cystic Fibrosis Founda- 
tion is sponsoring its seventh 
annual 10K walk, said Telva 
Swenson, walk co-chair 

"We're hoping to have 100 
tfeSbie," Swenson said. "We'll 
walk around the park six 
tlpes" 

Registration begins at 8 
a>jn» and the walk -.turt> at 9 
u.(u. Saturday. It starts at the 
Cftyj'ark Pavilion Water trill 
be i&ovided throughout the 
walfct and there will be a 
ptrtluck lunch afterwards 



Cystic Fibrosis is a disease 
of the digestive track, especial- 
ly the pancreas, the airways 
and the reproductive system, 
said Bruce Schultz, associate 
professor of physiology 

"It is a genetic disease of salt 
transport, and so tissues that 
normally secrete salt and water 
are unable to do this," be said 

Schultz is conducting re 
search to learn more about the 
disease 

"That is continuing to make 
headway," he said 

Schultz said research in gen 
cral has made progress 

"Over the last 30 to 35 
years, the life expectancy for 
the cystic fibrosis patients has 
increased from less than seven 
years to well over 30 years" 




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If you go 

Cystic fibrosis walk 

When: Registration begins at 8 a. m. 
jnd the walk begins at 9 a.m. Saturday 
Where; City Parle Pavilion 
Cost. Donation 

Schultz said the CFF pro 
vick's a lot of money for re- 
search, so it is a worthy foun 
dation to support He said 
treatments are currently bcinj; 
developed. 

Trogress is being made and 
there are tools in the pipeline 
that give us hope, but each one 
of those has to be tested and 
developed, and the Cystic Fi- 
brosis Foundation is a key 
player in this task" Schultz 
said 



State energy director to discuss 
conservation during lecture series 



By Joanna Rubick 

KANSAS STMKOl I (WAN 

Energy affects every citi- 
zen 

Jim Ploger, director of the 
Kansas Energy Office at the 
Kansas Corporation Commis- 
sion, will talk about energy is- 
sues in the state Monday, 

The Riley County Democ- 
rats are sponsoring the 
speech, 

It is at 7 p.m at Valenti- 
no's, 3003 Anderson Ave 

Kalhryn Focke, chair of 
KCD, said energy is a hot 
issue right now. 

"There's a lot of talk about 
energy," Focke said. 

High gasoline prices at the 



pump make people aware of 
the crisis" 

Focke said Ptoger is very 
knowledgeable about the en- 
ergy situation and energy al 
ternalives. 

"He's a very important 
person for energy and energy 
conservation within the state 
of Kansas," she said 

Steve Smethers, vice chair 
of RCD, said President Bush's 
administration has ignored 
the energy crisis and looking 
at alternative fuel options 

"What are some of the al- 
ternative programs that are 
being proposed and why 
aren't those being discussed 
in this day and age of $2 1 2 
per gallon for gasoline," 



If you go 
Energy speech 

When : 7pm Monday 

t: Valentino's, 3003 Anderson Ave. 



Smethers said. 

Smethers said RCD will 
continue to have speakers at 
its monthly meetings. 

This summer Gov Kath- 
leen Sebelius will be a speak- 
er. 

Focke said energy is a 
topic with which everyone 
can relate 

"It's not just a Democratic 
issues. 

"It's an issue that goes into 
the hearts and pocketbooks 
of everybody," she said 



Chiefs players to attend fishing tourney 



By Eileen Laux 

KANSAS STATtCOtLEOAN 

Two Kansas City Chiefs' play- 
ers will participate the Kansas 
Vi ti rans' Memorial Bass Tour- 
nament Saturday 

It will honor fallen Kansas 
service men and women 

The tournament honors all 
Kansas veterans, but it is dedi- 
cated to two men who gave their 
lives Nov. 8, 2004, in Iraq 

First Sgt, Clinton Wisdom 
and Sgt Don Allen Clary were 
killed while serving with the 
Kansas Army National Guard's 
2nd Battalion, 130th Field Ar- 
tillery. 

Tile two men reportedly died 
sacrificing themselves in order to 
save the lives of their fellow sol- 
diers and the officials they were 
accompanying 

The tournament will be at 
Coffey County Lake, near the 
Wolf Creek Generating Station 



in Burlington, Kan The lake will 
be closed to the general public 
on Saturday 

Tackle Chris Bober and wide 
receiver Marc Boerigter are the 
Chiefs' players parti cipating. 

Check-in will be at 6 a.m., 
and the tournament will start at 
6:30 It will end at 2 p.m. and 
weigh in will be at 2:30 

Participants can enter the 
tournament until noon on Satur- 
day for a fee of $80 per team 
Teams are limited to two people 
toabtMi 

Staff Sgt Shane Black said 
anyone can enter the tourna- 
ment. 

"Please make sun- th.it you 
bring valid picture ID in order to 
get into the lake, since ii is near 
a power plant,"' he said 

Black said cash prizes will be 
awarded to the tup five places 
and sixth and seventh place will 
be awarded a rod and reel com 
bination. 



If you go 

Memorial Bass Tournament 

When: 6 am to 2 p m. Saturday 
Where: Coffey (ognty lake, neat Wolf 
Creek Generating Station, Burlington, 
KM 

The winners will be judged 
according to the weight of the 
small or large mouth bass 

He said a barbecue luncheon 
will also be prepared for the par- 
ticipants following the touma 
menl for a cost of around $5. 

Black said 50 percent of the 
proceeds from the tournament 
will he given to the families of 
fallen service men and women 

He said this is the first year of 
the tournament, but it will hope- 
fully be an annua) event 

"We are hoping for a good 
turnout, and if anyone has ques- 
tions, feel free to call us." he said 

"It is for a really good cause 
and should be a good time" 



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Page 6 



SPORTS 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Friday, May 6, 2005 



BASEBALL 



Wildcats 
look to gain 

ground in 
conference 



By Mitthsw Girard 
KANSAS STATt COLLEGIAN 

Heading into the last month of the season 
with the Big 12 Conference tournament just 
around the corner, the K-State Wildcats are on 
the outside looking in. 

Sitting in 10th place in the conference, the 
Wildcats (24-20, 7- 14) will try to gain some 
ground in the standings against the Oklahoma 
Sooners (24-20, 7-11) in a three-game series 
this weekend at Tointon Family Stadium 

Coach Brad Hill said it is a crucial weekend 
for his ball club, 

"We need to come out and play with confi- 
dence," Hill said. "Oklahoma is a good club, 
and they have very capable 
people on the field It's going 
to be a tough weekend." 

The Sooners sit in seventh 
place in the conference and 
are coming off of a 5-4 win 
over Wichita State on Tues- 
day, but will play out the rest 
of the season without their 
head coach, Larry Cachet). 

Cochell resigned Sunday 
after making racist remarks 
about a player (o two sepa- 
rate ESPN commentators 
before the Wichita State game 

Junior Steve Murphy said it is a tough situa- 
tion for the Sooner players 

"He (Cochell) had been with them along 
time," Murphy said. "It's a tough break for the 
players, especially where they are at right now, 
trying to fight for a spot in the tournament." 

Hill said he was shocked by Cochell's com- 
ments and subsequent resignation 

"It will be interesting to see how they re- 
spond, but obviously they have responded well 
by beating Wichita Stale," Hill said. "I'm sure 
they are going to come here fighting for a spot 
in the Big 12 tournament" 

Despite an impressive 26-7 win over Wash- 
burn on Wednesday, the Wildcats have had 
their own problems 

K-State dropped two-of-three games to in- 
state rival Kansas last week, dropping them 
back into last place in the conference. 

Murphy, who was 4-for-6 with two home 
runs and four RBIs against Washburn, said he 
is confident the Wildcats can make a run at the 
tournament. 

"They are going to be a tough team, no doubt 
about it," Murphy said. "It's going to be a pret- 
ty good series, but it's a series I think we can 
take" 



If you go 

K State vs. 
Oklahoma 

When: 6:30 tonight 2 
p.m Saturday, 
1 p.m. Sunday 
Where: Tointon Family 
Stadium 
Radio: 1350 AM 
DUN 




TRACK AND FIELD 



Catriru ftawton | COUKMM 
K Start's St*t Clancy pnfiiifflftiirtif llsllt lllWHTTuMm 
n»l«^jbwWp^i»rt^M<ta»4*Mttlth«Mftir^ 
it * JO tonight at t<*rt*n Family Sudton 



Final preparation 




Photo* by Or«w Rom | COUtGIAN 
K< State? Kyle Lancaster goes up met the bat In the Mot) lump < ompttitien tost movnlttlthtKaflsai Mays mUwrmcf.UncaiterlmhliH 
with a Iwigto or ri/T and placed st^m tht tjtat 



Team to compete in last meet 
before Big 12 Championships 



By Mark Potter 

KANSAS WTECOllfGWN 

One week before the highly- 
anticipated Big 12 Outdoor 
Championships in Manhattan, 
K-State will send its track and 
field team to compete at the Ne- 
braska Invitational on Saturday 
in Lincoln, Neb 

K-State head coach Cliff Kuv 
el to said he hopes Saturday's 
meet will help his squad prepare 
for the conference meet and add 
to K-State's list of 29 Midwest 
Regional qualifiers. 

"I think there are still possi- 
bilities for adding to (our num- 
ber of regional qualifiers)," Rov- 
elto said "We certainly hope so 
The reality is we arc going to 
have to have more if we have a 
chance at placing high as a team 
at the conference meet " 



Kuvfliti said he is pleased 
with the current state of his 
(cam's health and conditioning, 
and wants his athletes to remain 
healthy for the remainder of the 
season. 

"There is nothing really very 
seriuufc that we are battling right 
now," he said "We have a cou- 
ple people who arc not neces- 
sarily injured, but (they are) peo 
pie we need to be really careful 
with Hopefully we are all 100 
percent by the conference meet" 

K State will send nearly all its 
athletes to the Nebraska lnvita 
tional, which will also have 
competitors from the University 
of Nebraska, University of 
Kansas and Iowa State Universi- 
ty 

"We will have a lot of people 
competing, but not necessarily 
doing a whole lot (of events)," 




(.-States Btmmu EwUnd begins to tow 
i rrto the ah* during the sow vault GSMpttr 
tion at the Kansas Relays last mom*. 
Muni placed fourth hi th# women? 
rmttattonal pole mull. 

Kovelto said "For many yean 
now, we have gone (to Nebras- 
ka) the week before the confer- 
ence meet. Historically, it has 
been a very, very competitive 
meet. 

"People are very fit at this 

SMlNfflfflOIMirioell 



New Sprint Center should be home of the Kansas City Prairie Chickens 




Listen up, Kansas City 
I noticed you are building a new 
sports arena in the downtown area and 
arc looking for a possible 
third professional sports 
team to occupy the new 
Sprint Center, but don't 
waste the $250 mil 
Hon stadium on a 
National Hockey 
League team. 

Pot one. there are no NHL i 
betas; played, and even if there were, no* 
body Would care. Secondly, there are ab- 
solutely zero professional caliber hockey 
players coming out of the states of 

Kansas or Missouri 

What you need to do i* to bring back 
an NBA team 

It has been 20 yean since the Kings, 
left for greener pastures in Sacramento, 
Calif-, and now, it's time to bring a pro- 
tein back to the 



is no better place 
Within two hours 



to the east and west sit three Big 1 2 
schools with some of the most rabid bas- 
ketball fans in the country, and Kansas 
City is right in the middle. 

But don't worry, 111 help out and do 
some of the legwork for you I've come 
up with the name, team colors, the de- 
sign of the mascot and the name of the 
dance team. 1 did this so you officials 
can concentrate on the less important 
things, like coming up with the money it 
takes to run a professional organization. 

Note: no matter how an NBA team 
comes to town (either relocation or ex- 
pansion), these recommendations 
should be folknred, because I don't 
want the team to carry over a pre-exist- 
ing team name that makes no sense (see 
the Utah Jazz or New Orleans Hornets). 

I put a lot of thought into the name, 
and toyed with names such as the 
"MooCows; the "Kowboys" or the 
"• but none of these potential 



fur a 



1. 



! across lh« perfect 



Pans, I give you the Kansas City 
Prairie Chickens. 

Why the Prairie Chickens, you 
ask? 

All you have to do is look at 
the bird. It is one of the mean 
est looking birds 1 have ever 
seen (just check out my 
artist's rendition of 'Pact) 
the Prairie Chicken") Those 
bright orange throat sacks 
are definitely more in 
timidating than a 
Denver Nugget or a 
New Jersey Net 

There is noth- 
ing fancy behind 
the team colors. 
|ust take the bird's 
natural colon of brown 
and white and add some orange accents 
around the letters and 
on the jerseys. And if you want 
to venture into the alternative 

SstOOUiWraftll 





Stain brenner 




1 MINUTE 
DRILL 

The Associated Press 

TENNIS | Clijsters out of 

German Open with injury 

BERLIN — Kim Clijsters" status for 
the upcoming French Open is In doubt 
after she injured 
her right knee 
Thursday during 
a third-round 
match at the 
German Open. 

The Belgian 
slid awkwardly 
on the day court 
chasing down a 
ball m the 
second set Clljatars 

against Patty 

Schnydet and appeared to hurt her leg 
She received court-side treatment, ►* 
gave up a short time later. A WTA 
spokesman said It was a knee injury. 

The French Open starts Way 23. 

DERBY | Bellamy Road 5-2 

favorite for Kentucky Derby 

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — NkkZRo Is 
ready for a memorable Kentucky Derby. 
Yankees boss 
George 
Steinbrenner 
could use a good 
day, too. 

Bellamy 
Road, owned by 
the Boss and 
trained by Zlto, 
was made the 
S-2 favorite for 
Saturdays 

Derby based on his most recent 
runaway victory, a 1 7-length romp In 
the Wood Memorial last month. 

There were no arguments from the 
rest of the field 

"Off his last performance, he 
tamed it," Tim Rttchey, trainer of 9-2 
second choice Meet Ales said after 
Wednesday's post -position draw 

Bellamy Road will be ridden by 
Javier Gastellano. 

MLB | Boston fans won't be 
charged in scuffle 

BOSTON — Two Boston Red Sox 
fans who scuffled with New rort 
Yankees outfielder Gary Sheffield 
during a game last month won'! be 
charged after a court drsmissed the cas» 
Thursday for lack of evidence. 

Tht clerk magistrate said there 
was no probable cause to charge 
Christopher House and Matthew 
Donovan with misdemeanor disorderly 
conduct Mouse and Donovan were 
ejected from Fenway Park on April 14 
after House appeared to make contact 
with Sheffield as tht player chased 
dewn a ball in tr* outfield. 

Had the magistrate found probabk 
cause, criminal charges would haw 
been filed and the case referred to a 
judge 

Police had hied applications for 
criminal charges against House and 
Donovan, who apparently tossed a beet 
in Sheffield's direction during the 
scuffle. 

CFB | Nebraska player found 
innocent on assault charge 

NORMAN, OtU.- for more than 
a week in an Oklahoma courtroom, 
former Nebraska 
football player 
Darren Delone 
said nothing as 
prosecutors 
accused nan of 

QCHDtf Jiffy 

slamming into an 
Oklahoma spirit 
squad member, 
knotting out a 
tooth and 
wwertng another. 

Eight prosecution witnesses kfenti 
fled Delone' s jtrsty number — 67 — 
and said he violently drove his bodf 
■Mo a freshman member of Oil's 
Ruf/Neks Delone didn't ewn testify in 
his own defense 

After deliberating about three t 
hours, jurors found Ortone innocent' 
felony aggravated assault and bantry 
following a trial thai Nebraska athletic 
officials said had heightened concerns 
about sideline security and the role of 
ssfMrft groups andspecutofs on Owen 
Held 

NFL | Pitino hopes to returji 
by weekend 

CHARLOTTE. N.C.- Carolina 
Panthers linebacker Mart Fields wtji. ',"'' 
nttn the 2005 season after a iKumail! 
ofHodojun'sdiseast.hisagentsald 1 '" 
Thursday. 

Fields, 32, sat out the 2003 season 
while he battled me disease but 
returned last year to earn a trip tome' •' 
Pro Bowl. Htde<lJr^losion(jroina^' ? 
ofltfofacormactewernkmlnMarch, 
saying he wanted to wait until after in 
*«»^m«Wd»i<ln» that was patf" 
of lilt cancer treatment 




Datona 



yi 



rtr 



tfssweti that the Hodgkins: 
has returned and is In Its early stages 
aornt Am Sterner said. 



mmtm 



warn 



Nri^gsMMM 



-•^i,— -» — . r* 




ARTS | ENTERTAINMENT | SEX | FOOD | YOUR LIFE 

THE EDGE 



Friday, May 6, 2005 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Cooking out 




Successful barbequing requires skill, practice, grill 



By Dav* Skratta 

KANSAS SttTKOUEOAN 

Grilling out BBQ. Barbecue. " 

So which is it? 

"With a Q,"said Eddy Echols, man 
ager of the anginal Arthur Bryant's in 
Kansas City, Mo. " It's b-a-r-bc qui" 

He should know Arthur Bryant's 
has been serving up barbecue to 
celebrities and common folk for more 
than 80 years Stephen Spielberg, 
Robert Bedford and Jack Nicholson 
have all made the detour to Brooklyn 
Street, as have athletes like Wilt 
Chamberlain and George Brett 

"I guess it's so popular because it's 
different," Echols said "Back in the 
old days they'd always barbeque out- 
side in pit.\ Then they brought it in 
side Barbcque just has a different taste 
- a different flavor It's unique" 

Barbeque, Echols said, started in 
the south and migrated to the Mid- 
west, where it became entrenched in 
places like Kansas City, which is now 
considered the barbeque capital. 
* But Echols also said there's a big 
difference between barbeque and just 
"cooking out" 

"Lots of people nowadays use char- 
coal on a grill," Echols said "That's 
not real barbeque" 

Getting the best flavor isn't easy. It 
takes a combination of the right food, 
proper preparation and plenty of prac- 
tice - which people m Manhattan 
have gotten plenty of lately 

Richard Lehrman, a butcher at Dil- 



lons, said the unofficial barbeque sea- 
son is in full stride, 

"It started about three weeks ago, 
when we had that 6rst warm snap 
where ynu could get outside," 
Lehrman said. 

I la said he notices an increase in 
traffic past the meal counter every 
year at about this lime, but people 
never seem to go for the same thing 
Van fly, after all, is part of the bar 




Chits Han«wlr>ck«l | (Oilman 
Nathan Boepple, wfiiai in architectural 
erwjlnwfing, barbecues hamburgers *n<J 
bratwunt before the annul spring football gam* 
on April 29. 



beque mystique. 

"You can barbeque just about any- 
thing,'' Lehrman said "Pork ribs and 
beef ribs are very popular. Beef brisket 
is very good. You can marinate chick- 
en and slap it on the grill It depends 
on what you want to barbeque." 

It also depends on what you're bar- 
bequing with. While charcoal and gas 
grills provide an easy way out, the best 
flavor is had by wood In Kansas, 
hickory and oak are the most popular 

Then there's the seasoning, every 
thing from wet rubs to dry rubs to 
marinades that take days of soaking 
before they flavor. Most barbeque 
places have their own house spices 
that people can take home, but there's 
nothing that prohibits experimenting 

"It takes a lot of practice You can't 
just read a book and barbeque It takes 
practice," Echols said "People have 
been known to burn up their houses 
You have to know what you're doing" 

But you don't have to be an expert 
like Echols, either. Bob Kohman, se- 
nior in agriculture education, said he 
cooks out about every other weekend 

For them, hotdogs and burgers are 
gourmet enough. 

Kohman said a good barbeque 
doesn't have much to do with the food 
or preparation. All someone needs is 
the right company 

"The best part is spending time out- 
side with my friends when the wealh 
er is nice," Kohman said. "You can't 
beat barbequing. playing washers and 
drinking beer with friends." 



Movie nights, concert series to highlight summer events 



By J. Sam Bowman 

KANSAS STAJtCOtifQAN 

Summer is almost here, along with a 
hance to see live music. 

Several local and regional concerts and 
estiva! s are scheduled to start Saturday 
nd continue all summer. 

The local and on -going free summer 
oncert scries "Arts in the Park" will start 
iff Saturday with a sound check concert, 
.lelanle Godsey, recreation supervisor, 
aid. 

She said the concert series has been 
on and successful in the past, but this 
ummer will be different, since it is the se- 
ies' SOth anniversary and Manhattan's 
50th birthday 

"This will be a unique summer because 
t is the 150th celebration and sonic of the 
vents are in conjunction with ours," God- 
ey said. "We're going to bring back movie 
lights that will take place after the Chau 
auqua events 

"We used to have a movie night here 15 
ear* ago, and I wanted to bring it back." 



For more information 

Arts in the Park 

ww w. a matitmrt an. Jb. ui/ParisAndRec/ 
Country Stampede 
www.cmmtrptamptde am/ 
Wakanna Musk and Camptnj festival 

www wokanjia.com 

Rodrfwt 

www.mckfestk.com 

People can expect good, quality enter 
tai mi lent in a family atmosphere. She said 
the activities take place each Friday and 
Saturday from the first weekend in June to 
the second weekend in August. 

She said part of what makes the con- 
cert series so successful is the venue, 
which b second to none, 

"It's a nice setting with a new stage and 
shade trees," she said "People can watch 
on the bleachers or bring out a blanket to 
sit on. A lot of the bands aren't used to 
performing on a stage like this or having 
the sound and lighting that wc have. 

"Basically, we take care of them; all 



they have to worry about is playing" 

She said there will be a wide variety of 
music to fit several music tastes 

Another local concert festival that is 
celebrating an anniversary is the Country 
Stampede, which is June 23 26 

This will be the 10th year for the Stam- 
pede, said Wayne Rouse, president and 
general manager for the Country Stam 
pede He said people should expect some 
surprises to celebrate the anniversary. 

"It's basically four days of music and 
camping," Rouse said, "With today's top 
country talent and legends like ZZ Top. 

"We will be doing some different things 
and have some special events. The Red 
Bull motoeross team will be out Saturday 
doing some stunts." 

Rouse said something that sets apart 
the Country Stampede is the fact that they 
have a JumboTron screen for the event 

"We have a )umboTron that has a 
screen that is 27 feet wide and 20 feet tall," 
he said. 

"So no matter where you're at you can 
see the artist and enjoy the music. 



"I just hope everyone who comes out 
has a good time and we don't get any 
rain." 

Kansas City has a concert festival of its 
own each summer 

June 11 will be Rockfest, at Liberty 
Memorial Park - a day-long festival with 
bands Seether, Shinedown, Chevelle and 
Static X, Blair Pierce, assistant promo- 
tions director for KQRC 98 9-FM, said 

"Basically, it's not a concert but a festi- 
val," Pierce said. 

"There's not going to be just 15 bands 
on two stages, but there will be vendors 
and things on display. 

"In the past we've had motorcycles on 
display, we had hot air balloons and we 
had live tigers" 

He said people travel from outside the 
state to see Rockfest, which has been a 
98.9-FM tradition since the station start- 
ed in 1992. Part of what attracts so many 
people is that there is so much to do. 

"There are other things to do than just 
listen to the music,'' Pierce said "And in 
the end, there's a huge fireworks display" 




Kutcher 



Page 7 



MOVIES 

■ Times for today through 
Thursday. 

■ All times are p.m. unlets other- 
wise noted. 

*AUt Like Lave* 

(PC 13)5,7:40. 
10:10 

Ashton Kutcher 
start in director 

Nigel Cole's 
feature about a 
man and a 

woman who find 
love, but unfortu 

nately the timing 

is not right for 

either of them. 

However, fate seems to step in and 

bring the two back together when the 

timinq is right 

'Amrtyville Horror" 

(8) 5:10, 7:20, 9:10 
A young couple (Ryan Reynolds, 
Melissa George) and their children 
move into a house that was once the 
site of a horrific series of murders 

train* 

(R) 5:10, 7:30, 9:50 
Set in post 9/1 1 Los Angeles, this 
urban drama follows several charac- 
ters of different races and social class, 
observing how their beliefs and preju- 
dices affect them when they interact 
and collide within a 36-hour period. 

'Guess Who" 

(PG-13) 4:30, 7:15, 9:45 
A remake of the 1967 Sidney 
Poitier-Katharlne Hepburn drama, 
this comedy follows a young man 
named Simon (Ashton Kutcher) as he 
meets his fiancee's father, Percy 
(Bernie Mac), for the first time 

"Hitchhiker's Guide to the Gataiy* 
|K) 5:05, 7:30, 9:55 
Based on the best -selling book by 
Douglas Adams, who also wrote the 
screenplay, Hitchhiker's Guide begins 
as Arthur Dent (Martin Freeman) 
realties that his house is about to be 
demolished. He soon learns from ford 
Prefect (Mos Def), his friend — who 
is really an alien — that the whole 
Earth is going to be destroyed in order 
to build an intergalactic highway 
bypass 

"House of Wax" 
(R) 4:30, 7:05, 9 40 
A group of friends on their way to a 
college football game Falls prey to a 
pair of murderous brothers in an 
abandoned small town They discover 
that the brothers have expanded upon 
the area's main attraction - the House 
of Wax - and created an entire town 
filled with the wax- coated corpses of 
unlucky visitors 

"Kingdom of Heaven* 
iRI 405, 4:45, 7:10, 8, 10:15 
Set during the 12th century in the 
holy city of Jerusalem. Orlando 
("Pirates of the Caribbean") Bloom 
plays a young peasant blacksmith who 
becomes a knight so that he may help 
repel the Crusaders who took control 
of the city In 1099. Meanwhile, the 
young knight also falls in love with the 
city's beautiful princess (Eva Green). 

"Sahara* 

(PG-13) 4,7,9:45 
Explorer Dirk Pitt (Matthew 
McConaughey) and his slacker stdekick 
(Steve Zahn) embark on a treasure 
hunt through West Africa in search of 
what locals call the Ship of Death, a 
lost Civil War bartleship that may 
house a very valuable cargo. 

"SlnCfty" 

(R) 4:10, 7:20, 9:05 

An adaptation of Frank Miller's graphic 

novels based in the fictional town of 

Sin City, this drama follows Marv, a 

tough guy who meets the girl of his 

dreams, Goldie, only to see her 

murdered on that same night Marv 

then searches every bat and shady 

hideout in Sin City looking for the 

killer 

The 

Interpreter* 
(PG-13) 4:1 5, 7:, 
10 

Nkole Kidman 

plays a U.N. 

Interpreter from 

South Africa who 

unintentionally 

hears details of a 

political assassi 

nation plot and 

has to convince a doubtful FBI agent 

that something barfs going down 

'XXX: State of the Onion" 

(PG-ll) 5:25,7:45, 10 
This sequel follows the adventures of 
a criminal (Ice Cube) who is coerced 
by NSA Agent Gibbons (Samuel L. 
Jackson) Into becoming a field agent 
under then new *XXX* program 
(which stands for "three strikes and 
you're out") Gibbons and his new 
agent must track a dangerous military 
splinter group, led by Wlllem Daloe, 
that Is conspiring to overthrow the 
U.S. Government In the nation's 
ofML 




Kidman 



wmmmmmm 



■•■^"■••^•••^N^*"^ 



* * — ^^W ' | * l*»^% ■ 



Page 8 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Friday, May 6, 2005 



Greek drinking policies aimed at 
preventing underage drinking 



By Jetilca Holland 
KANMSSTMUOUiGUN 

Drinking policies (or greek 
houses and residence halls vary 

The K-State Annual Campus 
Safety Report stales thai many in 
dividual components at K-State 
have their own policies and pro- 
cedures. 

Greek Affairs enforces its pol 
icy for dry rush and its joint Inter 
fraternity Council/Panhellenic 
Council alcohol policy, adopted 
in September 199 1 . The Depart- 
ment of Housing and Dining Ser 
vices also has special regulations 
for the nearly 4,000 students who 
live in the residence hulK 

For all the residence halls on 
campus, the alcohol policy is the 
same. 1 1 states unless a student is 
at least 21 years old, there is no 
alcohol allowed on the premises 
If the student is 21. only 3 2 per 
cent alcohol is allowed on llu- 
property, and it must be con- 
tained to dial student's room 

To monitor students, the resi- 
dence hall staffs are allowed to 
search any suspicious bags at any 
time, and resident assistants are 
allowed to search rooms 

Jessica St. Andrew, senior in 
criminology, is a multicultural as- 
sistant at Ford Hall 

"On Thursday, Friday and Sat- 
urday nights we watch bags more 
carefully, and we make sure that 
(he girls are safe as we watch for 
alcohol," St. Andrew said 

However, many students spec 
ulate that more extreme mea- 
sures are taken to monitor behav- 
ior 

Kori Mnshurj;, freshman in 
open option, said she has never 
been caught, because she knows 
better than to drink in her room. 

"A lot of people I know have 
been caught One time we 
opened up the door and the RA 
was right there listening to what 
was going on in the room, and 
she said she thought there were 
cans opening when there wasn't," 
Mosburg said. 

While Ford officials said the 
amount of students getting 
caught fluctuates, some students 
said a problem exists, but the 
punishments do not always deter 
the act from happening again. 

Nicole Shoemaker, freshman 
in marketing, has been caught 



more than once 

"They don't ever give warn 
nigs," Shoemaker said. 

If (In rules are broken, a re- 
port is filed and the case goes to 
the assistant coordinator and 
then on to a Judicial Board 

Once found guilty, the stu- 
dents are sanctioned Usually 
after a first offense, the student is 
forced lo see a counselor up to 
three limes or write a paper 
jhnui their faults. On a six mid 
offense, students can be told to 
sec the COUnMlOf more and, de- 
pending i m i lie offence, more se- 
nous consequences may result 

(Catherine Spicss, junior in an- 
imal sciences and industry and 
resident of Haymaker Hall, said 
the RAs make rounds and if a 
student is found with alcohol 
they are sent lo "| Board," where 
a pane! of students within llu 
hall decide on sanctioning and 
punishments tike alcohol classes 

For greek houses, the policies 
vary from house to house. The K- 
State Greek Affairs Substance 
Abuse Policy states that posses- 
sion, use and/or consumptii m of 
alcoholic beverages, while on 
chapter premises, during a social 
event, or in any situation spon 
sored or endorsed by a chapter, 
musl be in compliance applicable 
laws by the state, county, cily and 
K-Stalc, This means no underage 
drinking period. 

Some fraternities are "dry' 
meaning that no alcohol is al- 
lowed in or on the property. 

Beta Theta Pi fraternity admits 
to having occasional problems 
with alcohol in the house 

Beta president Brad Scheu. 
sophomore in prc-med ccoihuii- 
ics, said they have a special com- 
mittee that handles the viola- 
tions At Beta, the rule is three 
strikes and the member is out 

"No one has been kicked out 
yet for it, generally the commiltec 
alleviates the problem," Scheu 
said. 

Other fraternities said their 
situations arc similar, but refused 
lo comment Those that allow 
drinking simply say they are a 
"wet" fraternity They prohibit 
underage drinking at events and 
at the chapter house, and all 
members go through an alcohol 
education program 

While all sororities are dry, the 



consequences of getting caught 
are different for each house 

Most chapters require the 
member in violation to report to 
u committee which addresses the 
problem and determines the nec- 
essary punishment 

One example of this is Greeks 
Advocating the Mature Manage- 
ment of Alcohol {GAMMA). 
GAM MA is set up as a place for 
people to come and they leam 
about alcohol and health issues. 

Emily Flemming, adviser for 
GAMMA, said the group informs 
its members of the negative con- 
sequences of drinking when it is 
not managed correctly, and while 
(hey don't condone drinking, 
they encourage those who do 
choose to drink to do so in a ma- 
ture and responsible manner. 

Bill Arck, director of Alcohol 
and Other Drug Education Ser- 
vice, said their office is primarily 
here to assist any group or indi- 
vidual on campus with questions 
or concerns or other drugs use 
and abuse They are invited to 
residence halls and greek houses 
and lo certain events and func- 
tions to speak, but one topic not 
usually addressed is underage 
drinking. 

"The major purpose of our 
program is to provide info on the 
physical effects and social issues 
related to alcohol and other drug 
use," Arck said. 

He said that research shows 
the average age K-State students 
began drinking is 15, so they 
have made the choice as to 
whether or not they are drinkers 
already. 

"Universities, and K-State in 
particular, find themselves being 
expected to change social pat- 
terns that are established before 
enrollment and which are gener- 
ally accepted in adult society," 
Arck said 

"There are rules and laws con- 
cerning underage drinking, and 
we don't want to minimize those, 
but we're more interested with 
risk prevention and harm reduc- 
tion" 



Knitting a relaxing pastime 



By Lacey 0. Mackcy 

KANSAS STMKOUfGIAN 

Knit one, purl two. 

Knitting is not just for 
grandmothers anymore. 

Stylish stitching and trendy 
yam has made knitting the "in 
thing- 
less Eisimingcr, sophomore 
in early childhood education, 
said she's been knitting since 
her junior year of high school. 

A class was being offered at 
her high school, but 
Eisiminger said her mom 
would not tel her take it be- 
cause she thought it was a 
waste of a class. But now, her 
mom frequently asks her to 
make hats and other projects 
for her, Eisiminger said 

While different projects 
take different blocks of time, 
Eisiminger said it takes her 
about two and a half hours to 
finish a standard hat. 

"It's a relaxing pastime," 
Eisiminger said. "You can sit in 
front of the television and 
watch a movie and do some- 
thing productive." 

A pair of finger less gloves 
were the smallest item 
Eisiminger has made, wilh 
yarn a little thicker than 
thread, but she said her hard- 
est project was probably a pair 
of slippers for which she creat- 
ed the pattern 

Comfortable with both 
knitting and crocheting, 
Eisiminger said both have 
their pros and cons 

"Knitting takes a lot of 
practice, and it's harder to fix 
your mistakes," Eisiminger 




Photo initiation by Chrli H«nc«liKkel | fOIUGIAN 



said "I think knitting is a little 
bit harder to learn, but easier 
to master Crocheting has a lot 
of stitches and techniques." 

Kennita Tully, owner of 
Wildflower Yarns and 
Knitwear located on S. Fourth 
Street in Manhattan, said knit- 
ting can be difficult, but it is 
possible. 

"Knitting isn't hard, it just 
takes coordination," Tully said. 

Tully said her store offers 
classes and lessons for anyone 
who wants to learn the fine art 
of knitting. 

Beginning and intermediate 
classes are available; the be- 
ginning classes cost $30 and 
last for four weeks Tully also 
offers college knit nights dur- 
ing the semester, teaching stu 
dents for free and offering dis- 
count on merchandise. 

"There are a lot of college 
kids knitting," Tully said. "1 
think it's the yarns they've 



gotten a lot more fun." 

While fun scarves and items 
can be created with a talented 
hand, Tully suggested begin 
ners keep it simple 

"People are really eager to 
start with novelty yarn, but I 
usually start them on smooth 
yarn, preferably light," Tully 
said. 

Tully said knitting has got- 
ten extremely popular in sever 
al venues, including teaching 
the skill in elementary and 
high schools 

"There are a lot of celebri- 
ties that are knitting now, too," 
Tully said "Some think thai 
after 9-1 1, people went back to 
a quieter, calmer life, but it 
started to be popular before 
that." 

And now - knitting could bt 
considered all the rage. 

"It's gotten to be reallj 
trendy." Eisiminger said. "It's 
all about the knitting" 



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Friday, May 6, 2005 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 9 



Chapters begin recruiting 



By Kristen Roderick 

KANSAS STATE C0HK.IAN 

Wilh this semester coming 
to a close, houses in K- State's 
greek system are working to 
recruit potential pledges for 
next semester. 

To become a part of a fra- 
ternity or sorority, potential 
pledges must first Till out a bi- 
ography card and wait for the 
recruitment chair from each 
house to contact them. 

Til contact them by 
phone," said Ryan Collett, ju- 
nior in kinesiology and mem- 
ber of Pi Kappa Alpha "That 
helps me get a feel for what 
type of person they are" 

Collett said getting ahold 
of the potential pledges is the 
toughest part of recruiting 

"1 sometimes go through 
30 rush calls in a night," he 
said. "Sometimes 1 can only 
talk to about five people be- 
cause they're busy doing 
stuff." 

After the recruit chair con- 
tacts the potential pledge, 
they are asked lo visit the 
house so the other members 
can meet them. 

"I tell them what our prin- 
ciples are and what type of 



people we like in our house.'' 
Collett said. "I tell them how 
we're ranked among other fra- 
ternities and then ask them to 
come to the house to show 
them what goes on 1 talk with 
the rest of the house about 
guys who we think are good 
and will benefit our house" 

Collett said recruits come 
from high schools to rush 
events or visit days, and the 
fraternity has different activi- 
ties for them to do. 

Occasionally, potential 
pledges will visit K-Stale for a 
day and attend classes wilh 
members of the fraternity in 
their particular field of study 

Kelscy Harpster, member 
of Alpha Delta Pi and sopho- 
more in biology and pre-med- 
icine, said they get potential 
pledges from greek affairs 

"Recruits are organized 
through Greek Affairs," Kelscy 
Harpster, sophomore in biolo 
gy and pre-medicine, said 
"They reach out to high 
schools and normal K-State 
recruitment" 

Harpster said her sorority 
also looks to friends of the 
members for other potential 
pledges. 

"They can come any time 



they want and talk to the 
girls," she said "We just give 
them our spiel and tell them 
what we're all about. If they 
can get along with the people 
who live here, it's good." 

Collett said his house looks 
to friends and alumni of the 
fraternity. 

"We gel a lot of recruits 
through referrals from the 
guys in the house," Collett 
said. "A lot of our alumni will 
send recommendations from 
their hometowns. Sometimes 
we have guys come in from 
other colleges, where the rush 
chairs have a younger brother 
or someone who's going to K- 
State." 

Thus far. Pike has 12 
pledges signed for fall 2005. 

"That is normally where 
we're at right now," Collett 
said "We're waiting on sign- 
ing a couple of more guys. We 
will rJrobably end up with 
about 25 for next semester." 

Harpster said last year, 
ADPi had 53 new members. 

"There were 600 new mem- 
bers in sororities last year," 
she said. "They try to fill each 
house and it gets split up For- 
mal recruitment is the only 
way our chapter functions," 



Soaking up the sun 




Manhattan to offer sand volleyball 



By Zacrtary T. £<*•)* 

KANSAS STATE (0U1GIAN 

Adult sand volleyball will 
lake place at the Wildcat Creek 
Sports and Fitness Center this 
swmmcr. 

■ The league will include three 
divisions: men, women and co- 
r£.\ Teams competing will play 
t^o matches one night each 
week during their session. 

•'live Co-Rec division plays 
Monday or Tuesday night, and 
tffBjnen play Wednesday or 
Thursday night and that would 
belhe same for men if we have 



it," said Mike Buchanan, assis- 
tant retreat inn superintendent 
"We've offered men's before, 
but never have had enough 
teams to have a division" 

If there aren't enough men 
in a session this year, those who 
did register will get their money 
back, he said They would also 
have the option of adding 
women to their team and play- 
ing in the Co-Rec division 

The other two divisions 
have usually had about 15 
teams per session, Buchanan 
said In order lo be eligible to 
play on one of these teams 



players must be IS years old or 
must have graduated high 
school. 

At the end of each session, 
the league champion is deter 
mined by the number of games 
won and lost by each team, he 
said. The league champions are 
awarded T-shirts, 

Registration, which costs 
$H0, is due today for the first 
session and is due June 24 for 
the second session. Anyone 
who wants lo register can pick 
up a form from Manhattan 
Parks and Recreation or Ngb- 
ter online on their Web site 



Chris Hanawlnck** | (OtHGMN 

Ann* Kmiiit, freitinun in f jimly studies hum*!) wnricf, w*ds *f ilHi. K«m md th« Plaque" ttm itninq on t ha* in ttw Bows tm 
Speech Zone Tuesday afternoon. 



Foundation helps local inventors 



By J, Scott Bowman 

KANSAS STATKOt If GIAN 

Patents and inventions are 
part of the spoils of a universi- 
ty like K- Stale thai has a strong 
research tradition. 

That is where the Kansas 
State University Research 
Foundation comes into play, 
providing resources to help in- 
ventors and researchers to 
palent their inventions, said 
Marcia Molina, director of 
technology transfer at the 
Foundation 

The Foundation has had 175 
U.S. patents issued since 1976 

One of the more recent 
patents issued was to K- State 
inventor Gordon Andrews, 
professor of veterinary medi- 



cine. His patent is US Patent 
No. 6,860,895 for a method 
and kit for typing feline blood 

Andrews said the Founda- 
tion does most of the legwork 

"1 helped the original appli- 
cation with the patent attor- 
ney, who was provided by the 
Foundation, and he turned il 
over to me for scientific accu- 
racy, and the Foundation did 
most of the resl of the work," 
Andrews said 

The patent doesn't bring in 
money, but provides protection 
for commercialization, An- 
drews said. 

He said the Foundation gets 
the royalties from the product, 
and the Foundation sends a 
portion of the royalties to the 
inventor and to the department 



the inventor works in. 

Molina said the Foundation 
keeps the rights to any patent 
She said the inventor receives 
25 percent of the royalties the 
Foundation receives She said 
the department of the inventor 
receives 10 percent 

Yongming Sang, senior sci 
entist in anatomy utd physiol- 
ogy, said his first patent. No. 
6,756,526 entitled "Drought 
Tolerant Plants and Methods 
of Increasing Drought Toler 
ance in Plants," took three 
years to process the patent. 

He said the time it took to 
get the patent was worth it. 

"It's nice lo know your re- 
search paid off, and it's a way 
that can potentially make some 
money," Sang said 




KSU 

Class of 05 




Ashley Dunbar 

Congratulations! 

We are proud of you! 

Love, Mom & Dad 




KSU 

Class of 05 




Amanda Gard 

Way to go! We are so proud of you! 

You go, girl! 

Love, Your Family 



KSU 

Class of 05 



Jack Fries 

All the hours of hard work 

the last five years 

have certainly paid off. 

Congratulations, 
we are all so proud of you. 



Love, Mom, Dad, Grandma, Grandpa, JaNay, Jim, 
Meleia, Alexa, Reed, Staci, Montana, Brock 




2005 KANSAS STATE 



FOOTBALL! 



SEPTEMBER 3 
EPTEMBER 24 
CTOBER 8 
CTOBER 22 
OCTOBER 29 
NOVEMBER 19 



vs. Florida Int'l 
vs. North Texas 
vs. Kansas 
vs. Texas A&M 
vs. Colorado 
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Be Proud. Be Purple. GO STATE! 



GETTHEMONKATS! 




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rQ liO llQ Staff Applications 



We are sending out the 2005-2006 Faculty/Staff Parking Permit 

applications via e-mail. You should receive an e-mail that will allow 

you to fill out your form and then print and return it to Parking 

Services. An actual signature is mandatory, 

It you do not receive this e-mail, please look at our web site, 

ksu.edu/parklng, and under forms, fill out the 2005-2006 Faculty/Staff 

Parking Permit application. After you sign the form, please return 

via campus mail to Parking Services. 

You may use your new permit as soon as you receive it, Please 
destroy your old permit after displaying your new one. 

Your permits will be sent to your campus address after July 1 , 2005. If 

you have returned the application 2 weeks or more ahead of July 

31, 2005. you will receive your new permit before you present permit 

has expired. If you have any questions, please contact 

Parking Services at 532-7275, 



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rf r rr ff i > f f rt 'W^ »^' i' P f f^nf*y*> » *■ e »^ — r -a»T» »t» ^»— ^ i 






Page 10 



ONCE IN A LIFETIME 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Wedding 
announcements 




Friday, May 6, 2005 



Becker Cline 

Laurel C Becker, junior in mass communication*, 
and D. Taytot Cline, senior in architecture, announce 
their engagement. 

laurel is the daughter of Greg and Pam Better of 
Abilene, Kan., and D. laylor is the son of Dan and ■ 
Sandy Cline and Terry and Lee Anne Encjler, of LeeV . 
Summit, Mo 

They plan a July 30 wedding in Abilene, Kan 




Dekat Knippenberg 

Shania Dekat, K- State graduate, and 
Peter Knippenberg, senior in manage 
merit, announce their engagement. 

Shania is the daughter of Chris and 
Karen Dekat of St George, Kan., and Peter 
is the son of John and Jane Knippenberg of 
Great Bend, Kan. 

They plan a Dec. J wedding in 
Manhattan 




Geer Klosterman 

Jamie Lee Geer, senior in interdispli- 
nary social science, and Christopher Robert 
Klosterman, announce their engagement 

Jamie is the daughter ol John and 
Unda Geer of Overland Park, Kan., and 
Christopher is the son of Kurt and Jana 
Klosterman of Overland Park. Kan 

They plan a May 20, 2006 wedding in 
Parkville.Mo. 




Good-Zimmerman 

Andria Good, senior tn elementary 
education, and Lance Zimmerman, senior 
tn agricultural communications, announce 
their engagement 

Andria is the daughter of Richard and 
Karen Good of Lansing. Kan., and Lance Is 
the son of Loran and Jolene Zimmerman 
of Schoenchen, Kan 

They plan a July 30 wedding in 
Manhattan. 




Grimmer-Pettit-Scott 

Rachel Grimmer, senior in secondary 
education math, and Sol Pettit Scott, 
K State graduate, announce their engage- 
ment 

Rachel is the daughter of Cynthia and 
David Grimmer of Owasso, Ok la , and Sol is 
the son of Mary Perm and David Scon of 
Palatine, III. 

They plan a July 9 wedding in 
Wichita 




Grosse Thomassen 

M i randa J G rosse, sophn mo re in , 
veterinary medicine, and Mkhael P 
Thomassen, sophomore in veterinary 
medicine, announce their engagement 

Miranda Is the daughter of Randy and 
Pamela Grosse of maha. Neb. , and 
Michael is the son of lohn and Marsha 
Thomassen of Atkinson, Neb. 

They plan a July 30 wedding In 
Omaha, Neb 




Gwaltney O'Hara 

Malinda Gwaltney and lohn O'Hara. 
K State graduate, announce theit engage 
ment 

Malinda is the daughter of Mark and 
Tami Gwaltney of Lawrence, Kan., and 
John is the son of Barbie and Gary O'Hara 
ofSaliru, Kan 

TheypUnaDec. 17weddingin 
Lawrence, Kan 




Haley-Simonson 

Dana Haley. K-State graduate, and 
Lawrence Simonson, K State graduate, 
announce their engagement 

Dana is the daughter of Paul and 
Kathy Haley, Paola, Kan., and Lawrence is 
the son of Larry Simonson of Ciay Center, 
Kan., and Karen Simonson of Wakefield, 
Kan. 

They plan an Oct. 1 wedding in Paola. 
Kan 



Horgan Riener 

Amy Horgan. K State graduate, and 
James Riener, K- State graduate, announce 
their engagement. 

Amy is the daughter of Tim and Linda 
Horgan of Wheaton, Kan, and James is the 
son of Karol Riener and the late Patricia 
Riener of Hemdon, Kan 

They plan an August 2 1 wedding In 
Manhattan. 




lindenstein Schnell 

Knsten Linden si em, junior in finance, 
and Mark Schnell, junioi in secondary 
education, announce their engagement 

Knsten is the daughter of Kevin and 
Joan Lindenstein of Gibbon, Neb., and 
Mark is the son of James and Julie Schnell 
of Kimball, Neb 

They plan a July 29 wedding in 
Kearney, Meb. 




Roland- Whitney 

Sara Roland, senior in marketing, and 
Cody Whrtney, senior in kinesiology, 
announce their engagement 

Sara is the daughter of Collie and 
Sheri Roland of Clearwater, Kan, and Cody 
Is the son of Ken and Pam Whitney of 
Santa re. N.M. 

They plan a July 16 wedding in 

Jo ill to, ndii. 






Attendants get wedding gifts, too 




By L»c«y Storcr 

KANSAS SMtUQlLEGiAN 

When a couple is planning 
their wedding, the wedding 
party plays a big part in help- 
ing out They run errands, they 
make phone calls and they 
help keep the bride and groom 
from going crazy 

For all that work, they de- 
serve a nice gift 

Gifts for the wedding party 
are a way to show them their 
presence and work are appre- 
ciated, and a way to thank 
them for it. 

There is a wide range of op- 
tions couples have when 
choosing their wedding party 
gifts, ranging from the tradi- 
tional to the modem 

For bridesmaids, the gift is 
usually an accessory, some- 
thing they can wear with their 
bridesmaids dress, according 
to TheKnot.com This includes 
earrings, bracelets or neck- 
laces. 

Charles Reed, owner of 
Reed and Elliot Jewelers, sug- 
gested a single pearl on a 
chain, or a bracelet with a 
charm The charm could hi 
something like a wedding bell 
to remind them of the special 
day. 

Some non jewelry tradition 
a) gifts for the bridesmaids in- 
clude sterling silver compacts, 
pocket mirrors and small jew- 
elry boxes Sterling silver items 



are popular because they are 
engravable, which makes the 
gift a bit more personal 

Por the groomsman. Reed 
said popular items are tie clips 
or chains, cuff links or a money 
clip. Reed said small pocket 
knifes are also sometimes 
given as gifts. 

TheKnot com lists engraved 
flasks, beer steins and cigars or 
cigar paraphernalia as com- 
mon traditional gifts. 

Betty Campbell, owner of 
Campbell's China and Gifts, 
suggested personalized station- 
ary, silver frames or photo al- 
bums and key rings as tradi- 
tional gifts that could work for 
bridesmaids and groomsmen, 

Por couples wanting to go a 
more modern route, The- 
Knot, com suggests tailoring 
the gifts to the attendants' per- 
sonalities Some unique sug- 
gestions (or bridesmaid gifts in- 
clude tickets to a musical, 
hand decorated frames, 
gourmet coffee and gift certifi- 
cates for a spa treatment. 

Por guys, some gift ideas are 
tickets to a sporting event or 
concert, sports gear or even 
electronic gadgets. 

When choosing gifts for the 
wedding party, there arc a few 
things couples should keep in 
mind 

The age group the atten- 
dants are in, if they're profes- 
sionals or students, if it's some- 
thing they would use are things 




Campbell said couples should 
consider. 

Another tip is to have plen- 
ty of time to shop, in case the 
gifts are not available right 
away 

"Some stores don't carry the 
numbers and need to order 
from the catalogue," Reed said 

Time should also be allowed 



for engraving. 

As for the price range, there 
is no set limit. Expensive gifts 
will be appreciated, but gifts 
can be special even if they are 
inexpensive or handmade As 
long as couples put some 
thought into the gifts, the wed- 
ding party will know they are 
appreciated. 




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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 1 1 



Look for 4 C's when buying the ring 



By Abby Brownbadt 

KM6M STATE COUECJAN 

It's one of the last things the 
man has a say in before the wed 
ding 

An engagement ring, while 
often a joint decision, is usually 
purchased by the groom-to-be. 
Area jewelers have some tips for 
those looking lo buy a ring. 

Lee Haar, goldsmith and cus- 
tom design specialist with G 
Thomas Jewelers, stressed the im- 
portance of selecting a wearable 
ring. 

"It needs to be functional, 
durable and something you like," 
he said. 

The craftsmanship, the quality 
and the style are three factors to 
consider in addition to the four 
C's of diamonds including cut, 
ciaaty, color and karat, Haar said. 



There are two parts to the cut 
of a diamond, he said. Most peo- 
ple think of the shape, such as 
round, marquee, heart, pear, 
princess or emerald But buyers 
also need to observe "the way the 
stone is actually cut to bring out 
the true brilliance of the dia- 
mond," Haar said 

Lash el Turner, sales associate 
at Eldrige Pine Jewelers in Tope- 
ka, said when men come in look- 
ing for a ring with which to sur- 
prise their girlfriends, they often 
buy round diamonds. 

"It's very traditional, very clas- 
sic," she said. 

Dean Behrens, senior in fami 
ly life and community services, 
bought his fiancee a round dia- 
mond after about a month of 
learning about the stones, looking 
at Web sites and browsing 
through jewelry stores. 



"It just sparkles more," he said. 
"It goes well with the ring" 

Clarity refers to a lack of nat- 
ural inclusions, or birthmarks for 
a stone, Haar said Since dia- 
monds are a carbon -based stone, 
there can be carbon snots or 
feathers in them, which lower the 
clarity grading, 

"Clarity is the sparkle and the 
brilliance,'' Turner said. 

Diamonds range from color- 
less to colored, with colorless at 
the higher end of the price scale, 
Haar said. Turner said letters of 
the alphabet classify diamonds, 
starting with colorless denoted as 
D, E and P 

The karat weight is the size of 
the diamond. Because G Thomas 
Jewelers does business with many 
students and members of the mil- 
itary, Haar said their biggest sell- 
ers are between 1 /4 karat and 3/4 



karat. Turner said Eldrige Pine 
Jewelers sells 1/4 to 1 karat dia- 
monds, on average. 

"A lot of that has to do with 
price range" she said. 'To some 
people (color) doesn't matter, 
they just want the biggest dia- 
mond." 

Behrens was the opposite. 

"1 wasn't really concerned 
with the karat size," he said. "1 
wanted something modest so the 
other 3 C's were important. 1 re 
ally wanted a quality diamond" 

Once the ring is purchased 
and given, it is important to care 
for it, Haar said The settings and 
prongs should be checked about 
every six months by a jeweler that 
sets stones G Thomas Jewelers 
offers the service free of charge. 

"I would suggest going to a 
jewelry store that has their own 
in -store jewelers," he said. 



Warmer weather means breaking the rules for brides 



~ By Christina Hanttrt 

— KANSAS STATE ffluIGLW 

Summer weddings come with 
warmer weather, and often a 
more laid-back atmosphere 

So it comes as no surprise that 
the season's most popular gowns 
are light, breezy, whimsical and 
often stray away from traditional 
fare. 

Sarah Boggs, manager of Cele- 
brations of the Heart on Poyntt 
Avenue, said summer wedding 
dresses come in a variety of styles 



and lengths. 

"Strapless dresses still seem to 
be the thing" she said "Asymmet- 
rically draped waistlines with 
pleating are also very popular 
The trend is definitely going more 
toward fitted shapes" 

Tea length gowns for both 
brides and bridesmaids are also 
popular this season 

"Sweet, chic and so easy to 
move in, these have a different 
glamour than their longer coun- 
terparts," according to the April 
2005 issue of Lucky Magazine. 



While white is still the norm 
(or most wedding gowns, color is 
another emerging trend that 
many brides have embraced. 

"There has been lots of pink, 
champagne and a new color 
called oyster - even some light 
blues" Boggs said 

While bridal gowns usually 
come from a palette of earth 
tones, bright colors are popular 
for bridesmaids' dresses. 

"We see tots of floral patterns 
and polka dots," said Melanie 
G ruber, sales associate at Cele- 



brations of the Heart 

Summer's strapless cuts and 
low necklines make many brides- 
maids uneasy standing in front of 
a crowd. 

The best advice for choosing 
summer wedding gowns is to 
look for fashions that are cool 
and comfortable 

The church's air conditioning 
may break down, or the outdoor 
reception may be swelteringly 
hot, but the bride and her party 
should provide a breath of fresh 
air for all in attendance. 



Couples should plan 
to prevent arguments 



ByMaUtsaBatar 

KANSAS STATKatlGIAN 

The financial stress of a new 
marriage can turn wedded bliss 
into a true nightmare 

Couples should discuss all 
major issues before marriage, 
but few topics will have as great 
an impact or cause as much 
conflict as financial disagree- 
ments said Scott Hendrix, fi- 
nance instructor 

"Studies have shown diat the 
main thing couples argue about 
is money, and it can be a consis- 
tent source of trouble for mar 
ried couples of any age," Hen- 
drix said "Money is a resource 
It should solve problems, not 
create them." 

Hendrix suggests couples 
communicate about the various 
goals they each have and try to 
come up with common goals 
they'll try to accomplish togeth- 
er. Once a plan is in place, fi- 
nances shouldn't be as great a 
source of conflict in the future 

Nate Sapp, worship leader 
for Christian Challenge and 
newlywed, said planning a life 
together is about constant com- 
munication and finances play 
an important role. 

"We have to talk about it all 
the time," Sapp said "I think if 
people come from different 
places, then different things are 
normal Figuring out what's 
normal for you as a couple is 
necessary" 

Different spending habits or 
poor planning could cause a 



couple to cany a credit card 
balance, which could haunt 
their financial future, Hendrix 
said. 

Many couples open a joint 
checking account when they get 
married, which Hendrix said is 
a personal decision, but not al- 
ways wise 

"My inclination is to keep 
separate accounts because each 
individual is going to want to 
have a separate financial histo- 
ry," Hendrix said 

Similarly, when one party is 
worth more than the other, or 
stands to inherit a large sum, a 
pre nuptial agreement may be 
the most sensible choice, Hen- 
drix said. 

As soon as it's financially 
reasonable, couples should buy 
a home, which is always a good 
investment, Hendrix said 

Also, when couples decide 
they'd like to have children, they 
should start a college fund im- 
mediately 

With those funds, couples 
should also discuss retirement 
plans because college gradua- 
tion and retirement often fall 
within a few years of each other. 

Regardless, communication 
and proper planning will allow 
couples to handle any financial 
burdens they might encounter 
together 

"Just talk it out before you 
get engaged," Hendrix said. 
"You've talked about everything 
else you have in common Make 
sure you have financial goals 
and habits in common as well." 



CLASH OF THE COLUMNISTS 



Living together before marriage 



Cohabitation makes marriage easier in the 
long run; test trial for the actual thing 




MATTHEW GIRARD 



My wife and I have been to- 
gether now for almost four 
years Of those four 
yea"rs, we were L-n 
gaged to be mar- 
ried for a little 
more than a 
yeat and 
i half, 
have been 
married for seven months and 
have lived in the same house- 
hold the entire time 

That's right, we cohabited 
before we tied the knot, and 1 
wuyldn't have done it any dif- 
fefcBitly 

jjltlmugh several studies 
h*n* shown couples who live 
icjjjcV' r before marriage are 
twice a. likely to divorce, there 
are a number of reasons why 
living with the person you are 
going to spend Ibe rest of your 
hfc with is beneficial 

The benefit of cohabitation 
before marriage is seeing how 
your future mate lives 

It might sound petty, but 
cleanliness is an important fac- 
tor when living with someone. 

Jes, you can often tell how 
elfish a person lives by just 
looking at their apartment or 
bedroom, but when you don 'I 
liv» there it's not your prob- 
ledL 

.Whether the person is too 
messy or too clean, it's an ad- 
justment actually living in that 
environment I know at my 
hopse, doing the dishes, taking 
out/the trash and picking up 
tha house were always a 
so&rce of irritation for me and 
my wife 

jfow that we have lived to- 



gether, we have developed a 
system to the house -cleaning 
chores, and it is one less thing 
we have to worry about when 
it comes working on our mar- 
riage, 

Another benefit to cohabit a 
tion is sleeping together 

Not sex, you perverts, physi 
cully sleeping in the same bed 
together This could very well 
be one of the biggest adjust 
ments couples have to make 

When you only have one 
bed to share, sleeping habits 
can be a crucial factor in de- 
termining how comfortable 
you are with your mate 

Getting the covers 
stolen from you or not 
being able to fall asleep 
because your arm is sit- 
uated funny is cute and 
an acceptable sacrifice 
at first, but after awhile 
the cuteness wears off 
and you just want to go 
to sleep. 

Changing or adjusting 
your sleeping habits take a 
long time to get used to. 

The major benefit of liv- 
ing together before marriage 
is Teaming to work as a un it- 
Ill let my wife take this 
one. 

"It's beneficial because you 
get the chance to build a more 
solid friendship with the per- 
son who you are going to 
marry." 

Thanks, babe 

Anyway, 1 know you have 
the rest of your life to figure all 
this stuff out, but why not get a 
head start on it and put all 
your effort into the important 




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Waiting until after the wedding to live 
together creates a more stable relationship 



I've teamed a lot in my first 
year uf marriage. 

For instance, I learned my 
wife has 1 ,572 pairs of shoes, 
and at least one of every pair 
will find its way onto the 
stairs at some 




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point each week. 

I also learned that 1 have a 
bad habit of leaving 
dishes in the living 
room, women shed 
a lot, someone 
should take out 
the trash oc- 
casionally JAMES HURL A 
and not 

everyone enjoys the same air 
temperature while they sleep 

All that, and I'm a slow 
learner. 

I'm grateful my wife, Laura, 
and 1 didn't live together until 
after we were married 
When living in close quar- 
ters with someone, situa- 
tions can escalate 
quickly 

Without the sacred 
bond of marriage, it's 
hard to say whether a 
still -plugged -in curling 
iron or dryer shrunken 
blouse could end up 
with one of the part- 
ners on the curb 

Not that this would 
happen, of course, if 
tin 1 couple felt truly 
connected and 
were serious 
about marriage 
But that's 
why the 
standard rca- 
^ sons for cohabi 

tauon are irrele 
vanl. If you are in 
love with someone 
enough to seriously 
consider marriage, whether they 
leave the cap off the toothpaste 
should not be the deciding fac- 
tor for whether to invest in wed- 



ding rings 

Cohabitation is not a "test 
driveT as Matt Girard says. Your 
future spouse is not a motor ve- 
hicle who needs proper mainte- 
nance, insurance and monthly 
payments. 

Not unless you get divorced. 

And divorce is a more likely 
outcome for couples who Live 
together before marriage A re- 
cent study showed they were 
40-80 percent more likely to get 
divorced than couples wlm 
waited until marriage to live to- 
gether 

But I realize cohabitation 
might be the best option for 
some, and statistics rarely speak 
to specific situations Matt and 
his wife. Jenn, are wonderful 
people, and their situation 
seemed lo ireat them well, as 
they are very happily married. 

For Laura and me, though, 
the experience of learning inti- 
mate details about one another 
- tike how much time one 
spends in the bathroom on a 
given trip - has been an exciting 
and interesting part of the new 
lywcd experience 

There are numerous moral, 
social and PtUoOl reasons I 
did not live with my wife before 
we were married 

But the decision was a mutu- 
al one, and neither of us has felt 
a shred of regret (or making it- 
Living together will he I 
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Page 12 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Friday, May 6, 2005 




lumping Jack, junior in jounulkm, htadi hid 
due to t mouthful of food. 



UndMy Biuman | COtlttlAN 
to hli tree to rn)oy hh lunch break. When asked what he was eating, Jadi bUed to comment 



Squirrels entertain students 



By Lmim Sulien 

KANSAS STATE COWMAN 

K-Stale can get a little squir- 
rely when the weather gets 
warmer. 

Several hundred squirrels 
come out of iheir winter homes 
during the spring to frolic on 
the campus grounds 

John Woods, director of fa- 
cilities services, said some- 
times the squirrels' activity 
seems peculiar 

"1 was on the east side of 
Nichols Hall the other day, and 
there were eight squirrels in a 
50-foot circle," he said. 

Woods said the squirrels are 
often entertaining. 

"1 think it's nice watching 
them run around and doing 
their antics, chasing each other 
and looking for food," he said 

However the squirrels also 
cause problems on campus, 
Woods said. 

"They get in the flower beds 
at times," he said. "They go in 
and they dig their little holes 
and they eat some of the flow- 
ers and the plants." 

Woods said there are so 
many squirrels on campus be- 
cause they have an abundance 
of food. 

"There's lots of food that 
they eat like acorns and nuts 
and stuff that are around." he 
said. 

People arc also offering 




UndMy B.uman | CQUfGUN 
igwrreHy Pants, senior in apparel design, hangs out while waiting for her dass to begin In 
lustin Hail. Pants said she couldn't believe how fast the semester had gone but was ready for 
summer to begin. 



food to the squirrels, Woods 
said. 

"There is an abundance of 
squirrels right outside of Burt 
Hall in the plaza area by Card 
well Hall, so somebody is feed 
ing them there," he said. 

Woods said he woul 1 prefer 
that people not feed the squir- 
rels since it increases the 
amount of squirrels on cam- 
pus. 

In the past, there have been 
attempts to decrease the squir- 
rel population on campus 

"We have trapped them in 
the past and taken them off of 
campus," he said. 

Despite attempts to reduce 



the number of squirrels, they 
keep coming back, Woods said. 
"They just fill in where we 
took the other ones away," he 
said 



Web sites give students 
alternatives for returning books 

M 



By Adam Hanks 

KANSAS SIME COUEfiiAN 

About a year ago, Patrick 
Nagle and Will DeSantis were 
waiting in line to sell back 
their textbooks at Towson 
University, when Patrick saw 
a girl who had a book he 
needed for the upcoming se- 
mester. He was able to trade 
her texts, bypassing the book- 
store all together. 

At that moment, Switch- 
textbooks com was born. 

Switclitextbooks.com is 
just one of many Web sites 
dedicated to giving students 
an alternative source, other 
than college bookstores, for 
their text books. But unlike 
some book exchange Web 
sites, Swttchtextbooks.com is 
more then just a "bulletin 
board" for them to post used 
books, said Nagle, the Presi- 
dent and CEO of the Web 
site. 

A student submits their 
book, which is assigned a 
point value that depends on 
the demand for the book, its 
quality and market value. 
The book is then entered into 
the sites network. When an- 
other student needs the same 
book, they search the data- 
base, select which book they 
want, and an e-mail is sent to 
the student with the book, 
who mails it to the other stu- 
dent 

After the transaction is 
complete, the student giving 
the book is awarded the 



amount of points the book 
was worth, and the student 
who will receive the book 
will be debited the same 
amount. 

"It's like a combination of 
eBay, Netflix and Kazaa," said 
DeSantis, the vice president 
of the Web site. 

The only costs associated 
with the Web site is a one 
time $19.95 member fee, and 
the cost of postage for mail- 
ing books. However, com- 
pared to the cost of a new 
textbook, DeSantis said he 
feels this is a great deal. 

"Our goal is to satisfy as 
many students as possible and 
get them at least one textbook 
each semester," DeSantis said. 
"That's our goal, because 
once you get that book, 
you've got your money back." 

With most Web sites, prob- 
lems would arise if no stu- 
dents had the book another 
student needed. However, 
Switchtextbooks.com works 
through another book distrib- 
utor. If you have points in 
your account from giving 
textbooks, they will send you 
the book, deducting the nec- 
essary amount from the stu- 
dent's account 

Though it may be able to 
save students money, Steve 
Levin, the Union Bookstore 
manager, said there are many 
risks involved. 

"When you are a buyer, 
you don't know what you 
need right now, and if you're 
the seller, you don't know 



what they're going to need, 
but you want to sell it right 
now," he said. 

Levin said one of the ad 
vantages of using the Union 
Bookstore or Varney's Book- 
store is that students are able 
to get money now for selling 
their books, or can get the 
right book, guaranteed 

However, Nagle and De- 
Santis both said they believe 
the community-like network 
of students they have estab- 
lished is more than reliable. 

"We've established a self- 
governing system similar ty 
eBay where we take feedback 
about traders seriously,* 
Nagle said. 

Even though it has been up 
and running for about a 
month, Switchtextbooks.com 
already has around 843 trial 
members who have posted 
books but not paid the mem- 
bership fee, and 126 active 
members, who have paid the 
fee, and the number is on the. 
rise, DeSantis said The Web 
site has more than 15 million 
books to offer students, arid 
they estimate that they 
are able to save users from 
$350 to $375 a semester on 
books 

"Our main goal is to satis- 
fy our consumers. We're real- 
ly aiming at trying to give our 
students a choice," DeSantis 
said "We were in school just 
last year and it became so 
tiresome, so we decided wc 
were going to do something 
about it." 



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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 13 



KEMP | Murder suspect confessed to detectives 



Continued from Page 1 

found her that afternoon with 
a pool cover over her body. 
Appleby was among by- 
standers at the crime scene, 
whose names were gathered as 
possible witnesses. 

"A tape of Appleby's confes- 
sion is being considered for ad- 
mittance as evidence during 
the trial, which has not been 
scheduled He will appear in 
Court Aug. 15 for a preliminary 
rrearing. 

Appleby's arrest and court 
appearance didn't bring the 
closure that Kemp's friends arc 
desperately waiting for. 

"Someday there will be clo- 
sure," Prieb said. "It's opened 
the whole thing up A lot of us 
h!(d gone through the whole 
grieving process and got to the 
happy stage when we can't 



think about her. As soon as 
they found him. it was a great 
feeling, but it brought back the 
memories." 

On Wednesday, Kemp's 
pledge class at Pi Beta Phi 
sorority read letters they wrote 
to themselves during their 
freshman year 

"We made a lime capsule 
when we were freshmen before 
we were initiated, and every 
one wrote a letter to our 
selves," said Mollie Cole, se- 
nior in family studies and 
human services. "Hers was typ- 
ical Ali It started out 'Hey me, 
what's up?' It made us laugh" 

Prieb said it was a time of 
celebration for seniors but 
there was obviously someone 
missing 

"All of our senior stuff re 
minded us that she definitely is 
still part of us, even if she's not 



able to actually be here with 
us," she said. "We always feel 
like senior time is a time to be 
together, but we are actually 
missing one of us." 

Prieb said the Kemp family 
has been on everyone's minds 
with the excitement of gradua- 
tion 

"It's still celebrating, but 
you think of her parents, and 
we are all thinking of her par- 
ents We know they arc happy 
for us graduating, but they 
never got to see Ali graduate. 
They will never gel to see her 
walk across and see her grow 
up." 

Cole, who will also graduate 
next week, said the experience 
has changed her perspective. 

"11 just kind of opens your 
eyes to a whole new world," 
she said. "It makes you appre- 
ciate life" 



INVITATIONAL I Jumpers ranked best in nation 



Continued from Page 6 

point, and you usually will sec 
some pretty good murks." 
'Two Wildcat jumpers enter 
the weekend ranked in the top 
two in the nation in their re- 
spective events: junior Kyle 
Lancaster (1st, high jump) and 
senior Chaytan Hill (2nd, 
triple jump) 

Both athletes are also 
ranked in the top 50 in the 
world, according to the Inter- 
national Association of Athlet- 
ics Federation 

Hill, a team captain from 
Kirby, Texas, received the 
^ejyl and Fern Switzer Cam 
M Leadership Award at the 
Ninth Annual Student Athlete 
Recognition Banquet on Mon 
<Hy, three days after she won 
tfce triple jump at the 96th An* 
Drake Relays in Des 



Moines, Iowa. 

Hill will compete in the 
long jump on Saturday and 
said she likes competing at 
Nebraska because of her past 
success there. 

"I tike jumping there be 
cause I was there the first time 
I ever jumped 44 09," Hill 
said "1 have never really done 
badly there, and I am looking 
forward to jumping there" 

Lancaster, a four-time 
NCAA All-American from 
Port Scott, Kan., set a school 
record with a 7 07 high jump 
at the UTEP Springtime Clas 
sic April 2 in El Paso, Texas 

"If you told me I would be 
ranked this high at the begin- 
ning of the season, I probably 
would have just laughed," Lan 
caster said "1 struggled quite a 
bit in the indoor season I 
knew I was capable of (jump- 



ing 7-07), but 1 did not expect 
it this fast" 

Lancaster said he has mixed 
emotions about competing at 
Nebraska. 

I jumped well the first time 
1 jumped there, but I had a 
horrible meet the second time 
I jumped there," he said "I am 
gmng to try to block out the 
bad experience" 

As renovations are complet- 
ed on K-Stale'ji R .V. Christian 
Track Complex and the con- 
ference meet nears, Lancaster 
said he is becoming more anx 
ious. 

"I was kind of worried at 
the beginning of the year, and 
I thought, 'Oh my gosh, it is 
going to be embarrassing host 
ing a meet here,'" he said. "But 
it is getting done, and I am ex- 
cited about competing in front 
of the hometown crowd " 



GRADUATION | Officials plan for protests, crowds 




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O pie" -HM. Srhnffff^ O 

JjL mary and ruby_ 

we thank you for all your love and support each day ttf delta Di 

^^ women 



Manhattan's Biggest Annual 
Wine Sale! 




Beer and Spirits on 
sale as well! 

1 338 Westloop 
5399441 



BIG 12 TRACK AND 
O UTDOOR CHAMPION ! 

May 13-15 
RV Christian Trad 

( just west of Bramlage Coliseum 



dii; i? coNriRiHci 



For an c edule and more information 

go to www.k-statesports.com 



Continued from Page 1 

process, a good transition from 
one ceremony to another," 
Mn lit i said. "We've got it 
down to a very fine science." 

This year's ceremonies also 
fail on the same day as the Big 
1 2 Outdoor Championship 
track meet and a home base- 
ball game against Northern 
Colorado 

Mullcr said there might be 
some minor inconveniences 
with all the events happening 
on (he same day but should be 
barely noticeable. 

"Sometimes we do have ad 
ditional challenges," he said 
"We're also going to be hosting 
the Big 12 outdoor track meet 
and baseball That gives us 
some additional challenge We 
planned and organized things 
so that we can accommodate " 

Organizing and setting up 



the areas for commencement 
are not the only behind-the- 
scenes activities happening be- 
fore graduation 

Beth Unger. vice provost for 
academic services and tech- 
nology, said getting ready for 
graduation is a semester- long 
process 

"Early in the semester we 
have to notify everybody that 
is going to graduate that they 
have to apply for graduation 
and that there is a graduation 
fee" Unger said. "We have to 
order the programs, too. We 
have to put the programs to- 
gether and order them " 

She also said it is beneficial 
to know how many people are 
coming, especially grandpar- 
ents. Knowing this informa- 
tion allows the university to 
be ready to assist the people 
who may need help getting 
places, such as up the hill and 



into Bramlage. 

Another thing that is 
planned for are protesters who 
come to the commencement 
ceremonies. Unger said the 
people who come to protest at 
graduation have a place where 
they can be without interfering 
with the day's events. 

Overall, Unger said she en- 
joys seeing the families gather 
to celebrate graduation with 
their student. 

"The best part is seeing the 
families enjoy the students' ac- 
complishment" she said. "I 
think seeing them enjoy the 
accomplishments of the stu- 
dent is the joy of the whole 
thing." 

Mullcr said it was an impor- 
tant day for the university as 
well as the students and their 
families 

"It's a day for us to honor 
our students," Mullcr said. 



COLUMN I Prairie chickens should be new mascot 



Continued from Page 6 

jersey market, use orange as 
I he- dominant color with white 
and brown accents. 

As for the dance team, what 
little girl wouldn't want to 
uruw up and become a " Chick - 



lette'" 

So, there ya go, KC I've 
taken care of the hard part, 
now all you have to do is con- 
vince some owner or wealthy 
wannabe owner to put a team 
in the Sprint Center. 

Oh by the way, if any of my 



ideas are used, you can make 
the check out to Matthew Gi- 
rard and Jesse Manning. 



MattMW €tnra is a smmc m prist 
Journalism Vm on e -mail Mm at 




JOU 



nana 







In the 

TEXTBOOK DEPARTMENT 

at the 

K-State Student Union 
Book Store 

■You don't need your receipt to tell your books! 
• if doesn't matter where the books were pure hosed! 
• Please bring your current photo ID to sell you books. 



Bookstore 



Wed May 4 ■ Sat May 7 

8:00am - 8:00pm 

Sunday May 8 

11:00am -7:00pm 

Mori May 9 - Frl May 13 

8:00am - 8:00pm 

532-6583 

www.ksubookstore.com 



■■« 



• ' 1 • , 






CLASSIFIEDS 



Page 14 



^^^^^^^^= 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



To pface an advertisement call 



Friday, May 6, 2005 



till ■ ■ 

I i ■ u 



I I I I 

n ■ i ■ 



ii 1 1 i ■ 



LET'S RENT 



110) 
For Rent- 
Apt 
Unlumtsht 



NOW LEASING 
FOR FALL 




For Renl- 
Apls Furnished 

■ I i APARTMENTS 
On* Mock from campus 
Ample pulling quiet condi- 
tions Furnished or unfur- 
nished Jure and August 
■ 

110 

For Rent 
Apt 

Unfuri 



$500 Large two-bedroom. 

Dishwasher d lipoid I cen- 
tial aii June I. Pals ok 
(7351317-7713 

$975/ MONTH Earty Bird 
discount oflert rour-oad- 
room, two and one halt bath 
town home with washer/ 
dryer provided Call 
(735)537-21 1 1 

1026 BLUEMONT On* 
and two-bedroom June 1 
{785)317-7713 

II 12 BLUEMONT on* 
Mock to campus, two-bed- 
room available August 1 
(785)776-9288 ot 1785)776- 
0683 

1126 BLUEMONT feudal 

apartments with all bills 
paid Neutral colors with 
nio* carpets Overlooking 
Aggienlle with off-street 
parking Save on parking 
permits and walk to campus 
Available June 1 No pets. 
(785)31 3-4812. 

1215 PONYTZ- One-bed- 
room basement apartment 
with neutral colors and hid 
sue windows Large walk-in 
closet All hills paid S4?5 
August No pets (785)313- 
4812 

1219 KEARNEY Two-bed 
room August, year lease 
No pels. Water' I rash paid 
Across street I torn campus 
$850.1785)539-5136 

1844 ANDERSON, new 
construction, three -bed 
room, Iwo bath, personal 
washer/ dryer, high-speed 
internet, available June 1 
(785)554-3456 or (7B5|565- 
1310 

350 N 16th. a block to cam 
pus, two -bedroom apart 
mam, central- ait. dishwash- 
er. No pets. August ttvough 
December five month 
lease. $570' month 
(785)saM>S4». 

360 N T6th A block to cam 
pus. Five minute walk to On 
ion or AogtevtSe Two bed 
room apartments Skj bed- 
rooms central air, dish- 
washei Wisher/ dryer on 
Site First month rent Ire* 
August lease Call lor excit- 
ing details (785)539.5508 
No cats or dogs 

S11 BLUEMONT two-bed- 
room base men l. new 
range laundry no pets 
June or August $430 ptus 
utilities (785)313-0462 

629 VATTIER- Two-bed- 
room spacious apartment, 
laundry facilities Water/ 
trash paid One yeai teas* 
August 1 $430, (785)539- 
B7fM 

814 THURSTON. Two-bed- 
room, June year lease No 
pels Water/ trash paid 
$800.(715)539-5136- 

•15 Ft A TONE One-bed- 
room downstairs $425 817 
Keerney. one ot two-bed- 
room upstairs, $425 820 
Colorado, basement effi- 
ciency, $275 No pets Au- 
fluSt (785)776-8548 

91 1 Sunset tour-bedroom. 
One block to campus, 
washer/ dryer provided 
Available August 1 
(7851776-9288 or (785)776- 
0883 

A ONE BEDROOM June 
1. t704 Fairview 1100 
Kearney (7BS)317-77I3 

A TWO-BCOROOM. nice 
larg* dishwasher, central 
Mr One year or 6 month 
lease (785)3t7 7713 

BLOCK TO CAMPUS: Spa- 
cious two-badroom No 
pets Water and trash fur- 
nished (7aS)63»45*8 



CRESTWOOO APART 
MENTS West side two- 
bodroom. one and one -hall 
baths Personal washer/ 
dryer fireplace, pool Water, 
trash, cable paid No pets 
$670- $670 (788)776-3345. 
trealwoQd- apartment*, oom 

HOflSE LOVERS, two bed 

room home Close 10 town, 
includes room lor two hors- 
a", (785)537-8718, 

NEW 12-PLEX available 
June. Two-bedroom, luiiury 
apartments 1010 Bluomont. 
two ADA friendly $800 
$825/ month (785)778-2102 
or I7B5JS56-2014 No pets 

NEW DUPLEX, three-bed 
room Central heal/ air, 
washer/ dryer hook-up, dish- 
washer. oH-streel parking, 
Iwo lull baths, water and 
trash paid Don I miss this 
one 1 (785)34 1 -2921 oi 
(78S)77B-3216. 

NICE ONE BEDROOM qui 
.1 a ilk lo campus Across 
trom Aggrevllle For June 
and July, less* hall price 
(785)317-5178 

ONE . TWO, three, tour-bad- 
loom apartments and hous- 
es June and August 
lease* No pels Call 
(785|539 1975, (785)313- 
8298 

ONE AND two-bedrooms 

Walk to campus, covered 
parking. June i and Aug 1 
leases, very nee! (785)341- 



TWO BEDROOM APART- 
MENTS Avertable June. Ju- 
ly and August 1 1 14 Ber- 
trand ($580). 1200 Fremont 
($600- $840), 701 N 9th 
($500- $550), 2014 Sealon 
($530). 533 More ($530), 
363 N t4th ($520- 600) 
www.rant-apm.com, 
(785)5394357. 

TWO BEDnQOM. ONE 
bath Close to campus 
1828 Anderson Watei and 
trash paid (788)341-4498. 

WALK TO CAMPUS Spa- 
cious two-bedroom apart 
menls. kits of windows, qui 
el conditions, amp* park 
ing, lurnlshed or unlumish 
ed, washer/ dryei m apart 
mem. reasonable rant 
June and August No pets 
786)539-3638 



ONE-BEDROOM AND Stu 

dlo apa rtm en t* . One-bed- 
room. $280/ month Studio 
$260/ month All utilities ex 
cept electric paid Lease 
and deposit required Avail- 
abiB June 1 (785)S37-7794. 

ONE -BEDROOM APART 
MINI close lo campus 
1030 Kearney July/ August 
lease available No pets, 
trash paid Call Aaron 
1816)729-6942 

OMEBEDROOM apart- 
ment. 1225 Claflln $415/ 
month plus deposit No pels 
1 785)456-281 2 

ONE-BEDROOM apart- 
ment Gas/ water/ trash 
paid Laundry facilities One 
year lease June 1 , $380,00. 
(766)538-670*. 

ONE-BEDROOM APART - 

MENTS, many close lo 
campus with washer/ dryer 
No pels Call (785)341 -1950 

OI [785)341 3365 

ONEBEDROOM NEXT to 
campus. Trash and water 
included Available June 1 
or August 1 (785)313-7473 

ONE-BEDROOM WITH 
neutral colors for August 
Across from CHy Park with 
off-street parking Local 
landlords who care and 
maintain the property Wa- 
ter/ lr**h paid. No pets 
1785)3134812 

ONE-BEDROOM. AVAILA- 
BLE August Close to cam- 
pus Water/ trash paid Cerv- 
tralair (788)837-7810. 

ONE-BEDROOM TWO 
blocks lo campus and Ag- 
gieviile W**h*r/ dryer 
PWSQk (785)317 7713 

PRE. LEASING JUNE and 
August Soma units brand 
to KSU washer/ 
Call for de- 
tails (785)778-2102 ot 
(785)556-2014 No pels 

THREE BEDROOM ADJA 
CENT to campus All major 
appliances, off-street park- 
ing, water and trash paid 

(785)564 in/ 

THREE-BEDROOM CLOSE 
lo campus Central air, 
dishwasher, laundry lacili- 
ties No pets (785)539- 

om 



TWO AND 
rooms Close to campus 
B pa aou a, dishwasher, cen- 
tral air, laundry tactttte* No 
pets (Twyt&jmt 

Two-bedroom apartments 
many close to campus with 
washer/ dryer No pats Call 
(785)341 1950 or (7851341- 

TWO BEDROOM/ ONE 

bathroom. Nice old home 
near perk and campus, wa- 
ter/ trash paid, pets, Aug 
1 (913)219-4482 




$1000 FOUR BEDROOM. 2 
ball' duplei Only tour 
yean oM. Good sued bad- 
rooms June Emerald Prop- 
erty Management (785)556- 



$1200 TWO years old. 
Four big bedrooms, three 
bath Great place- you'll love 
it Washer and dryer Ga- 
rage No pels August 
Emerald Property Manage- 
men! [785)556-6899 

$1200: FOUR-BEDROOM, 
TWO bathroom duplex, 
three blocks from campus 
and Aggieville One year 
ok), available August 1 Call 
Brian al(7BS 1845-8112 

$436 TWO-BEDROOM du- 
plex with central air and 
washer/ dryer August 
Emerald Property Manage- 
ment [785)5564899 

1733 KENMAR. A GREAT 
yard tot barbecues and 
tun. Spacious house Three, 
four-bedrooms All applian- 
ces Close lo stadium 
Please ceJ (785)539- 1 1 77 

725 MOFtO. Nice four-bed- 
room, near campus, Aggie 
win*)- Large detached ga- 
rage, washer/ dryer, dish- 
washer $10007 month, 
Available Jun* 1 (913)710- 
4730 

912 LARAMIE Five bed- 
room house, dose lo cam- 
pus Washer/ dryer, central 
aii, fenced yard Pets okay 
June 1 (7BS)317-7713 Or 
1 7BS 1539-1713 

A CLOSE Sis or flv*-b*d- 
room two bam, central air 
Dishwasher, washer, dryer, 
pets okay June I. 
(786)317 7713 

CUTE THREE BEDROOM 
two bath house lor rent 
One mil* west ot KSU $825 
plus utilities 1785)317-6464 

FOR RENT: Three-bed 
loom, two bath new home 
Washer/ dryer Garage 
Available June 1 Gr**l Val- 
u*. (620)532-1775. 

FOUR-BEDROOM HOUS 
ES. duplexes, spsflments 
Next to campus, central air, 
off street parking, tree 
washer/ dryer Fall leases 
No pets (7*8)837-7050. 

FOUR BEDROOM. TWO 
and one-halt bath at $9757 
month (785)537-2111 or 

century? lKJilghLcpm 

FOUH-BEDROOM IWO 
bath duplex 1410 Houston, 
half mil* from campus, laun- 
dry, single property landlord 
No smoking, no pel* 
$1150/ month, August 1 
(785)776-9260 

FOUR-BEDROOM. TWO 
bath boos* Washer/ dryer, 
grsal location. Spacious in- 
terior Some pets okay Aug. 
1 teas* (813)983-7422 



LOOK! BRAND NEW 
HOUSE! Four-bedroom, Iwo 
bath Washer/ dryer. refriger- 
ator, central air One-nan 
mile 10 campus. August 
lease $1400/ month Under 
construction 1614 Pierre 
(785)304 0387. (765)776- 
9124 

MOVE IN Now. 1019 Hous- 
ton Three-bedroom with 
day room upstairs Kitchen 
appliances Near City Park, 
downtown, and Aggieville 
$645. (417)823-9480 

NEAR AGGIEVILLE foul 
bedroom house, central all 
COndJObning, ott-slreet park 
iny. $1000 pei month plus 
utilities (785)537-8070 

NEXT TO campus Two 

and tour-bedrooms, houses 
duplexes. Washer/ dryer, 
central air No pets Fail 
leases (765)537-7050. 

NICE HOUSES for rent 

Three, lour, live and eight 
bedrooms Close to cam- 
pus June. July and August 
leases Call CM (620)242 
7823 

ONE-BEDROOM HOUSE 
do** to campus 1010 N 
11th street No pets, trash 
paid, summer lease availa- 
ble Call Aaron (816)729- 
6942 

REDUCED RENT Four bed- 
room, two bath houses 
Three houses available Ail 
are nice single family homes 
with central air Washer/ 
dryer and dishwasher in- 
cluded (719)3134873. 

rent-apm.com! NOW 

leasing houses, apart- 
ments and duplexes Avail- 
able now June, July , and 
Augusi www rentapm com 

(785)539-4357 

THREE, FOUR, flve-bed- 
room houses Close lo 
campus Ofl street parking 
Washer/ dry or June and 
Augusi leases (785)449- 
2161 

THREE-BEDROOM AVAIL 
ABLE Jun* Close lo cam- 
pus Fenced yard Pets on 
approval (785)537-7818 

THREE-BEDROOM BT£ 
PLEX. Available June 

Trash and mowing paid 
Central air Washer/ dryer 
(765)537.7910 

THREE-BEDROOM 
HOUSE, 1516 Campus. 
$900/ month Close lo Vet 
Med Teaching Hospital 
June lease (720)733-1659 
m 7.00pm 



FOUR-BE I TOOM. TWO 

bath larg* louse. Close to 
campus Washer, dryer. 
tUsbwasltur. a* $250 each 
parson (786)778-2100 

NEW US TING: Available 
soon. Three-bedroom, two 
bath Large living room, 
gam* room, computer room. 
Located at 918 Bertrand 
washer/ dryer, central air, 
yard, Iron! porch (785)530- 
3872 




FEMALE HOUSEMATE. No 
drinking/ smoking. $27$/ 
month. One-third utilities, 
washer, dryer. August 
tease. am.lca313#ksu.*du 
or (785)537-1464. 

GUVS SHARE s house. 
$3007 month and share utilit- 
ies. Close to City Park After 
6 pm, ca 11(785)456- <i 109 

MALE WANTED Three- 
bedroom, washer/ dryer, 
central air. July lease $300/ 
month one-third utilities 
(785)392-4656 



FOUR-BEDROOM AT 1521 
Leavenworth St. $980, air. 
utilities paid. June occupan- 
cy (785)539-8401 




THREE-BEDROOM 

HOUSE, 3500 Chippewa 
Circle W* staid* Large, 
COm*r lot. Available June 
or July Call (7851539-1975. 
(785)3134298 

THREE-BEDROOM 

HOUSE. iow*r level Three 
blocks east ot campus 
Available Jun* 1 or Augusi 
1 Ott-street parking One 
bed or al (785)5564098 or 
(785)457-3478 

THREE-BEDROOM 
HOUSE June/ August avail- 
able $1200 elecinc/ gas/ 
water/ irash paid Washer/ 
dryer shared with basement 
(785)34 1-6807. 

THREE-BEDROOM HOUS- 
ES and apartments June 
and August Is si si Close to 
campus No pets (785)539- 
1975 or (7851313-8296 

THREE BEDROOM HOUS- 
ES and apartments starting 
at $760- $1100 Close to 
campus Jun* and August 
toast* No pets (786)539- 
1975 or (785)313-8298 

THREE BEDROOM, ONE 
bath 730 Pottawatomie 
Washer/ dryer, fridge, stove, 
dishwasher, central air One 
car garage arlth big back- 
yard. $625/ month, 
(785)207-0212. 

TWOBEDROOM. $550 
Three-bedroom. $750 

ctos* to campus Washer/ 
dryer, central air (785)776- 
2100. 



1 1 09 Kearney A Block to 
campus Two- bedroom 

apartment, washer/ dryer 
$479 ell bills paid. Two 
month tease June and July 
No pets (785)317-3021 

ALL BILLS paid, four bed 
room, two bath. pool, inter- 
net, washer/ dryer As soon 
as possible Contact Devon 

(913)406-7236 

APARTMENT FOR sum- 
mer sub leas*. Nice Iwo 
bedroom apartment Quiet 
localion 1900. Call 
(785)776-9009 

BOY OR girl $250/ month 
Fail 2005 Spring 2006 
1725 Anderson across the 
street from the Alumni Ceri- 
ler Call Zack Clear 
(913)244-6473. 

FEMALE SUBLEASERS 
wanted June and July 
Four-bedroom house, clean 
and spacious 61 8 Kearney 
Available mid-May 
(785)341-6022 

FURNISHED, ACROSS the 
alreal from campus al 1729 
Anderson Four -bedroom 
female only Irash paid 
please call (785)539-9638 

HOUSE THREE BED 
ROOMS available lor sum 
mer sublease Big house 
and bedrooms, good loca- 
tion (926 Laramie) Aw-con- 
ditioning. furnished, great 
roommate Rant negotia- 
ble !! 620) 35 3 - 8526 . 
[785)770-3457 

LARGE TWO-BEDROOM 

two bath available June 1 - 
July 29. Apartment complex 
is Campus East located at 
Cteltln and McCain Lane 
Has poof, balcony, fireplace, 
dishwasher, and microwave 
Pels allowed Close lo 
campus and AggteviHe. Rent 
is $265/ roommate or $530/ 
month (765)341-9257 

ONE-BEDROOM SUB- 
LEASE j i "J three-bedroom 
sublease availabe for June 
and July Emerald Property 
Management (785I5S6- 
6899 

ROOM AVAILABLE In lour 
bedroom apartment May 
July 31 Close to campus, 
large rooms Rent $215 (ne- 
gotiable) plus cheap ustbe*. 
May rent paid. (785)341- 
3535 

ROYAL TOWERS. Orvs- 
bsdmom. one bath $430/ 
month June- July Available 
mid May Dishwasher/ mi 
crowave Call Jesse 
(316)516-6097 

SUBLEASE CHASE Man- 
hattan Apartments, three 
bedroom, available June 1, 
tower level $780 per month 
(785)532 9961. 

SUBLEASER NEEDED 
two-bedroom, one bath, two 
blocks lo campus, one block 
to Aggieville Rent $860/ 
negotlebl* June.' July 
(785)5 394487 

SUMMER SUBLEASE One- 
bedroom In a Iwo- bedroom 
University Commons, mid- 
May through July $290 plus 
one- half utilities (785)564- 
0126. 

VERY NICE one bedroom 
by the maJ Washer/ dryer 
and dishwasher Available 
for summer Rent fiiaops- 
bf* CaH (768)770-2224 



WILDCAT 

PROPERTY 

MANAGEMENT 

mm 

l507Poyntz#l 
2 BD @ $525 
l509Poyntz#l 

I LG BD @ $525 
washer & dryer 

ALL BILLS PAID 
June or August 



•WtoHtUt 

•Mttmf 



•NewUtatofcraiUHe 

ERwTfJy- EWd«e* 



• lM«or*Wfe>C«r. 



TOWN 
HOMES 

J flJtn * f'uin k$L< 



1013-1025 McCollum 
2 Bedrooms 




715-537 7701 



NOW LEASING for Summer 
and Fall' Spacious one and 
two-bedrooms See display 
ad on this page. Westches- 
ler Park ■ 

ONE THREE AND tour- 
bedrooms No smoking, no 
dnnking. no pets (785)539- 

1554 

ONE. TWO. three and lour- 
bedroom apartments. Close 
lo campus and Aggktviae 
Dishwasher, laundry, and 
parking (785)537-6017 

ONE. TWO. three bed- 
rooms Available June and 
August (765)537-7136 ot 

i/B5]313-i?56 

ONE -BED ROOM AND stu- 
dios June i Pet* negoba- 
ble (785)539-9582. 

ONE-BEDROOMS AND stu- 
dios Close to campus 
Hii list** Jun* and August 
www ranl-apm com 
(785)5394357 




HAVE V0U 

minum hand true*? It has 



FOUND; EARRING on 
we* East ot Museum of Art 

•LEARN TO FLYT K-StaJ* VS?** " WWn » t 7 * 8 ' 4 * 8 
Flying Club ha* 8v* air- 
plane* and tow**i rat** 
Ctl (788)776-1744 

www kui sduflu*: 

CONGRATULATIONS 

GRADUATES from Cumn 
Property Company? Moving 
19 tw Kansas City an»? 
So* dkxptey ad on ttM pay* 
1t*» Woods o» Chsm ■*•»•• 8 waa slat used at 
m* K-BUAs Saudsnt Union, 
^^^^^^^__ IT* hanf lo do our Mw 

w, r T, ^l ■ is; Si «£o/2p£,T 

To swat a »H»T? w ^ : ™ w rm ** ■"™" 



turn ID (KSU, driver-* a. 
cena* or other) whan plac- 
ing a post a not* 



AfXft 

Manhattan City Ordinance 
4614 assure* «v*rv par- 
Mi 





■fan 

to th* Director of Human 
RMOurca* at City Hall, 
(7MWI! JM0. 



AMA/ING STUDIO W«h fire- 
On* block east ot 
•Is a*ow*di Con- 
tact Rachel al (317)753- 
1723. AvaMebte Jun* 1 

AVAILABLE AUGUST t 
Close to campus On*-b*d- 
room apartment (785)567- 

0620 

AVAILABLE JUNE t Four- 
bedroom dupktx. 500 Lava- 
mi* B. $286/ room, two 



OPEN HOUSE 

@ 
WILDCAT VILLAGE 

4 Large bedruonts 

Lifts wiUt-ln closet* 

1530 s' on t lewis 

LavaLorv In each bedroom 

TV ares ml wot bar 

ftfrldav 

Lots of outdoor space 

SUlnleai stMtl appliances 

full aim washer A dryer 

Sturm safe room 

Cable TV Included 

11300 per month 

I blocks North nf Kim ball 

on (kJJetr- Ave. 



OPi^N WED & FR1 

3-5 pm 

or call for 

appointment 

776-2426 or 666-3760 



PARK PLACE APART- 

MENTS. Hurrytl avalabikty 
limited One- two- Ihree- 
b*draoms (7W)»M-2M1 



msrtsigs and a labat Par- 
hap* iTi smmg in s *tor*ge 
area waatng for us to iw- 



you 



I panvig sjgn Veu tfw* — — - 
i ai* V**. t tMr* you ar* LOST 



FEUflfT 
r7lfS)317-34a6 



Call 





Can 



(786)4tM»1« 



THREE AND tour-bedrooms 
Auguat Ctoaa to 



Caniral air. eoin-operatad 
laundry (786)637 -76 to. 

•475, CLEAN, roomy Iwo- {7I6}B37^2BB, 

bsdroom. on* and ona-hraf jusxe, jijiy, August Now 
bath ki nineptai No pats k***lng one. two, three, four- 
0n*-v«»r teas* 3032 Ktn- oeeroom 
bs* (7S6I530-864U 



UNIVERSITY 
TERRACE APTS. 

iptacml&iiidnmAfti. 

y/aska/Dryrr 

atWtAtrfDrytrHodafi 

SfacvmGnmdi&Paot 

NoPtU 
1330 College Ave. 

CALL 537-2096 

9*.m.to6p.nx 



110 

For Rent- 
Apt. 

Unfurnished 



Three Bedrooms 
Near Campus 



1838 Anderson |780 

516IM)4thSi $750 

1225Rolone $735 

519NMonhatton $735 

10l9Fremonf $660 



Brookside Mgmf 
537-1746 



STUDIO APARTMENTS, 
829 Humboldt. $340. 1521 
Leavenworth $350. air. June 
occupancy, bills paid. 
(786)539-6401 

THREE -BEDROOM 
APARTMENT Very nice 
$810 June 1- Aug 1 Near 
Aggieville [735) 53? -2661 
THREE BEDROOM Al 815 
N 10th St S720, also 930 
Osage $735. utilities paid, 
June occupancy (785)539- 
8401 

TWO-BEDROOM APART- 
MENTS available. Close to 
campus and Aggieville Call 

(785)537 -2337 

TWOBEDROOM APART- 
MENTS, duplexes . and 
nouses. Several locations. 
Available June, July, and 
August wwwrent-apm.com. 
(785)539-4357 

TWOBEDROOM APART 
MENTS June 1 Washer/ 
dryer Pets negotiable 
(785)530.9562. 

TWOBEDROOM: CLOSE 
to campus Private balcony. 
Central air New carpet, 
dishwasher June 
(785)341-5070 

1201 



For Rent- 



BIG HOUSE Six-bedrooms, 
two kitchens, two baths, two 
Irving rooms Duplex three- 
bedroom All clean Good 
condition (785)537-2289 

DUPLEX LARGE tourbed- 
room. two and one-half bath 
near campus and Aggieville 
[ 765^537-6017 

FIVE AND six -bedroom 
houses (two kitchens) 
Available July and August 
Central air, washer/ dryei 
dishwasher, very nice. Pets 
negotiable (765)5.19 956J 

FIVE. SIX and seven bed 
room house (IWO- three 
kitchens) Available June, 
July, and August Several 
locations www rent 

apm com (785)538-4367 

FOUR AND liva-bedrooma 
Available June and August. 
(785)537-7138 or (785)313 
1256 

FOUR-BEDROOM HOUSE 
Washer/ dryer Nice large 
rooms Off -si reel parking 
(785)537 1568 

FOUH BEDROOM HOUS- 
ES and duplexes Several 
locations Available June, 
July, and August Pets al- 
lowed in most www rent- 
apmcom (785)539-4357 

FOUR-BEDROOM HOUS 
ES. duplexes, apartments 
Nad to campus, central air. 
off -street parking, tree 
w**h*r/ dryer. Fa# teases 

No pets (765)537-7050. 

FOUR-BEDROOM FOUR 
bathroom Brand new con- 
struction 1023 Laramie. 
Washer/ dryer, central air, 
dishwasher No pets. 
(785)539-9582 

FOUR- BEDROOM, TWO 
and one- ha II balh town 
horns $990 (785)537 0045 

FOUR-BEDROOM, TWO 
balh house 1715 Colorado 
Washer/ dryer and dish 
washer Available June, Ju- 
ly, or August $1200/ month 
.785)539 0991 

FOUR-BEDROOM, TWO 
bath, 818 Thurston, all appli- 
ance*, air -conditioning, 
laundry Clean, no pats Ofl 
street parking August lease, 
$1000 plus utilities 
(785)323-0081 

FOUR-BEDROOM, TWO 
blocks from campus 1538 
Harry. $1000/ month CaH 
1785)294-036? Or (785)336- 
0202 

FOUR-BEDROOM, TWO 

blocks west of campus 
2030 Co**p* Heights $275/ 
be d room Newly remodeled. 
Washer/ dryer, central heel, 
alt conditioner June t 
1785)944-3481 Pets 



THREE BEOFIOOM HOUS- 
ES, apartments, and duplex- 
es. Several locations Avail- 
able June. July, and August 
Pets allowed in most 
www reni-spm.com. 
(785)539-4357 

THREE BEDROOM. ONE 
bathroom $825 Available 
June 1 . Washer/ dryer Cen 
Iral air. Pats negotiable 
(785)539-9582 

THREE BEDROOM. TWO 
bath home Clean, newly re 
modeled, new appliances 
Off street parking and ga 
rage $900 rent Flexible 
tease starting dale 
(785)341-8515 



FOUR-BEDROOM: CLOSE 
to campus/ City Park Wash- 
er/ dryer and dishwasher 
Large house. June tease 
(785)341 5070 

JUNE, JULV, Auguat Now 
leasing one, two. thro*, four. 



THREE- BEDROOM 

HOUSE on Collage View. 
Ctoa* to west side of cam- 
put. AvaMebte June 1 . 1640/ 
rnonth (766)297.3468 or 

(7fjB)47B-022a 

THREE-BfDROOM, ONE 




NEW FINANCE Plan availa- 
ble on 2002 and newer two 
and three-bedroom homes 
Only $1000- $2000 (town, 
easy credit approval, and K 
costs less than ranting CaH 
Today (785)539-5641 or 
(666)509-5325 (Terms and 
Conditions Apply) 



For flenf- 

Motole Homes 

BRAND NEWI Two and 

three-bedroom manufac- 
tured homes tor rent 
Comae wtlh all appliances 
including washer/ dryei 
Rem prices starting al $550 
s month Call today I 
(785)539-5641 (Terms end 
conditions apply) 



For Sale- 
Mobile Homes 

16"X80' 2001 SchufU Sen- 
sation Three- bedroom two 
balh $29,500 of best offer 
(785)565-0724 

TWOBEDROOM ONE balh 
mobile home Cats and 
small dogs allowed Lot rent 
$145/ month $9000 or best 
otter (785)587-7805 




AVAILABLE FALL Male ot 
female non-smoker No 
piils Three -bedroom 

Washer/ dryer Cable/ Inter 
net $350/ month 2036 Shu 
ley Lane (913)568-6233. 
Apnl 

FEMALE WANTED: Four- 
bedroom, two and one-half 
balh Vanity/ sink in each 
room One-tourth utilities 
One block from campus 
Slan Augusi 1 Jen 
(620)820-3747 Hannah 
(913)6694501 

FEMALE WANTED/ Stiaie 
two- bedroom house Ono 
block to campus Avaasbto 
May 1 $250, all utilities 
paid. Call (785)5374947. 

FEMALE WANTED Share 
two- bedroom apartment 
Ctoaa lo campus $275/ 
month Cheap utilities 
Washer/ dryer and off street 
perking June lease 
(3t6}644-5?)9 

Nice three-bedroom home 
Fully fumtehed Pet friendly 
Jun* 1 was* $225/ month 
ptus one-third utilities Call 
Caml (785)31 7 3494 

RESPONSIBLE FEMALE 
roommates wanted tor luxu 
ry lour bedroom apartment 
across slreet from west 
campus No pats, no smok- 
ing short lease okay 
(765)776-6318 

ROOMMATE NEEDED, 
Jun* or Augusi, $245/ 
month, on*-lhlrd utilities 
about $60. heel paid, across 
from City Park. CaH Adam 
(620)655-1101 

ROOMMATE WANTED as 
soon as possible $250 plus 
one-third utjftt** Ctos* to 
campus Contact Anoxia 
(816)606-6094 

ROOMMATES NEEDED 
pay orta-fourth utilities. Nice 
house, fenced-in backyard, 
qutet nteghborhood CaJf tor 
detail, (316)481-7377 

ROOMMATES WANTED 
Now three- bedroom, two 



mom houses snd duptexes 
ww w , (.ejUJB rfl.*e.ojn. 
(785^38-4357 

NEW UCTWH1: Avsllabl* 
soon. Three-bedroom, two 
balh Larg* living room, 
gam* room, computer room. 
Localsd al 918 Bertrand. 
washer/ dryer, caniral air, 
yard, front porch (785)539- 
3672 

NEXT TO campus. Two 

and tour -bedrooms, houses, 
duplexes Wsahar/ dryer, 
csntral ait No pel* Fall 



Outside p*t* okay Call 
Brian (768)567-6447. 

THREE CHRISTIAN fe- 
matea need roommate 
$300/ month uttUUe* includ- 
ed Washer/ dryer/ cable 
Caj«6ndra(785)632-7t59 

WANTED ROOMMATES to 
■hare three-bedroom apart- 
menl next to campus Lunu- 
las paid Central air Wash- 
er/ dryer $325 each August 
t or before (786)636-6446 
(7851566-3405 (785)562- 
67SS 




FEMALE SUBLEASER 

needed tor June and July 
New thr**-b*droom two 
bath horns. Ctos* to cam- 
pus and AggMvtsa. Rent 
$300 (620)307-3629. 



JUNE/ JULV 



Rang*, i«frtg*ralor. waah*r/ 
dry** inducted Realty do** 
Id campus Must **• 
(706)463-6014 




DeadlineM 

QBaflWadsiTHJstbe • 
placed tjy noon the day 
twtow you wart you atr 
to run. desalted dtspUy 
a* must be plstBd trt 
4p.m, two awkifxjfjays 
prwi lo the dale you a*** 
your ad to run. 
cm 532-6555 



ClassitiedRATES 

1DAY 

20 words oi less 

$8.25 

each wort) ovet 20 

20$ per word 

2 DAYS 

20 words ot less 

$9.65 

each word over 20 

25e per wotd 

3 DAYS 

20 words or leas 
$11.30 

each word over 20 
30e per word 

4 DAYS 

20 words or less 

$12.50 

each word over 20 

35c per word 

5 DAYS 

20 words or less 

$1360 

each word over 20 

40c pet word 

{ consecutve day rale } 



TO PLACE AN AD 

Go to Ked7ie 103 

(across from the 

K-Slale Student Union) 

Office hours are 

Monday trough Friday 

Iron 8 am to 5 pm 

The office is open 

except on holidays. 



HOW TO PAY 

All classifieds must bt- 

paid in advance ut*j<* 

you have an account 

wtthSludent 

Putjlicatjons Inc 

Cash, check, 

MasterCard of Vsa are 

accepted There is a 

$10 service charge on 

all returned dwelt* 

We reserve b^tsghO. 

eoH, reject ot pfop«J|r 

Classify any ad -J 



FREE FOUND ADS 

As a service to yt- 
run lourtd ads tor lhn*e- 
days tree of charga* • 

J: 

CORRECTIONS 

If you and an error * 

your ad, please call us. 

We accepl responsr 

batty only for the first 



CANCELLATIONS 

B you sett your item 

before your ad has 

expired, wa wif refund 

you ror the mma*hjng 

days. You must call us 

Wore noon the day 

batons irn ad «ic be 

p-jokshed 



HEADLINES 

For an extra charge, 

wel put a heovdane 

atxiveyx>urax1tocalch 

the reader's aitentJort. 



/:/;/ 



nuTle tin 

tVcMrsf 





>p#tt 



rrsau-ktnf 




aaaaa) 



tm -^ m 



BBBBBBBBl 



3: 



CLASSIFIEDS 



To place an advertisement call 






Friday, May 6, 2005 




KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



310 



Page 15 





ONE BEDROOM APART- 
MENT available for June 
auttease Close to campus. 
AIM available for August 
Lease price negotiate Call 
1785)341 9536 

ONE-BEDRQOM SUB- 

LEASE pels Allowed, cloee 
to campus May rent paid, 
available May 10 (913)424 
3777 

SUBLEASER NEEDED' 
Walk to school and Aggw- 
vtlle One -bed room apart - 
menl S27bi frtontti June 
Nough July Av.nUhi... u, iv 
?3 Call Floy (785)341-8487 

SUMMEH SUBLEASE rwo- 
riedroom apartment Close 
to campus Call Chns lw de- 
tails (913)488-0118. 

SUMMER SUBLEASE 

Roomy studio apart merit 
One-halt bloc* ffom cam- 
pus, off-streef parking, laun 
dry access. Mater and trash 
paid Call Dakota (785)727- 
MS1 

THREE ROOMS available 
<n five bedroom house 
Juno/ Jury Washer/ dryet. 
cheap urmiies $250 each 
1011 Thurston Call 
1785)582-7323 or (785)587- 
5787 

TWO ROOMS available in 
tour-bedroom newer apart 
monl Washer/ dryer includ 
pd Low ulilrlros Close to 
campus and Agrjievilte 
Rent S287 per month Call 
(620)285-5992 or (620)793 
2200 

TWOBEDROOM APART 
MENT available tor summer 
S520V month Close to Ag- 
gievHle Available June 
100S Blupmonl (7851537- 
MM 

1 WO BEDROOM. ONE 
bath available now ihmugh 
July 28 Pool and laundry la 
cillties One block from cam- 
pus $S35 per monlh 
(785)231-9191 




empioymcn t/ 
opportunities 

310 



Help Wanted 

The Collegian cannot veri- 
fy the financial potential of 
advert Itamentt In the Em- 
ployment/Career classifi- 
cation Readers are ad- 
vised to approach any 
such employment oppor- 
tunity with reasonable 
caution. The Collegian 
urges our readers to con- 
tact the Better Business 
Bureau, 50 1 SE Jefferson, 
Topeka. KS 86807-1190 
r7BS)232-04M 

Manhattan City Ordinance 
4814 assures every per- 
son equal opportunity in 
securing and holding em- 
ployment In any field of 
work or labor for which 
he/ she Is property quali- 
fied regardless of 



national origin or ances- 
try Violations should be 
reported to the Director of 
Human Resources at City 

Hall, (785)587-2441. 

IBARTENIJING' $300 a day 
potential No experience 
necessary Training provid- 
ed Call 1 -800-965-0520 ext 

144 

CAMPUS MINISTRY Build 
iftg Manager nvilh apartmeril 
Ltxrfcmy lor male to share 
Two- bedroom apartment and 
Ml ffUfKQ I campus ministry 
building Paid untitles, tree 
parking directly across from 
campus Begin August 15 
Call David a< (785)539- 

-VM1 



Congratulate Graduates 

Curt.n Piwerty Company 

Curtin Property Company it a longtime 
supporter of Kansas State University 



l,.|. l „l. | ||.|i- ! lil.lMlffl fTffrl 



Cwtfa Ptoperty «»« »«« . 

Comptny alio has propeitSejf include 
wartminl homes in §P°WP ttJim * IX( } 
OwrlandPark, KS 
The Wood* of 
Cherry Creek 



Wettcbestei Paxk 
m Manhattan. E5 



Call 913-266-1187 Today 

and tell them you called from 

Wildcat Connection. 



The WoodsofCherryCreefc.coiii 



ATTN. ARCHITECTURE 
students. Los Angeles- 
beaed design firm In need 
of draftsman. Looking for 
third or fourth-year stu- 
dent tor part-time posi- 
tion Make Los Angeles In- 
come with Kansas living 
cost. Musi be proficient 
with AutoCad 1002 or later 
and be able to produce 
floor plans and detailed 
sections. Call JNH De 
signs (3 1 0)754-»1M. aak 
for Jerod. 

COL DRIVERS FOR SUM- 
MER WORK Cowan World 
Wrde Moving is looking lor 
college students with a 
Class A or B Commercial 
Diver's License for lull time 
summer work Need 10 Stay 
In town (or summer, stay in 
shape, and save some 
cash? Great internship alter- 
native and take advantage 
of your enisling tease/ rental 
agreement Job » to par- 
torm packing, loading, and 
delivery ol household goods 
lo our military and commer- 
cial customers along with 
arivmg CDL vehicle to a lo- 
cal fObarte Apply as soon as 
po*a*ie at 615 S nth St. 
on Fori Riley Blvd. Very 
competitive $9 00 to II t 00 
hourly/ incentive wages Job 
begins immediately follow- 
ing Spring finals week 
through summer and option- 
al part-time work In Fall ol 
2005 Equal Opportunity 
Employer 

FULL AND pad-time posi- 
tions available lor furniture 
delivery and installation 
Heavy lifting required Appli- 
cant must have a clean 
Class C diver's license Ap- 
ply in person al Furniture 
Warehouse, 2326 Sky -vue 
Lane, Manhattan Behind 
Bhggs Auto Lane 

FULL-TIME OR part-time 
help on small call ranch/ 
farm ( ?85|532-894T or 
(785)393-5806 

FULL TIME SUMMER help 
wanted Roof truss manu- 
facturing plant, 5107 Murray 
Rd. (785)776-5081 

GET PAID tor your opin- 
ions' Earn SI 5- S12S and 

mora per survey! 

www.moneyforiurveya.cb 
m 

GRAflUME ASSISTANT 
SHIP m Educational Innova- 
tion and Evaluation, May 
August, must be enroled si 
sii graduate level credit 
hours See 

araneJuu.edu/oele lor de 
n and application m 
•ilruirlions. Email 

cahumanOKau sdu tor more 
information 

NOW HIRING three interns 
lor summer Open to all ma 
jors Gam career skills Ac 
counting, public relations, 
marketing, communication, 
travel, average earns $700/ 
Call (785)317-0455 



GREAT SUMMER income 
Asbestos Abatement Work- 
ers needed 40 hours ol tree 
training Is required Class 
starts May 31 runs through 
June 3. BOO- 4:30pm 
$1160 per hour Contact 
Laborers' Local 1390. 710 
Mom, lor an application Of 
call [785)537-1567 

HARVEST HELP wanted 
We are currently looking for 
temporary wheat harvest 
help in Wichita. KS Job In- 
cludes scale work, and gram 
receiving 19 00/ hour over- 
time la required Contacl 
Debruce Grains Company. 
Wichita, KS (600)733-8752. 
ask for Nell, Kent or Donnle 
Equal Opportunity Employ- 
er 

HELP WANTED for custom 
harvesting, combine opera- 
tors and truck drivers Guar 
anteed pay Good summer 
wages Call (970)483-7490 
evening* 

KITCHEN HELP wanted 
Full Or part -time Apply In 
person 1130 Mora 

LOVE 2 party? Lava 2 
dance? Love attention? 
Send Me An Angel is |ust for 
you! Minimum $70/ hour 
Contact (573)200-0474 
www sendmeanangelnow c 
om Hiring Manhattan males 
and females 

LUBE TECH/ Automotive 
Maintenance Specialist 
Part-time positions available 
immediately. Catl (785)565- 
5880 with personal informa- 
tion 

MOVIE EXTRAS/ MODELS 
Needed! Young laces need- 
ed to tin a variety of lobs 1 
Candidates needed tor 
crowd and background 
scenes tor local productions 
No experience required 1 All 
looks needodl Up lo $22 
hourly' Call (800)260-0177 
now lor more information 

NOW ACCEPTING applica 
bona for part-time and week 
end furniture sales Sue 
cesslul applicant will be 
inendty and neat m appear- 
ance. Possets good cus- 
tomer service and sales 
skills Competitive wages 
Apply in person at furniture 
warehouse 2326 Sky-Vue 
Lane. Manhattan Behind 
Biggs Auto Lane 

NOW HIRING Vista Drive 
In. a locally owned and op- 
erated quick service restau- 
rant >s adding lo our team 
Individuals must have a pos- 
itive attitude and be able to 



Others in a fast paced envi- 
ronment We have multiple 
part-time and a lew lus-time 
positions available, musl be 
able lo work during the day 
K5U students encouraged 
We offer meal discounts, 
flexible hours and promote 
tram within Apply In person 
at 191 1 Turtle Creek Blvd. 



APARTMENT V- RESIDENCES 

Candlewood Or. 77(vl 18 Modeb Open Daily 



Now Leasing! 

Sp acious 1 & 2 Bedroom A pts. 

A few homes remain for 
Graduate Students and Upper Class Serious Students 



PART-TIME NANNY Mon- 
day. Tuesday 8- 4.30 Two 
c hidr en ages 3 years and 7 
months Topeka area. Ref- 
erence* needed (785)478- 
0768 



PERMANENT PART-TIME 
secretary Excellent skills in 
typing and computer Vari- 
ous duties (785)539-2358 



REFLECTION PHOTOGRA 
PHY is looking lor a self mo 
dueled outgoing individual 
for a full lime sales person/ 
office assistant Must be 
available Tuesday Satur- 
day Call (785)539-1550. 



RILEY ELEVATOR hiring 
lor immediate lull time store 
clerk, part-time negotiable- 
Cash handling preferred 
Customer service and ability 
10 HI 50 lit a must Contact 
Debate at (785)485-2216 



SCHOLARSHIP OPPOR- 
TUNITIES and Internship 
Ministry Experience Here I 
f ust ! J resbytenan Chutch 
1. Youth Group*: Youth 
Group Advisors- Soaking 
young adults at 18- 25 who 
would be interested in work- 
ing with our Junior and Se 
ntor High Fellowships We 
are looking for Chnst cen- 
tered young adults who 
have a heart tor youth and 
spreading the Gospel Mes 
sage Not to mention having 
a good sense of humor and 
an ability to relate to teen- 
agers 

2 Music: Contemporary 
Worship Service 5 00 on 
Sundays We are looking tor 
young adults who would like 
to be a part of a worship/' 
praise band (team) Instru- 
mentalists needed piano 
(keyboard), guitar, bass, 
and percussion. 
3. Drama: Do you have 
knack tor drama and a heart 
for the Lord? Drama learn 
members wanted tor Con- 
temporary service Help us 
communicate the gospel 
message m new ways to 
reach everyone! 
If you would like to learn 
more pfeeae contact us at 
First Presbyterian (7851537- 
051 B or email staff ft tir si- 
pre emanrutitAii mm in the 
Faith. Pastor Anne Schoiber 



1 Pipe Supply Com- 
pany has an opening tor a 
Systems Anatysl Position is 
responsible tor business 
process design, testing, 
(raining, and support Quali 
teattons include B.S degree 
in business, computer sci- 
ence, or related field Must 
have general knowledge of 
business processes Candt 
dates Should submit resume 
to Personnel Department. 
Systems Analyst. P.O. Box 
1668. Manhattan, KS 
66505 Equal Opportunity 
Employer 



SUMMER KITCHEN help 
needed Please apply at 
Kile's Bar and Grill, 615 N 
12th Street >r Aooievafe 



H/)lp Wanted 



STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 

Inc. has a part-lime position 
for a Macintosh technician 
available Immediately. The 
tech support team maintains 
about 50 Macintosh work- 
stations, providing software 



_ 



ing 



should 

have some experience wrth 
Mac OSX server and be fa- 
miliar with design software 
such as Adobe Photoshop. 
Adobe InOesign and Quark 
Express. Any experience 
with networking program- 
ming or with UNIX/Linux is 
also helpful Pay starts at 
$7 50 per hour with the op- 
portunity to advance Only 
students currently enrolled 
in spring 2005 for at tout 
six hours at Kansas Stale 
University can be consid 
ered You are strongly en- 
couraged to contact Michael 
Yopa al (78515320733 or 
stop by Ked/ie 1 1 5 lor more 
information about the poai- 
uon Applications may be 
picked up in KedZte 11 J or 
115 Or online al 
hilpJ/sBub.ksu edu'tegh'ap- 
plicalion.hlml Please in 
elude your current class 
schedule 



SUMMER CAMP FARM IN- 
STRUCTOR needed for 
Girts Seoul overnight camp 
in Colorado southwest of 
Denver Manage small (arm 
(horses, burros, chickens, 
ducks, goats, llamas, pig. 
etc ) and instruct campers m 
animal care and behavior 
Lale May- early August 
Competitive salary, housing, 
meals, health insurance, 
travel and end -ol- season 
bonuses Apply online al 
www . girtscou ismi leh i . q rg/co 
mejobs or (303)838-5111 



SUMMER CAMP JOBS IN 
COLORADO Tomahawk 8 
Flying C Ranch Live and 
work in the mountains 5W 
of Denver General Counse- 
lors. Program Specialists 
(Western horseback rtdng. 
backpacking crafts, nature, 
sports, challenge course, 
lam pioneer, dance and 
drama). Health Supervisors 
(RN LPN EMT. WFR| and 
Administrative Positions. 
Late May- early August 
Competitive salary, housing 
meats, health insurance, 
travel and end -Of -season 
bonuses To apply, visit 
www.girlscoutsmilehi org/ca 
mptobs or cat (303)607 
4819 



BUMMER HAY help Long 
hours Good US (785)587 
5852 



SUMMER INTERNSHIP 
ALTERNATIVE-MOVER 

Covan World-Wide Moving 
is looking lor college slu 
dents lor summer work Ex- 
cellent opportunity to slay in 
town for summer, slay in 
shape, and save some cash 
or K you need an internship 
alternative or summer em- 
ployment Helpers and 
packers to perform packing 
and loading of household 
good to our military and 
commercial customers No 
CDL required Apply as 
soon as possible al 515 S 
11th Street on Fort Hi ley 
Brvd Very competitive $7 50 
10 $9 00 hourly/ incentive 
wages Job begins immedi- 
ately following spring finals 
week through summer 
Equal Opportunity Employ - 



SUMMER POSITION Look- 
ing for a responsible 
uei lo walch our three chil- 
dren at our home beginning 
June 1 Monday- Friday 
830- 5 30 Ages ate 4, 8. 
to Heletences n 
Please call Kevin al (785) 
584-1607 



YOUTH MINISTER. Pari 

time position, perfect lm in 
dividual or couple to work 
with teen youth aa Christian 
mentor and congregation's 
Youth Minister We Seek 
someone committed, organ- 
ized, and faithful Contact 
Kathleen Jones. (785)776- 
1745 or Peace Lutheran 
Church. (785)539-7371 



LOOKING FOR small used 
dorm refrigerator Call Melo- 
dy at (308)340-1847 




A Saturday Haiku 

[ >!,.[., .11 Mote game, 

t'.iiii|>iitcr repaired in clmc 

I v* ri'h'hralkun. 

I all Cavchein Wc\ilt>"p 
Mitihutl.ui. 7B5-776-3.W 



$10! POLICE SEIZED prop- 
erty TVs, PCs, DVD Play- 
ers, and more from $101 For 
mare information (600)386- 
0307 art M670 

COVEHNMENT SURPLUS 
field gear, boots, camou- 
flage clothing, much more' 
Also Carhartt Workwear 
Open Monday Friday 
9am- 5 30pm. Saturday 
9a.m - 4pm SI Mary's Sur 
plus Sates, St Mary's. KS 
(785(437-2734 




5!0 



KEOORATOR FOR sale 
$150, or best otter Call 
Jeff (785)271-1641 



Automobiles 

$5001 POI ICC IMPOUNDS' 
Hondas/ 1 Che vies/ Jeeps 
etc Cars/ Trucks/ SUV's 
trom $5011' For lislmge and 
informal inn call (800(366 
0124 ext 7538 



Furniture lo 
Buy/Sell 

THREE PERSON SOFA 
Good condition $50 or best 
offer Call (785 1 241-5676 

TWIN MAT I HESS tor sale 
wilh matching bed Irame 
and dresser Call (785)317- 



1997 DODGE Ham 1500 
1 1 1 .000 miles, tow package 
quad cab $6000 (316)644- 
5040 



Motorcycles 




Business 
Opportunities 



SATURDAY MAY 14. 
6am- 3pm 719 Ridge 
wood Dr Used lumiture. in- 
eluding desk, wardrobe clos- 
et couch, dryer and krtchen 
stuff 

435) 



The Collegian cannot verl- CotTipulOfS 
fy the financial potential of 
advertisements in the Em- 
ployment/Career classifi- 
cation Readers are ad- 
vised lo approach any 
such business opportuni- 
ty with reasonable cau- 
tion. The Collegian urges 
our readers to contacl the 
Better Business Bureau. 
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KS 66607-1190 (765)232- 
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^w^^^^^m 



Page 16 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Friday, May 6, 2005 



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LCOLLEGIAN 



www.ktfalccollcgiiin com 



Sub Exp DaU 
Kansas State Htstonc.il Societv 
Newspaper Section 
PO Box 3585 
TopekaKS 66601 

damage in region 

Story Page ft 




Supreme Court 

agrees to hear 

Kansas case 



By J«sm Manning 

KANSAS SUIE COLIEGIAN 

A December ruling by Ihe Kansas 
Supreme Court thai found the state's 
death penally law unconstitutional may 
be overturned when the US Supreme 
Court takes up the case later this year. 

The high court's decision to hear 
arguments on the case puts the sen- 
tences of seven convicted murderers 
in limbo. 

The court announced its decision 
lo hear the case last Tuesday If ruled 
constitutional, death row inmates like 
|<ihn Robinson, convicted of murder- 
ing eight women and girls in Kansas 
and Missouri, could have the death 
penalty reinstated 

The Kansas Supreme Court decided 
last year that the state's death penalty 
was flawed due lo the precedence given 
to execution. The law states that if a 
jury weighs arguments for and against 
the death penally equally, their decision 
should support capital punishment 

The Kansas court's decision was a 
reversal from an earlier stance. 

|i>hn Fitter, associate professor of 
political science al K-State, said the 
Kansas Supreme Court had altered 
their position on Ihe death penalty. 
surprising some legislators 

"The flau In the 1994 law thai re- 
instated I hi- Kansas death penalty 

teemed to utggesi thai there was a tie 
be t w ee n mitigating and aggravating 
circumstances," Filler said 

\ few years ago, (the cuurl) decid- 
ed that a judge can instruct the jury. 
In December they decided that wasn't 
good enough Now the legislature has 
to fix the law, and the decision can't be 
left to a ptd 

See WW Paget 



Fort Riley readies 

for returning men, 

additional units 



«AWA5SUll«HHGIAN 

More soldiers are coining to Fort 
Riley, which will have a large impact 
on surrounding communities. 

About 8,000 soldiers will come lo 
Fori Riley by 201 1 

|eff Covcrdale, community relations 
officer, said 1,400 soldiers will arrive 
later this year and early next year for a 
Unit of Action The soldiers will form a 
new brigade from the ground up called 
Ihe 6th Brigade 25th Infantry. 

In addition lo the soldiers, about 
4,700 family members are expected to 
come as well, and they will be settling 
in surrounding communities 

"There is no on post housing fur 
those family members,'' Covcrdale said 
■ 1 Imse family members must rent, buy 
or lease in the surrounding area " 

Then, the Base Realignment and 
Closure Committee recommended ex- 
panding Fort Riley on May 13 This 
would bring another 4,385 soldiers 
and about 6,000 more family members 
lo the area This is not official but will 
he hv the end of this year, he said. 

Coverdalc* said Fort Riley has been 
working with local communities to ac- 
commodatc the soldiers and families 

To begin with, Fort Riley was work- 
ing with communities within a 20-mile 
radius, but thai radius was increased 
to 50 to 60 miles due to the amount of 
need, he said 

C overdalc said housing, traffic and 
schools are being adjusted to accom 
modale the soldiers and their families 

City Commissioner Bruce Snead 
said Manhattan has been preparing for 
the influx of soldiers, since it was an- 
nounced 3,400 would be coming 

See FORT RUEV Page 6 



Wednesday. June 8, 2005 



Vol 109 No 1 59 



Legislature asked to review K-12 funding 



By Za chary T. Eckels 

KANSAS STAHCOUEulAN 

The Kansas Supreme Court or- 
dered the legislature to double the 
amount of money being added to 
public school aid in time for the 
next school year 

The decision to increase Ihe 
amount being added from $142 mil- 
lion to $285 million was based on 
evidence given by a consulting firm, 
Ron Keefovcr, education-intorma 
lion officer said The legislature had 
previously hired the consulting firm 
to determine how much money was 
necessary to provide an adequate 
education. 

The $853 million that the firm 



reported was the only evidence that 
the supreme court had, he said 

"The court determined that at least 
a third of this was needed," Kecfover 
said. 

The court's order could be consid- 
ered a victory for Governor Sebelius, 
who had previously argued for $300 
million to be added to (he slate aid for 
public schools, said press secretary for 
the governor's office Nicole Corcoran. 

"That number is obviously closer lo 
the number that the Supreme Court 
said was needed." she said 

With so much uncertainty about the 
amount of money that will be available, 
USD 383 has been only able to work in 
tentative numbers said David Colhurn 
Vice President of the school board 



The unanimous decision by the 
court reinforces what the district court 
has said and it is a victory for the school 
districts, he said. 

"1 don't thinM any of the legislators 
should be surprised by this When 1 
looked up this bill it didn't measure up 
to what the supreme court told them 
to do," Colburn said "It went the op- 
posite direction, in my opinion." 

The ruling lo add this money before 
the next school year caused Sebelius to 
call the legislature into its first special 
session since 1989. 

This leaves them with a 27-day 
deadline to change the entire budget, 
said Rachel le Colombo, Communica- 
tions Director lor Doug Mays 

"The court ruling doesn't seem 



to appreciate the legislative process. 
There is quite a bit of time and special 
consideration when looking at a plan 
that affects the entire state." she said. 
"This was very unexpected " 

Sen Roger KeiU, l\ Manhattan. 
said that he wasn't surprised at all by 
this decision the court made 

"These judges are not going out of 
their way to be obnoxious, they are do- 
ing their job This case was forced upon 
them by the appeal process," he said 

Reitz said that he fell the court did 
what they should have when deciding 
the lawsuit against the state that begun 
with the Sail na and Dodge City school 
districts. 

SeeLEGTSlATURtPageo 



Manhattan celebrates Groups draw 

inspiration 
from lineage 




Catrlna Rawion | foil f&iAN 
Yvonne Larson of Watervtlle, Km., looks through a box ot supplies Saturday at City Pari Larson spent the afternoon cooking and < ilking to festival attendees it the 

Manhattan, Riley County festivities draw thousands 



By J, Scott Bowman 
KANSAS STATE (QtlEGIAN 

In spite of the storms that drenched 
City Park, the spirits of people cel- 
ebrating the 150th birthday of Riley 
County weren't dampened 

An estimated 12,000 people en- 
joyed a number of vendors, recre- 
ations, entertainment and a parade 
for the Celebrate 150! Festival 

There were a number of things thai 
the Celebrate 150! committee could 
control and a number, including the 
weather, they couldn't, Dave Lewis, 



chairman of the Celebrate 1501 com- 
mittee said 

"I think some people were disap- 
pointed that they couldn't see (mu- 
sical group) Sha Na Na perform or 
see the fireworks," Lewis said "But 
sometimes things are out of your con- 
trol. But I think the things that were 
in our control went very well." 

The fireworks have been post 
poned until Aug 13, which is the last 
Arts in the Park performance. Lewis 
said 

See ISO VIMS Page 7 



If you go: 
Celebrate ISO! 

June 11: taster Gardeners Historic Garden lout 
tune 17 and 11: Juneteenih celebrations 
June II 21 : Groat Plans Chautauqua 
June 23-26: touniry Stampede 
July 2 J: little Apple Jan Festival 
JvJjr 21 Aug. 1: Alley County Fair 

For more information on these ot other events, 
visit the Celebrate ISO 1 Web site at 
www.eelebratt 750. org. 



By Sarah Rice 

KANSAS StUTE COiltGWH 

Twelve-year-old Gunnar Naughton 
doesn't learn history from the text- 
books, he lives it. 

Naughton, who is homeschooled, 
reenacts battle scenes and marches 
in parades, including the Celebrate 
150' parade Saturday, as part of his 
education He ha* learned to carry a 
musket and use black powder as well 
as answer questions from curious 
onlookers. 

Naughton and his father, Mark, 
are members o( the Sons of the 
American Revolution organization. 
Members have to prove they arc a 
descendent of a participant in the 
Revolutionary War to join the group 

"1 know a little more about my 
heritage and about the kinds of 
things people did and wore," said 
Gunnar Naughton, a lOth-generation 
descendent 

Not only did the Naughtons 
march in the parade, but they walked 
around City Park where festivities 
were taking place, teaching people 
about America's past 

Remembering that history wheth- 
er it's Manhattan's 150 years or the 
founding of our country is essential 
to appreciating our ancestors, Mark 
Naughton said 

"It puts people in link with the 
past," he said 

Also a part of the parade was the 
partner organization Daughters of 
the American Revolution. 

"We have alt the Revolutionary 
folks in the Jeep Wranglers," Mary 
Lindquist, member, said 

Linda Weis, acting regent of the 
lni.il chapter, said the group was 
started in 1910 in Manhattan, and 
its membership grows by 10 percent 
each year The organization currently 
has 50 members, 

In addition to parades, the or- 
ganization participates in support 
activities for local veterans and visits 
veterans in nursing homes 

New Manhattan resident Su- 
san Lee is a junior member of the 
organization and just completed her 
paperwork proving her ancestry, 
which took her one and a half years 
of research 

Her relative, Noah Lee, was 
stationed in Pennsylvania as part of 
a unit that provided protection from 
Native Americans She also dressed 
in costume - dresses borrowed from 
the Riley County Historical Society 
- and walked in the parade to eel 
eh rate both her own history and the 
anniversary of Manhattan and Riley 
County. 

"It's a nice way to recognize 
Manhattan's 150th," she said "It's 
exciting to have the paperwork of 
your lineage to celebrate who your 
family was." 



Today 




High 91 
Low 68 



Thursday 



• 



High 88 
Low 67 



NEWS HIGHLIGHTS 



Men not linked to jihad 

Attorneys fct three icnortsnt defendants 
toMjunvs Tuesday that the men were 
ww associated wtth the Palestinian 
ktamk Mhad and bad innocent t iplana- 
BQfts lot comments that were wiretapped 
by MwestJoaforY 



Clash in Bolivia 

Riot poke find tear gas and clashed 
wtth protesters Tuesday demanding mot* 
power (« Bottvu's Irnpovembed Indian 
mijonry as an offer by the president to 
resign failed to halt t crippling blockade ui 
the Bolivian capital 



fort Riley court-martial 

Military prosecutors argued that a ft 
Riley Army sergeant shut two of his Mlow 
soldiers because he had grown par anwd 
and angry am me possibility they might 
reveal his drug trafficking 



DON'T FORGET 



Undergraduate student 
application for August 
graduation due in dean's 
office by Jww 10. 



SuftVMf intramural 
•ante are accepted at 
the CtMittf E. Pttffi 

HMO IW* 



BuiMIng hours at Hak 
Library an: 

nftim to4 )0prn Won 
day through Thursday 
nlamioSpnv Friday 
n noon to 4pm Saturday 
nlpm lomdrnght Sunday 
andnd*Mdo*iyM 
My 4. 




■MM 



■»■* 



^4ta 



- 



I. H««I4.«P^^^^H 



e«W 



^^^"^^^^^BP'^WW 



Page 2 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Wednesday, June 8, 2005 



^laflin Rook* and £opt*i 



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www ctadinbooks. com 



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(785) 776-377* 
'Fax: (785)776-1009 



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BDR I II r I N J M P W 

Saturday's Ovpioquip: OUR KiTTkN KNOWS 
HOW TO KUN THE XEROX MACMINH, SO Wl 
snot i|. D PROBABLY NAME HER COPYCAT, 
Ibday'l Cryptoquip Clue; T equals D 



NEW CRYPrOQUiP BOOKS 3 * 41 S&* W M loi on* book a » 



lor bolt* (er-flcVm o ) to Gryptoquf) 
53M7S, Orl»ro». H. 32863-647S 



Classics Bookt 3 and 4. PQ Son 



The Cryptoqu.p is ■ *ut»ttlut>o<i cipher in which one latter stand* tor 
another II you thmlt that X equals O. I »* equal O throughout the 
ouule S*ngto letter*, short words and wonts usatg an apostrophe 
give you dues ID locating vowels. SoKrton is by tnai and error 
O 2005 by King Features Syndicate, inc. 



Crazy captions 




At the (olltgim we strive to ronned our readers with their newspaper in fun and innovative ways. Each 
week this summer, there will be a photograph here. We encourage readers to e-maii tun captions lor that pho 
to. The captions will be run the following week, along with a new photo. As many captions as space permits 
wil I be printed on a first c ome, first serve basis. We reserve the right to eicludt obscene or libelous ent n e s 



STREET TALK 

What's the most exciting thing you're doing this summer? 




"Planning my wedding, 
which is next May" 

J*«ic» Settle 

r s5NI0fi IN HUMAN 
KOlOa AND MAV> 
COMMUNICATIONS 



SETTLE 



(J3Vj 



Tm not really doing 
anything editing, 
Stampede and gomg In 
Florida" 

Kim Peterson 

SENIOR IN DIETETICS 

wljmmONANO 

KINESIOlOd* 



PETERSON 




"Moving to LA , my wile 
and I, at ihe end of July, 
beginning of August" 

Kevin Knox 
CHRISTIAN CHAUFNM 
EMPLOYEE 




"I'm going to Indi.i tor a 
week and a halt" 

Robbie Nutter 

CHRISTIAN CHAttENGf. 
EMPLOYEE 



KNOX 



NUTTER 




"Stampede — Its not a 
very earning summer' 

Ted Beauchamp 

SENIOR IN MWH 



BEAUCHAMP 




'traveling I've been to DC 
a few times and am going 
to New Memo " 

Dominique Palien 

SENIOR IN BKHOtr 



PALSEN 





1am going to Europe for 
two weeks di the end ol 
the summer* 

Danee Ooubek 

SENIOR IN BIOLOGY 




Writing a book about 
how violent television 
afrerts people with 
mental dfsorders 

Tom Grimes 

PKOFESSOROI 
lOURNAl SIM/MASS 
C0MMUNIC4IIONS 



OOUBEK 



GRIMES 



The blotter 

■ 

Arrests in Riley County is 

Reports are taken directly from Riley County Police 
Department's daily logs. The Collegian does not list 
wheel lochs or minor traffic violations because of space 
constraints. 

Sunday, June 5 

■ At 12 OS a m , Leronka digger. HOC Marian Ave , Apt 601, was ar- 
rested lor criminal trespassing Bond was set at $500 

■ At MM a.m., (hartes Parsons, Junction City, was arrested for disorderly 
conduct Bond was set at S7S0 

■ At 1 -40 a.m., Crystal Mcfheron, ?H Mora St., was arrested (or Dill 
Bond was set at S7S0 

■ At J: W a m , Clifton Davis, 1 Ut> Yuma St , was arrested lor possession 
ol opiates Bond was set at $5,000 

■ At 1 a.m., Seio Kisangani, 1 1 W Claflin Road, was arrested for disorder)) 
(onduct. Bondwassetat$7S0 

■ At 8 a m , Angil Y«pd|uo, 1 740 Vaughn Drive, was arrested for disorderly 
conduct Bond was set at 5 750 

■ At <) 20 am , dary Manges, Junction City, was arrested for probation ... 
violation Bond was set at $750. 

• At 12pm, Noel Cava/os. Fort Riley, was arrested for faMy reporting t 
crime Bond was set at $750 

■ Alt 10 p m , Louise Ashworth, 1 2 to Marian Ave , was arrested f a 
hatter* BondwassetalSSOO 

■ At 4 20 p m Stephen Amtfuuer, homeless, was arrested for probation 
violation Bom) was set at $5,000 

■ At 4S4 pm Rayon* Pryor, 2046 College View Road, was arrested for " 
dmnng on a suspended license Bond was set at $750 

■ At 5:45 pm , Johnny Cossey, Ogden, was arrested tor criminal use 
al a weapon, possession ol a simulated con trailed substance, unlawful 
possession of depressants and driving on a suspended license Bond wts 
set at $2,000 

■ At 9:20 p m Michael Oakley, 1622 W. Osage St, was arrested lor driving, 
on a suspended license Bond was set at S50O 



Monday, June 6 



-* ■ 



■ At 1 22 a m . Colby Btown, 82 1 Yuma St., Apt I was arrested lor 
obstruc i ion of t he legal process and failure to appear Bond was set at , , 
$1,020 

■ At 17 H p m , Lee Hill, Junction City, was attested (or driving on a 
suspended license. Bond was sel al 5500 

■ At 2 JCi p m , Peqgy Wilson, Ogden, was arrested (or failure in appear, ' ' 
probation violation, possession of a simulated controlled substance and- •• 
possession ol opiates Bond was sel at $o,$00 

■ At Idi pm , Sarah Southard, 3000 turtle Creek Btvd , was arrested for ' 
ex tradition ol imprisoned person No bond was set 

■ At 3 )0 p m , Valane Wooten, 1 314 Flint Hills Place, was arrested for " '. ' 
aggravated battery Bond was set at $ 1 , 500 

■ Al 10 15 p m , James Harrison, homeless, was arrested tor failure Id 
appear Bond was set at $ 1 ,000 



Tuesday, June 7 



•j 



■ At 2 4S a m , iason Hardevty, 1H3S Manhattan Ave , was arrested ■ 
lor cnmmal damage to property and unlawful possession ol depressant!. 
Bond was set at $1,500 

■ Ar 4 c i?ani. Tommy Fnson, 1704(arrLane, no 25, was arrested for'*' 
obstruction of the legal process Bond was set at $500 



Corrections and 
clarifications 

Corrections and c Id riftcations appear in this space If you see 
something that should be corrected, call managing editor ). Scott 
Bowman at $32-6556 ore-mail wttegwminpubkiu.titu. 



Kansas State Collegian 

(USPS 291 020) The Kansas State Collegian, a student newspaper 
at Kansas State University, is published by Sludent Publications ~ 
Inc.. Kedw 103. Manhattan. KS 66506 The Collegian is published 
weekdays during the school year and on Wednesdays during " ' 
the summer Periodical postage is paid at Manhattan, KS 6&S02. ' 
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Kansas State Collegian, . 
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'O Kansas State Collegian, 2005 



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Wednesday, June 8, 2005 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 1 



Student services limit operations, 
not availability for summertime 



By Lindsay Porter 

KANSAS SlMt GAUGUIN 

...For two months, 3,000 stu- 
dents and 800 faculty comprise 
the campus population 

Since many student services 
are funded through student 
privilege fees, some offices will 
operate on reduced hours or 
only be available to students en- 
rolled in summer courses. 

Students enrolled in summer 
courses pay a privilege fee half 
the amount of fall and spring 
semesters 

"There is a reduced time 
frame services are available, 
there are not reduced services," 
said Keith Ratzloff, assistant 
vice president and controller 
"The amount of distribution 
changes, but the percentage ap- 
plied does not change. There is 
just a lower volume of funding 
coming in." 

Of the offices that receive 
a percentage of the student 
privilege fee, all remain open 
to students enrolled in summer 
courses. 

ACADEMIC ASSISTANCE 
CENTER 

Students enrolled in summer 
courses can benefit from the 
Academic Assistance Center 
services Students requesting 
individual tutoring or academic 
counseling can visit Holton 101 
during business hours 

"Because of fewer classes of- 
fered in the summer, there are 
also fewer subjects available for 
tutoring,' said |udith Lynch, 
Academic Assistance Center di- 
rector, said. "Tutoring is a little 
bit scaled down, but if students 
need a tutor, we'll do our best to 
get one " 

Walk-in tutoring sessions are 
reduced from four subjects to 
math courses. Students needing 
mathematical assistance can at- 
tend help sessions in Leasure 
201 

HALE LIBRARY 

Students enrolled in summer 
or fall classes can use the library 
services and reserve materials. 
Ait hough (he library operates 
on reduced hours, the 24-hour 



study area remains active. 

"We are increasing our li- 
brary instruction classes to help 
students become aware of li- 
brary resources and teach them 
how to do research better," Lau- 
rel Littrell, Hale administration 
officer, said. "We are trying to 
be responsive to students' com- 
ments and requests." 

LAFENE HEALTH CENTER 

Lafene services are available 
for students enrolled in summer 
classes. Students who were en 
rolled in spring courses, but not 
attending in the summer, can 
pay a health privilege fee of $45 
for Lafene services. 

K-STATE STUDENT UNION 

In the Union, the recreation 
center remains available for the 
public, and students who pres- 
ent a student ID receive dis- 
counted services. 

The food court operates with 
four counters - Chick-Fil-A, 
Market Carvery, Taco Bel) and 
the salad bar - except during 
new student orientation. The 
Origins counter will remain 
closed during the transition for 
a Panda Express for the fall. 
Chi I lie Willie's Ice Cream Par- 
lor also stays open for summer 
service. 

"Everything closes at 2 p.m.." 
Felicia Grafals, catering super- 
visor and senior in secondary 
education, said. "There arc few- 
er students so the summer is not 
as busy and students who are 
around are normally done with 
class by lunch time " 

Grafals said food services 
dedicates the slower summer 
session to work on projects or 
make changes to make the din- 
ing in the Union better for the 
school year 

Union Programming Council 
also changes its focus to plan- 
ning fall events UPC partners 
with Manhattan Parks and Rec- 
reation to sponsor a jazz festival 
at City Park June 24 The event 
is free to the public. 

"We're funnel ing a lot of our 
energy for this," Beth Bailey, 
assistant director of the Union, 
said "There are many co -spon- 
sors and we'll have some big 



jazz names " 

Coinciding with the jazz fes 
tival is an exhibit in the William 
T Kemper Art Gallery on the 
Union first floor. 

UPC also sells discounted 
Seth Childs Cinema tickets for 
$5.50 

OFFICE OF STUDENT AC- 
TIVITIES AND SERVICES 

Part of the OSAS budget 
funds the SafeRide program 
during the fall and spring se- 
mesters The office is unable to 
fund SafeRide during the sum- 
mer months because there is no 
reserve funding available for 
the program, said Gayle Spen- 
cer, assistant dean of student 
life and coordinator of student 
activities. 

"There is no money to fund 

it in the summer," Spencer said 

There's not enough money to 

fully fund it during the year, and 

no money for summer." 

RECREATIONAL SERVICES 

The Peters Recreation Com- 
plex and Natatorium will op- 
erate with reduced hours for 
students enrolled in summer 
courses Students not enrolled 
in summer courses can pur- 
chase a summer pass in the Rec 
Services office during business 
hours The pool package is $15, 
the Rec Center package is $25 
and a combination package is 
$35 The summer passes are ef- 
fective until Aug 21. 

"Everything normally offered 
is still available, it's just more 
condensed," Kylie Stoecklein, 
Rec Services senior administra- 
tive assistant, said "It's a little 
slower here and not as crowd- 
ed " 

The Rec Center services like 
the Wellness Center, Wildcat 
Workouts and intramurals are 
available during the summer 
operation hours. 

UNIVERSITY COUNSELING 
SERIVCES 

Students enrolled in summer 
courses may continue to visit 
Counseling Services. Enrolled 
students are allocated four com- 
plimentary sessions each fiscal 
year - )uly 1 to June 30 After 



Did you know? 

Summer operation hours 

R« Center 

Monday f fiddy 6 a m - 10 p m 

Saturday 11 j.m.-ipjn. 
Sunday | 10 pm 

Natatorium 

Monday, Wednesday, Friday 6 -7 JO a m , 11:30 

i.m-2.J0pm,7-9p,m 

tiKKtoy, Tbunday 1 1 : 10 1 m - 1 : 30 p m , 7 1 

pm 

Saturday closed 

SundiyMp.in.7-9p.ffl. 

Hate library building hours 
Monday-lhuralay 8 am -12 a.m. 
fiiday8am-5pm 
Saturday M 4pm 
Sunday 1pm -12 am 

Halt library checkout and help desk 

Monday Thursday 8 a m -8 p.ra 
Fridays a m 5pm 
Saturday noon 4pm 
Sunday 1-8 pm 

N-Statt Student Union building hours 
Monday- Saturday 7 am -10pm 
Sunday dosed 

Union Recreation tenter 
Monday -Thursday 11 am -10 p.m. 
Friday 11 am midnight 
Saturday 1 p.m.- midnight 
5unday2-10p.m. 

UftM Health Center 

Monday-Friday 8 10 a m -5 pm 

Saturday 10- 130pm 

Sunday closed 

Some services may be dosed 1 1:)0 im-1 pm 

University Counseling Services 
Monday fnday 8 a m S p m 
Closed noon- 1 p m and weekends 

Academic Assist ante (enter 
Motion 101 

Monday -Friday 8 am -S pm 
walk in math tutoring 
Leasure 201 
Monday-JhursdayU: 10-4:20 pm 

the fourth session, a $12 hourly 
charge is issued After the tenth 
session, the hourly charge in- 
creases to $20. 

Students not enrolled in 
summer courses pay the non- 
student rate of $50 hourly for 
Counseling Services sessions 



Flexible parking 




Phol o i II us 1 rn i o n b y D r * * Ro s e i ' H 1 1 1 , ' * H 



Summer parking creates less 
hassle for faculty, students 



By J. Scott Bowman 

KANSASS1AIEC01UGIAN 

Parking is sometimes a 
problem at K- Si ate, but in the 
summer, it is a little different 

Illegal parking will still be 
ticketed, but specific lot park 
ing permits will not be en- 
forced, Darwin Abbott, direc- 
tor of K State parking, said 

He said during the regular 
school year faculty, slaff, off- 
campus. student and residen- 
tial halls all have their own 
parking lots But due to the 
lack of volume of parking, 
having a K-State campus per- 
mit is enough to park in any 
lot, Abbott said 

"Since we don't have the 
volume and we have a lot of 
work going on. we want to 
make it convenient for people 
to park," he said "You tan 
park in the off-campus park 
ing lot if you have a faculty 
permit, ft jusl makes it easier 
for people to park. 

"But people still can't park 
illegally, say in the handi- 
capped or reserved spots " 

He said another place 
where people park that is still 
en forced i^ the metered park- 
ing, which is in effect from 7 
am to 5 pin on weekdays 

Parking in the summer is 
less uf a hassle than the rest 
nl the year, said Terri Eddy, 
recreation manager for the K 



Slate Student Uiurm Sh. 
it's easier t<i pail, in the Id 
south of the Union than ilu- 
normal school ye*i 

'Generally I halve to gel 

here al ) 15 (a in > 

That's (he Lit est I can gel here 
though Now its open until 8 
O'clock, but after lhai it'j pre! 

h much full for the rest of the 

day" 

Abbot I said even though 
ii I easier to park in the sum 
mer, people still park illegally 
to try arid gel closet to campus 
and specific buildings 

"When I weni oul to lunch 
earlier there were only a COO- 
pie hundred stalls out of i (MM 
in the Wesl Stadium parking 
lot," he said 

He said obtaining a sum 
met parking permit isn't that 
hard, and can he pun based in 
different increments n 
a permit for the entire sum 
mer is prorated and starts oil 
at $16 and can be purchased 
at Edwards Hall. 

He said shttrt icrm park 

Ing permit* can be pure 1, 

at the visitor s booth on 17th 
Street and are good to: 
where from days lo weeks 

Abbott said the onh time 
thai parking services docsfl I 
patrol parking lots is when 
the university is closed, but 
KSU Police still ticket illegal 
parking, such as Mega] hand! 
capped parking 



Targeted Excellence program ends second year funding six projects 



By Lindsay Porter 

KANSAS MAtKOUtOIAN 

Six projects were awarded 
funding over a five-year period 
through the Targeted Excellence 
program 

The program was initiated 
in 2003 to elevate the standing 
and reputation of K- St ate and to 
help the university achieve the 
goal of becoming a top- to land- 
grant university, said Provost 
Duane Nell is 

"The key is to take programs 
that already have some visibility 
and take them lo a new level of 
visibility and success" he said 
"The programs we are funding 
Jtave a strong track record for a 
Jiigh level of success" 
j The program began in fall 
£003 under the direction of 
former Provost James Coffman 
3n its first year, the program re- 
ceived 54 pre-proposals Four- 
teen were asked lo submit full 
•proposals and nine received 
funding 

' During this second year of 
lunding, a call for pre-proposals 
went out in September to all fac- 
ility and deans Proposals were 
.considered for cross-departmen- 
tal projects thai involve multi- 
disciplinary themes, projects 
varying in length for up to five 
years, and projects requesting 
$50,000 to $2 million. 

.- The program received 22 pre- 
proposals The pre-proposals 
were sent to reviewers qualified 
in the respective fields The re- 
viewers recommended that the 
pre-proposals continued in the 
process or were turned down 

Eleven pre-proposals were 
asked to submit full proposals 
for further consideration A final 
review panel discussed the ma- 
terials and made a recommenda- 
tion to the provost. 

The six projects to receive 
funding represent the humani- 
ties, social sciences and physi- 
cal sciences Proposals were 
evaluated for several criteria en- 
compassing cutting-edge ideas, 
achievement potential, estab- 
lishment of collaborations to en- 



11)4 CHt*t»* 

irm mtrn 
Fit i7ie mint 




hance the project and external 
funding potential. 

According to the Targeted 
Excellence standards, the goal 
of the program is to enhance 
collaborative efforts in the uni- 
versity community to reach top- 
10 status by 2015 

K- Stale's national status is 
determined by nationally rec- 
ognized publications that illus- 
trate universities' progress in re- 
search, teaching, infrastructure 
and technology 

University administrators 
annually provide academic in 
formation to the University of 
Florida, where it is compared to 
other land-grant institutions 

"Through that data, we can 
analyze our position," Nellis 
said "Right now we're 12th or 
13th, depending on if you in- 
clude student scholars The Uni- 
versity of Florida doesn't collect 
data on student scholars We are 
the top scholar - Rhodes, Tru- 
man, Marshall, Gold water and 
others - institution ft is one of 
the variables with think is im- 
portant" 

The funding for the Target- 
ed Excellence program is ear- 
marked by the administration. 

"It is part of the general fund 
budget" Nellis said "So, essen- 
tially it is part of student tuition 
money. Each year there is a re- 
view by Student Senate of the 
overall plan We get their en- 
dorsement for the funding " 

The funding makes up about 
1 percent of university expend! 
lures, Nellis said 

"This funding allows faculty 
to compete for other external 
funding," he said "Without 



Targeted Excellence, it would 
be much harder for them to be 
competitive. 

"They can leverage these dol- 
lars to get other funding One 
project from last year - Enhanc- 
ing Military History and Secu- 
rity Studies - was able to take 
this money and invest it and had 
leverage to get more than $2 
million in federal funding" 

The Geospatial Technol- 
ogy Infrastructure Enhancement 
project plans to use its funding 
award to attain federal research 
moneys, said project co-leader 
John Harrington, professor in 
geography 

"This funding will help us 
better prepare proposals when 
they are called for by the US DA, 
National Science Foundation, 
Homeland Security or others," 
Harrington said "We will be 
better able to respond when the 
requests come in " 

The Geospatial project is 
spearheaded by geography pro- 
fessors, but Harrington said their 
research group includes faculty 
from many colleges on campus. 

"Quite a bit of science is 
more integrated with new teams 
of scientists working together," 
Nellis said. "The Targeted Ex- 
cellence program is ineeittiving 
that by funding teams working 
across disciplines." 

The program not unique to 
K-State, but is a rarity 

"We've had the strongest af- 
firmations from the reviewers 
and panel members,' Assistant 
Provost Al Cochran said 'Many 
communicate that (hey wish 
they had something like this at 
their universities." 



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Fast Facts 

200405 Funding Results 

12 pff-pcoftwak 

1 1 chosen to submit hill proposals 

6 proposals reenvr funding over a ftvt yrar 

period 

Center for Sensors and Sensor Sp terns 
$ 1,SW,W0 

Principle investigators Gurdip Singh, professor 
in computing and mformaUort sciences; Douglas 
McGregor, associate professor in mechanical 
and nuclear engineering, and James tdejar, 
professor in chemical engirteenng 
Toe project looks at studies for sensors 
design am) fabrication, incorporates sensor 
components into systems and develops sensor 
networking 

(enter for the Understanding of Origins 
S4«,QO0 

Prinnple invest I garors Tun Bolton, professor in 
physics, Carolyn Ferguson, assistant professor in 
biology; Bruce Glymow, associate professor m 
philosophy, and Srmi Kambhampati, professor 
in entomology 
f amity from seven department — otology, 



English, entomology, geology, history philoso 
phy and physics — ywil conduct research and 
scholarship of ongins through the perspec 
iwes of humanists and scientists They plan to 
develop new structures to lie the sciences to the 
humanities 

Geospatial Technology Infrastructure 

Enha-.;emeflt 

S5,SW,0Q0 

Pnociple investigators 1 M Shawn Huicninson, 

assistant professor m geography, and lohn 

Harrington, professor in geography 

The project will establish a research center 

for geospatial technology and applications, 

especially focusing on agriculture, bin secunry. 

biosciences and environmental quality 

Institute for Civic Discourse and Democ 

racy 

M5WN 

Principle investigator David Procter, Speech 
i omrnunn ation, Theater and Dance Depart 
merit head 

The project will improve dernociatUation 
locally, nationally and internationally through 
impioved communication processes, promote 
ciw engagement, improve quality at political 
communication and increase understanding 



of the relationship of discourse to democratic 
decision-making 

Strategically Positioning K State to Ben 
efit from NSF s CUAHSI. NEON Programs 

m\ 

Principle investigators David Steward, associate 
professor in civil engirwiing inhn Blair, protes- 
tor in biology, and tames Koelliker professor in 
bWogual and agm ultuial engineering 
The National Science foundation is creating 
science observatories through its GmoRkflUal 
Universities tor the Advancement of Hyrii 
Sciences and National f • (ungual lHnervaton 
Network programs Thr. ptojei ' HBH 18 put 
K Slate in a position to receive an otucivatory 

Targeted fxellence in Ecological Genom- 
ics 

$2,000,000 

Pnnciplr invest igarors lotena lohnson associ- 
ate professor in biology and Michael Herman, 
associate professor intwiliiqy 
This proiect studies ecological gerwmws. 
an emerging held that includes genetics, 
biochemistry, nrgantsmalbinliqt inaiiimv and 
morphology, ecology and behavicn The protect 
focuses on the genetic basis ol etotogKdl 
i liter actions 






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OPINION 



pOil 

editorial selected 
and debated by 
the editorial board 
and written after a 
majority opinion is 
formed. This is the 
Collegian's official 
opinion 

Johanna Barnes 
J. Scott Bowman 
Scott Seel 
Bill Wall 



Page 4 

TO THE POINT 

Court order 

forces talk of 

education funds 

Kansas lawmakers will return to To 
peka on June 22, forced back to work by 
the state Supreme Court in order to ade- 
quately fund education. The legislature's 
poor handling of education has brought 
them face-to-face with 
the judiciary in a dan- 
gerous showdown. 

It is time for the 
legislature to focus 
on funding Kansas 
schools, put aside the 
stubborn partisan bick- 
ering and accomplish 
the goals laid out by 
the court. 

Governor Sebelius said Monday that 
the legislature should undertake the spe- 
cial session not as Republicans or Dem- 
ocrats, and that "it's clear that partisan 
■plans don't work." 

While budget cuts or raising income 
taxes may not be desirable topics for the 
legislature, education is an issue of the 
highest priority. Obviously the Supreme 
Court agrees. 

Although it has taken a court order to 
force Kansas legislators to talk seriously 
about education funding, the resulting 
conflict between the congress and the 
courts sets a risky precedent for contro- 
versial issues in the future. 

Education funding in this state is 
an extraordinary circumstance, but all 
courts should be extremely cautious 
about delving into legislative matters. 
Only when it is absolutely necessary 
should the judiciary encroach upon leg- 
islative territory. 

The Kansas Supreme Court has made 
a bold move in ordering the legislature 
to properly fund education. Their deci- 
sion stated "We cannot continue to ask 
current Kansas students to 'be patient.' 
The time for their education is now." 

It is also time for our legislators to do 
their jobs and provide the money that 
Kansas students need. 



WRITE TO US 

The Collegian welcomes your letters to the editor They can be 
submitted by e -mail to (oHtgkmntwi&ohQoam. or In person 
to Kedzie 116 Please include your full name, year in school and 
major Letters should be limited to 250 words. All submitted 
letters may be edited for length and clarity 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Wednesday, June 8, 2005 



£C 



IAN S AS STAIE 

OLLEGIAN 



Soft Seat 4. Scot! I 

rHTMKKHIEr UMUUMCMDI 



tuna mototDnoi 



CONTACT US 

Kansas State Collegian Classified ads 532-tKS 

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Manhattan, KS M542 takgtontws&almam 

Display ads 5J24SW Delivery problems 5)2-6555 



Galactic politics 



Critics of Lucas' 
commentary mistaken 



as relca 



\% *A 

JESSE MANNING 



When the original "Star Wars" was released 
in 1977, it instantly took on 
the sort of timeless quality 
found in olher great "good 
versus evil" stories - a dualism 
seen in writings from the Bible 
to "Beowulf" to "Harry Pot- 
ter." 

Behind the special effects 
and mindless action, George Lucas wrote an 
easily understandable contrast of good and bad, 
light and dark, the Forte versus the Dark Side 

The completed "Star Wars" preuuel trilogy 
goes much further Everything in Episodes I 
through III is expanded upon, including the 
"good versus evil" mantra which grows rOOfl 
political but no less timeless 

"Revenge of the Sith" makes a subtle but 
powerful statement against abuses and consoli- 
dation of power within government, and the 
icing on the cake is so much action and special 
effects that most people don't even catch the 
politics. 

But they're definitely there Here's the brief- 
est of summaries; a long war causes unrest in 
the galaxy, a frustrated Senate gives its leader 
more and more executive power to deal with the 
war expeditiously and the Senate's leader turns 
out to be evil, eventually purging the galaxy of 
opposition. In short, the bad guys win 

George Lucas isn't the originator ot this 
story; he's simply modeled the "Star Wars" 
universe after history's best examples 

And it didn't take long for our own 
modern-day Sith - who only deal 



in absolutes - to attack "Star Wars" for being 
anti-Bush A USA Today story that ran before 
the i> i' SWi cautioned that conservatives 

iiku be offended by what many considered a 
liberal critique of George Bush's president v 

Well, let's see; Darth SldlotU manufactured 
a war in order to gain sympathy, popularity and 
have power stripped from democratic institu- 
tions and given to him, 

President Bush persuaded the country to go 
to war with Iraq for an ever-changing variety of 
reasons. The Patriot Act was passed at his urg- 
ing, and critics say the legislation has damaged 
our civil liberties. 

Sidious then turned on the noble Jedi to 
justify bis creation of a galactic empire, much as 
conservatives have turned OK the media, minori- 
ties and Democrats in order to 

justify I heir con- j/tflffifffjK. lmtUl1 
much toward d$n\\\\lll////\^_ the 

right 

So lid the 

unabash- 
edly liberal 
George 

Lucas 

put* 

potaty 

make 
Epi- 



sode Ilia shot at George Bush? 

Since the basic plot for the prequets has been 
developed since the 1970s, chances are slim that 
it is a critique of the Bush administration 

Instead of tailoring the movie to current 
political climates, it's more likely that certain 
elements of the Bush Administration are simply 
- almost eerily - fitting the mold that "Revenge 
of the Sith" does aim to criticize. 

At its political heart and soul, "Star Wars" 
isn't about modern day conservatives or liberals. 
It's about an age-old formula that has produced 
tome of Earth's most oppressive governments. 
"Revenge of the Sith" provides closure to an 
ominous warning packed into a world of action 
and fantasy: keep a careful watch on our gov- 
ernment, even when they claim to have our best 
interests in mind It doesn't take a Sith Lord to 
dupe a misguided public into forgoing cherished 
freedoms for a little peace of mind. 

In fact, it only takes an inbred Roman patri- 
cian, or an occult -practicing anti-Semite or 
maybe even a C- average graduate from Yale 
The deeper lessons of "Star Wars" are ap- 
plicable for (he past, present and future. And 
if the political mumbo- jumbo is too much to 
handle, it's a pretty dam good movie with 
your brain turned off 

But if that's how you handle a bit of 
challenging political thinking, don't be 
surprised when one day we have our own 
emperor at the helm. 



Jess* Manning h a areduatt In political tdenct 
and history. Pltasc sand your comments to 
opinion o ipubksu. 




Collegian staff welcomes students to Wednesday's entertainment 



immer 2005 

1 

SCOTT Sif L 



Welcome, my friends, to the show that 
never ends. 

This, in all its glory, is the summer 2005 
Kansas State Collegian 

Every Wednesday, we will 
do our very best to provide 
you with an intelligent, accu 
rate and objective source for 
the news that affects K Slate 
and Manhattan, as well as 
state, national and international news 

Or, in any case, providing students with a 
break from the monotonous summer of class, 
work and drinking. You should be studying 
too, by the way. 

For those of you experiencing summer lib 
in Manhattan, just like almost everything else, 
the Collegian operates a little differently. 

The paper will be available once a week for 
your reading pleasure Though we don't have 



the same formal, we try our best to OWN a wide 
range of topics, even without pages specifically 
dedicated to Sports or The Edge 

As a result of our different format during t he 
summer, it is my belief that we will be able to pro- 
vide our readers with a unique perspective on the 
news and events important to K- State, a perspec- 
tive that no other media in the area can offer 

We offer a student perspective on the events 
of the day, but as n weekly, we are able to offer 
a more in depth look at not only Hie events, but 
also the aftermath, a luxury we don't always have 
in the hustle and bustle of a daily p i|> ' 

Though it is an abbreviated version oJ the Col- 
legian you are familiar with, we still take our job 
seriously 

We will still strive each week during our eight- 
week term to improve ourselves, and to provide 
you with better coverage of (he item that matters 

lo yon 



We are your campus newspaper and it to our 
honor to serve you 

Please don't hesitate to contact us with ques- 
tions, comments and concerns. Whether you 
want lo tell us how much we suck - though we 
ask that you do so in a constructive and polite 
manner - or that we're doing a great job or just 
want to say "Hey," we welcome all feedback front! 
our readers. 

If you have feedback, story ideas, letters to the 
editor or any other kinds of concerns, you can 
call 532-6556 or stop by the newsroom in Kedzie 
116. 

From myself, my managing editor J Scott 
Bowman and the rest of the editors and staff, we) 
eume to another fun and exciting Collegian term 
Thanks for taking the time to read our paper. 




CAMPUS FOURUM 395-4444 -or- fourum@spub.ksu.edu 



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Wednesday, June 8, 2005 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



PageS 



Local bars adopt 
dress codes 



By Scott Seel 

KANSMSIA1K0IIIGMN 

_ Deciding what to wear to 
(,tte bars can invulve inure ihan 
just" what lootn giHid 

TVo bars in Aggievilk>, Joe's 
Tap Room and Kile's Bar & 
Qr^l, now have dress codes 
ijiat must be met before patrons 
caii be admitted into the bar 

Kris Smith bar manager at 
Kite's, said their posted dress 
code, which he called a "mild 
dress code," was put in place a 
few months age to help regu- 
late the crowd thai attends the 
bar 

The reasoning behind it is 
a'couple of months ago we had 
problems with the wrong crew 
of people being in here (or the 
atmosphere that we wanted,'' 
Smith said. 

Smith satd he is pleased 
with the effect the dress code 
has had <m the bar. 

Id say it has helped us out," 
he said. 

Nick McKenna, manager of 
Joe's Tap Room said their bar 
has a similar put h\ 

It was just a general rule 
that had always been that way, 
we just didn't really enlurce it," 
-McKenna said 

Me Mid an owner noticed 
i he policy was not being en- 
forced, leading to tin decision 
'u pay mure attention in cus- 
tomer attire. 

We don't want stuff like 
that to run other customer* 
off," McKenna said 

lirell Hamilton, senior in 
electronic journalism, said the 



Did you 
know? 
Dress Codes 

jMfe 

Ho n ooked hats 
No dwwttw shirts 
No bandanas 



Kite's: 

No bandana* 

No wallft (hams 

Nocut-ottorslww 

iMiihlrts 

No crooked halt 

No baggy or wooing 

pants 



policies are not necessary 

"H just makes me wonder 
why they put them in place," 
Hamilton said "I'm not really 
for them I'd like to see if any- 
thing changes because of it. but 
I doubt it " 

i'oli lie's such as this might be 
needed if there were problems 
re I, i led to gangs or oilier sccli 
rily issues, but he said he didn't 
see much reason for them to be 
in effect in Manhattan 

"It's pretty ridiculous, I 
think, I just don't think a dress 
code is guing to prevent that 
kind of thing from happening 

Others, like K-Slate gradu- 
ate Lisa Derks, said the dress 
code is nol ■ big deal 

It really doesn't bother me 
either way," Derks said "A cou- 
ple of the things may be a bit 
extreme, but for the most part 
I think they're nol that big of a 
deal" 

Derks said certain bars at- 
tract certain crowds of people, 
and those who lend to frequent 
Kite's and |oe's probably won't 
moid ths dress code 

It s not like they're real 

hard to comply with," she said 

I think most of the people 

who go to those bars won't be 

bothered by it ." 



Bringing the surf to the streets of Venice 




'Dogtown offers excitement, 
nostalgia for movie audiences 



"Lords of Dogtown" 

* • * & £ 

A movie review by 
J. Scott Bowman 

From the waves to the pave 
men!, "Lords of Dogtown' is a 
movie about legendary southern 
California skateboarders that 
luteinized the skateboard- 
ing movement in the mid-1970s 

|ay \Jams (Emile Hindi), 
Tuny Alva (Victor Rasuk) and 
Stacy I'eralta (|ohn Robinson] 
are three of the prominent, ortgt- 
rial Z-lioys Named after the 
Zephyr Team tliey skated for. 
they Iransfered the aggressive 
wave-riding moves of surfing to 
the concrete streets oi Venice, 
Calif 

The Z'Boyi entered the 1975 
Del Mar Nationals and wowed 
the audience with their maneu- 
Vtrs and became local legends. 

i hey were the firsi toexpcnmenl 

skating in pools because nuim 
su [aiming pools were empty due 
Iti Hit drought in California in 
the '70s 

The movie follows the Z -Hoys' 
introduction to competitive skat 
ing to their rise in fame and in- 
flated egos when they turned 
professional and loured around 
the world 

The movie is a fictionalized 
version of the true story of the Z- 
linys ami it believable (the real 
Stacy IVialki won a Sundance 
id lor his documentary 
Dogtown' about the Z-Boys in 
2001) IVrulla also served as the 
writer and a skate stunt double 



for Lords of Dogtown ." 

Hirscli, Rasuk and Robinson, 
and the other young actors, are 
believable, tough kids living to 
skate, fight and party. They are 
equally believable as innocent 
children that have to face fame 
and fortune at a vulnerable age. 

Though the kids are believ- 
able, the best performance of 
the movie is Heath Ledger as the 
Zephyr surf shop owner, Skip 
Lngbjom Ledger's performance 
personifies what a typical Amer- 
ican would assume could he the 
quintessential surfer, but he adds 
an edge toil. 

Ledger [lis the surfer drawl, 
aits erratically and is eccentric 
with a hint of mild violence 
Though he may not be the most 
morally-admirable character, he 
is likable, believable and is the 
glue holding the movie together. 

'['lie skateboarding scenes, 
both on the street and in com- 
pel it ion. are good, even with the 
less aeronautical, vintage- style 
of skating. 

TftC soundtrack is another 
strength of the movie Along 
with Hendrix, the Allman Broth 
ers Band, Pink Floyd and Social 
Distortion, to name a few, the se 

lection is good 

The action is enough to keep 
younger crowds interested, and 
the drama and music has enough 
substance to make the older 
crowd fed nostalgic and keep 
from nodding off. 

The Lords of Dogtown" is a 
fun movie that, like the charac- 
ters, once you give it a chance, it 
might surprise you. 



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Page 6 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Wednesday, June 8,2005 



Tuttle Creek 

to undergo 

reinforcement 

construction 



8y Joanna Rufokk 

I filAN 

l utile Creek Dam will re- 
ceive reinforcement construc- 
tion tins fill to protect it from 
larger eurthqu,i 

Brian vteNuliy, operations 
managei for tKe US. Army 
Corpi hi Engineer* at TUitle 

Creek. said Mime work is al- 
ready tuiderw 

\1nsi ul the work already 
(bitched or currently under eon 

strut t 1 in preparation for 

project heginning this 
fall, he sine! Preparation work 
includes new campsites and al- 
ternate rou 

McNulty said the dam, when 
forced, will be able to wilh- 
•thquake in 5 7 to 
6b range on the Rithter scale 

The US Mouse of Represen- 
Uth d a bill supplying 

$27 million to the project It 
now gocj before the Senate and 
is part of the Fiscal Year 2006 
f-.nergv and Water Development 
Appropriations Bill. 

' Thais pari of Ihe funding.' 
McNultv said It is a multi-year 
project. 

An additional $2,189,000 
will ilea n" tn Tut tli Creek for 
operation and maintenance. 
McNulty raid this is used to 
keep the lake running. 

1 1 a in st routine, basically 

what we keep mo doors open 

here at the lake wilh ," he said, 

Ihe total eost is expected 

out $206 million, wilh 

i ,is the base pear, said Bill 

Epsom, program manager for 

the Tuttle Creek Dam Safety 

Itsurance Prop 

"Well have to adjust that 
number for inflation and price 
ttges," Epsom said. 

reinforcement will be 
done by injecting cement into 

the s.i iid Inundation of the dam. 
he said 

Epsom said six sirens have 

[p in nearby eommuni- 

in warn residents if a strong 

igh earthquake were to 

break the dam. 

He said (here is about a V 
percent chance oi an earth 
tptake happening in 50 years 

I' about a one in 1,800 
peat event.' Epsom said "Every 
lay the earthquake doesn't hap- 
ihe likelihood of it happen- 
ing lucre* 

Epsom said the fact the gov- 
ernment is funding it shows it is 
i 9erioU9 matter 

"We've requested level fund- 
ing So far we've received at 
least that and more." he said 
The funding indicates that this 
Vforit) lor the national guv- 



Congress shall make no 
law respect iii)> an 
estalilislimenl of religion, 
or prohibiting the I ret 
exercise thereof; or 
ilit idging the freedom of 
speech, or of the press; or 
the right of the people 
peaceably to assemble, 
and to petition the 
I. m eminent for » redress 
of grievances. 

First Amendment 
( V CONSTITUTION 




Specialty clothing store opens to rave reviews 




Catrlna Riwwn | COUEOIAN 
r»nTh*di«. woioi In rtHTwntiry ntucatton, fiiwihirts at Hot took Friday. Th« (tot* 
aptntd H tht Manhattan Town Ccntrt Thursday 



By Scott SmI 

KANSMiTAtKOUEUAIt 

Finally. 

Tara Thacker, senior in el 
enientury education, who has 
been traveling to Topeka to get 
her Hot Topic fix, will be able 
to shop without using quite as 
much gas. 

"I'm really excited," Thacker 
said. "They have really unique 
clothes, their clothes aren't run 
of Ihe mill at all " 

Thacker was one of many 
shoppers at Manhattan Town 
Center to visit the store since it 
opened last week 

Sara Van Allen, marketing 
manager for the mall, said then 
has been a large demand among 



mall customers for the store, 

"For a long time, Hot Topic 
was one of the most requested 
stores in customer surveys," 
Van Allen said "It definitely 
has a niche market that isn't 
serviced right now in Manhat- 
tan Town Center It brings a lot 
of personality to the center." 

The store, she said, benefits 
from Ihe eclectic demograph- 
ies a city like Manhattan can 
offer, combining both the mili- 
tary and college student atmo- 
sphere 

Russ |imcncz, marketing 
manager for Hoi Topic, said 
while he agreed the combina- 
tion of military and college cus- 
tomers was I good mix, he said 
Hut Topic doesn't really focus 



on demographics 

"We're just trying to make 
it more available to people and 
make il easier to find us," li- 
menez said. 

He said Hot Topic strives lo 
offer "Music lifestyle and pop 
culture-influenced apparel" to 
its customers. The company has 
over 600 stores in all 50 states 
and six stores in Puerto Rico 

"We're excited to be in a 
market like Manhattan. Kan.," 
limenez said. 

Hot Topic is not the only new 
addition slated for Manhattan 
Town Center this year Van Al- 
len said national pizza chain 
Old Chicago plans lo move inio 
the space formerly occupied by 
Pier t Imports this fall. 



FORT RILEY | Growth expected 



Continued from Page I 

"We've been working re- 
gionally," he said "It's more 
lhan just Manhattan It's re- 
gional ." 

Additional housing and 
roadway improvements lake 
a little bit to complete, Snead 
said 

"Those kind of things re- 
al lv take months and years 
to complete," he said. "We're 
certainly working to he 
ready " 

Nancy Knopp, Man hat 
tan-Ogden USD J83 school 
board member, said the 
school districts have worked 
together to be prepared also 
She said USD 583 has hired 
five full-time teachers and 
one half time teacher for el- 
ementary schools and i 
materials and supplies have 
been ordered 

"It's difficult because you 
don't really know how many 
students, but we're trying to 
be proactive." Knopp said 



"We've really taken a leader- 
ship role to working with all 
the districts around us." 

David Colburn, vice pres- 
ident of the school board, 
said the increased number 
of student will help offset the 
declining enrollment Man- 
hattan schools have seen the 
last few years. 

One concern is if there 
are many student with spe- 
cial needs, because it might 
stretch their resources thin, 
he said 

Still, all new studenis are 
welcome, Colburn said 

lis a good problem lo 
have, but it doesn't make it 
an easy one," he said. 

Snead said the additional 
military families will benefit 
Manhattan and surrounding 
areas He said it's better than 
decreasing or closing the fort, 

"It's a much better than 
the alternative that could 
have come from the BR AC," 
he said. "It will be a benefit 
to the region " 



LAW I Court decision speculative 



Continued from Page 1 

The legislature, aware of 
the flaw giving capital pun 
ishment increased emphasis, 
could have fixed it when the 
court originally identified 
the problem Based on the 
court's opinion, they chose 
not to 

Many legislators now 
view the failure to act as a 
mistake 

"There was no crystal ball 
good enough in 2001 or 2002 
to foresee that the conn 
was going to do a 180 only 
two years later," said Derek 
Schmidt, majority leader in 
the Kansas Senate, 

I liter said that because of 
the Republican leadership's 
failure to revise the law. the 
court's reversal put them in a 
difficult spot. 

"They were pinning their 
hopes on getting Ihe Kansas 
Supreme Court decision to the 
U.S. Supreme Court, " which 
Ftiter said was a gamble 

The case will not be heard 
before the US Supreme 



Court until October at the 
earliest 

Fitter would only specu- 
late as to how the US Su- 
preme Court justices will 
come down on the matter of 
Kansas' death penalty. 

"They did hand down the 
Koper decision, which struck 
down the Missouri juvenile 
offender death penalty," he 
said 

f liter said Justice An- 
thony Kennedy was the key 
joining the more liberal 
judges against the death pen- 
alty, tn that case, Kennedy 
cited a "national consensus" 
against executing those who 
were under 18 when they 
committed their crimes 

The US Supreme Court 
has ruled against capital 
punishment, "at least in 
terms of imposing the death 
penalty on the mentally re- 
tarded and juvenile offend- 
ers," Fliter said 

"But the Kansas death 
penalty case consists of 
more technical quesn. 
he said 




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LEGISLATURE I Session needed to find solutions 



Continued from Page 1 

"I have no business in finger 
pointing The legislature failed 
in its job and we were all a part 
of it one way or another." Roil/ 
said 

If the legislature chooses to 
do nothing in I his special ses- 
sion, the courts will be forced 
to act. A situation like tins in- 
curred in Arkansas, said foe 
Aistrup, head of the political 



science department said 

Their supreme court made a 
similar decision The legislature 
didn't act, so they assigned it to a 
judge to lake care of it," he said 

Another possible outcome 

Id be ii I lie courts torbid the 

schools from spending money 

causing (hem to delay opening 

in the fall. Aistrup said 

"The supreme court could 
issue an injunction thai basi- 
call? keeps the state money and 



doesn't send it out lo the school 
districts," he said 

Keefover said that il wasn't 
his position to speculate what 
will happen, but said that there 
are other powers that the court 
has For instance they have 
powers of contempt 

Theoretically there are a lot 
of different possibilities that 
could end up happening. In the 
end Aistrup said that he thinks 
cooler heads will prevail. ■ - 




Wednesday, June 8, 2005 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page / 



Celebration unites community 



Historical Manhattanite s cow featured 
in children's book to celebrate 150 years 



By Joanna Rubick 

KANSmiAirtOUEGIAN 

Kids can learn abuut local 
history in a fun way thanks to 
Manhattan author Jan Mcln 
tosh. 

"Isaac's Runaway Cow" is 
based on an actual cow owned 
by Isaac Good now, a founding 
father of Manhattan. Goodnow 
co-founded Bluemont Central 
College, which is now K-Slate 

Mcintosh said she was read 
ing Goodnow's diaries when 
she came up with the idea of 
writing a children's book about 
the cow Sadie Lucinda 

"This is Manhattan's ses- 
quicentennial, and I thought 
it'd be nice for the children to 
have a hook about Kansas,' the 
(aid 

The book was written as 
part of Manhattan and Riley 
County's 150th anniversary 
celebration 

In the diaries, Goodnow 
described the trip Sadie took, 
which is included in the book 

This was Mcintosh's first 
children's book, which is writ- 
ten at an fourth- to sixth grade 
reading level She also co-au- 



thored a book on some of her 
family's genealogy. She said she 
had considered writing a chil- 
dren's book in the past 

I thought about it from time 
to time, and this just seemed 
like a good lime," she said 

Sadie's adventures are his- 
torical fiction with five chapters 
and an epilogue, but two of the 
stories actually happened. The 
time period is around I860 

Goodnow eventually made 
hamburger out of Sadie, but 
that's nut included in her book. 

"You cant put that in a chil- 
dren's book," Mcintosh said "It 
wouldn't be quite appropriate ." 

The book was released in 
May, and Mcintosh said more 
than 100 copies have been 
suki 

Sadie is mil only a charac- 
ter in a book A cow statue was 
purchased and will be taken 
alung for visits with the book, 
Mcintosh said ft was part of 
tlu- parade on Saturday. 

Also included is a quiz of the 
seven stale symbols. Each of 
the symbols are part of illustra- 
tions in the book 

Diane Dollar, local artist, il- 
lustrated the book The cover 



was done in watercolor, and 
pen and ink was used for the 
inside 

Mcintosh said she has been 
friends with Dollar since high 
school They graduated from 
Manhattan High School in 
1951. Dollar stayed in Manhat- 
tan. Mcintosh left and came 
back in 1991. She was an el- 
ementary school teacher and is 
now retired 

Dollar said she has illus- 
trated several other children's 
books. She was a member of 
the KStale Art Department for 
30 years 

She said she is often asked to 
illustrate for children's books 

"1 didn't intend to do it as a 
life-time project, but they keep 
popping out so I keep doing 
them," Dollar said. "It keeps 
me busy " 

Mcintosh's book isn't the 
only book that came out in 
conjunction with the celebra- 
tion, but it is the only known 
children's book, Cheryl Collins, 
director of the Riley County 
Historical Museum. There are 
several adult books dealing 
with the history of the area and 
there will be more to come 



Collins said the book allows 
children to be more involved in 
the celebration 

"We were really pleased be 
cause it gives kids a way to con- 
nect with the celebration," she 
said 

Since Goodnow's diaries 
derived the idea, it makes the 
book even more special, Col- 
lins said 

"I like the idea of using orig- 
inal sources," Collins saul 



ISAAC'S 

RUNAWAY 

COW 





(OURttSY AKT 



150 YEARS | festivities drawn crowds, bring business to community 



Catrin* Rawiori | 

Oif y Hi uqhton of Man lutt an and Mart i n K I ot i b j< h olio pe U la I k b> ■ 1 i > i < i ISO' 

parade Saturday Naughton and Ktouhadi wore uniform) from the RtwfcftMnary Wat 



kstatecolleaian.com 



Continued from Page 1 

Several vendors and per- 
formers were on hand at the 
Celebrate 150! festival Friday, 

Saturday and Sunday 

Musician and storyteller Zerf 
said he's been in a band most of 
his life, but it's been in tlu i 
10 years that he's delved into 
Kansas songs 

"I came about it in an off- 
hand way," Zerf said "1 was in 
Southern California and I had 
learned some Kansas Mings for 
(un and because I was home- 
sick I'd he playing some rock 
ifiginals and slip in a couple 
■ boy songs and it's so rdaU 
l»g So eventually ) just built up 
aTnii pile of songs 1 could play " 

' He said he likes events that 
Celebrate Kansas history, like 
Ihe Festival, because it keeps 
J fie local history alive and even 
tfiough some events might be 
<&CT, it still affetls people 

I hope it's ti wake up call for 
ioint* of the vminger local pen 
sle," Zerf said "Our population 
is so transient that (he history is 
lost or never really known And 
^the older Manhaltanites that 
did know about all of this stuff 
are disappearing." 

* Zerf said teens seem to be 
•lAlo different types of musit, 
bjjt he hope* they bioadcn their 
jflstes and have respect for peo- 
ple who are trying to pass on 
jiistory. 
- I Along with the continuing 



festivities, there was a clas 
sic car show on Sunday that 
brought in a variety of makes 
and models of cars 

Richard Wachler of Tupeka 
had his 1939 Ford Roadster on 
display He said he has attended 
car shows across the nation for 
Ihe past four years, but said he 
liked ihe one Sunday and was 
surprised by the turnout 

"We got here this morn 
ing and we thought it was 
ing to be a no-show," Wac liter 
Slid ' We though! this weather 
scared people away, but then 
it started to pick up around 9, 
and it S turned out to be a great 
shin'. 

Lewis said there was a dis- 
appointing note to the festivi- 
ties due to the fact that one of 
Hie auard-winning floats from 
the parade was vandalized He 
vii'i criminal charges haven't 

been filed, but the group of men 

who contributed more than 200 
hours of labor intend to file 
charges 

Despite the weathcrand ulti 
er uncontrollable setbacks, the 
parade and lestival were suc- 
cessful, Lewis said 

We're very happy and proud 
id what we've done," Lewis said 
The parade was a huge success, 
the exhibitors and vendors are 
happy There were a couple uf 
situations that were nut of our 
control, but we're proud of our 
efforts." 



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Pages 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Wednesday, June 8, 2005 



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Weekend storms leave questions about drainage 



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City officials pleased with systems performance 
despite flooding problems; more fixes to come 



Catrina Rawion | CQIUGIAN 

RjcM Brawn, jumot in biology, and law* Hicks, |unle>r in marketing and employer it lad i Tropical Sno look anon the water that flooded past 
the steps at the vnowtone shop. 



By Scott Seel 

KANSAS STATfttllfOIAN 

A scries of storms bringing 
torrential rains to the Man- 
hattan area in the past week 
caused flooding in some areas 
of the city. 

Laura Hicks, junior in mar 
keting and employee at Tad's 
Tropical Sno, located near Hob- 
by Lobby and Hastings oil the 
cast side of town, said I hey had 
to close early due to flooding. 

"Normally we stay open 
when it's raining," Hicks said, 
"but the water was up to the 
second step of our deck and 
the fire department was trying 
to keep people from driving 
through the water ' 

The city, she said, had re- 
quired them lu construct a deck 
in order to be in that location 
because of the risk of flooding. 



City Engineer [eff Hancock 
said he is happy with the overall 
performance of the city's storm 
water disposal system during 
the past week's storms. 

"I think for the most part, 
our system functioned like it 
should," Hancock said. 

Hancock said there is only 
so much the system can do. 

"Probably the biggest 
factor on this last storm is (hat 
it was just an incredible amount 
of water in a short period of 
lime," Hancock said. 

The ditch which runs along 
Tuttle Creek Boulevard in that 
area is designed as an over- 
flow area for the Kansas river, 
but also to drain storm water 
through a gate under (he levy 
into the river 

"The largest problem we had 
is there is a flood gate where 
the water flows underneath the 



levy, and we had to close lh«t 
gate because the river was up 
loo high," Hancock said 

City Commissioner Mark 
Halesohl said there are several 
problem areas in the system, but 
said he felt the system performs 
well overall. 

"Obviously, for years and 
years and years, there have 
been areas that have been prob- 
lem areas when we get heavy 
rains," Hatesohl said. "If the 
river is up, then the water from 
the river comes backwards." If 
Ihe water comes real hard, real 
fast, sometimes there is only 10 
much the system can do." 

Hancock said the city is in 
the process of designing ret en 
tion ponds to be constructed 
along the ditch near Tad's to 
hold water and prevent such 
events from occurring in the fu- 
ture 



Celebration hindered by rain 



By J. Scott Bowman 
KANSAS ST*T£ COLLEGIAN 

Continuing downpours 
severe winds, lightening and 
the threat of tornadoes caused 
some of the activities in the 
Celebrate 150! Festival to be 
cancelled 

Two of the main attractions 
for the Festival, a performance 
from Grease's Sha Na Na and 



the ti reworks display were the 
main cancellations 

Re-enactments, music and 
acting performances for Friday 
and Saturday night were also 
cancelled, 

Dave Lewis, chairman of 
the Celebrate 150! committee 
said the rain was a problem, 
but the festival was still a suc- 
cess 

He said the fireworks display 



has been rescheduled for Aug 
13, which coincides with the 
last performance of the Arts in 
the Park concert series 

it just given us a chance to 
extend our party," Lewis said, 

"We could have resulted 
uled the fireworks Sunday, but 
we thought it would be too 
quick and we might not gel as 
many people out there But this 
should work out just as well," 



Weekend brings dangerous weather to state 



tHt ASSOCIATED NIBS 

In spite of numerous warn- 
ings of tornadoes, floods and 
storms, damage appeared to be 
relatively light across the state 
on Saturday 

In Manhattan, officials had 
to cancel the city's celebration 
of its 150th anniversary - in 
the second day in a row 

The cancellation was 
prompted by hail, 70-mile-per- 
hour winds and threats of tor- 
nadoes 



Events were also canceled 
on Friday because of heavy 
ruin, but organizers were deter- 
mined to try again on Sunday. 

About 190 customers in 
Manhattan were without pow- 
er Saturday night, Westar offi- 
cials said 

"Monsoon-like" rain hit 
Pottawatomie County, emer- 
gency manager |ohn Boyd said, 
with flooding along U.S. High- 
way 24 and sections of Kansas 
Highway 99 

Flooding also was reported 



in St George and St. Marys 

A funnel cloud was reported 
near Assaria, in central Kan- 
sas, the National Weather Ser- 
vice said. 

But Dean Speaks of Saline 
County Emergency Manage 
menl said no tornadoes had 
been confirmed by late Satur- 
day afternoon. 

Emergency management of- 
ficials reported roads dosed in 
Leavenworth County because 
of flash flooding and power 
poles and trees downed 



Weather creates dangerous surprises 



By Lacey Stow 

KANSAS SUTUOUEGJAN 

The recent rains and flash 
flood warnings in Manhattan 
lately arc only a preview of the 
weather that could come ahead 
in Ihe summer months. 

June is the wettest month 
for Kansas, with an average of 
5.5 inches of rain, according to 
www.counhystudies.us. Sud- 
den outbursts of rain can often 
lead to flash floods 

Mary Knapp, state clima 
tologist, said flash floods can 
occur in a short lime period 
with a small amount of rain, es- 
pecially if the ground is already 
saturated wilh water 

"You may only get a half an 
inch all told, but if that half an 
inch comes in a 15 minute, half 
an hour time frame, and if you 
have saturations, you may get 
flash flooding." Knapp said 

Kansas is likely to see more 
than just rain occur, as it enters 
the time period when severe 
weather occurs most often 

"Our severe storm season 
is generally from April to July 
That's generally when we have 
the severe storms and outbreaks 
of tornadoes," Knapp said. 

Knapp said a severe storm 



is a storm that includes one or 
more of the following factors 
hail that is 5/4 of an inch in di- 
ameter or greater, winds at or 
abuve 45 mph or intense rain 
fall 

"All of those are character- 
istics of a severe storm," Knapp 
said, "and of course severe 
storms can, and often do, pro- 
duce tornadoes." 

Tornadoes haven't been too 
much of a threat to the Manhat- 
tan area lately The last tornado 
to touch down in Manhattan 
was in October 1997. when one 
touched down at the Manhat- 
tan Regional Airport. 

In 2001, a tornado touched 
down in Ogden, and in 2003, 
Wamego. Kan , also had a tor- 
nado touch down. 

Knapp said a bigger, but of 
ten overlooked weather con- 
cern are the high temperatures 
sumuier brings 

With heal indexes reaching 
dangerous levels, heat stroke 
and heat exhaustion become 
more of a risk, Knapp said 
However, people often don't 
think of these things as weather 
risks. 

"People know about severe 
storms and when to take ac 
tion, but they don't know to 



listen to heat warnings," Knapp 
said 

Knapp also listed lightning 
as another underestimated 
weather risk, saying that lighl 
ning causes more fatalities than 
tornadoes. Since lightning is 
more common that tornadoes 
though, most people aren't 
fazed by it 

"Lightning is so frequent 
that people sometimes under- 
L'Miiiiiiic the danger that's asso- 
ciated with it," Knapp said. 

In order to be prepared for 
severe weather, Knapp said to 
stay alert about weather condi- 
tions and monitor them Hav 
ing a plan in mind of what to 
do in a severe stonn situation is 
also a good idea 

Ll. Michael Quintati3r of the 
Riley County Police Depart 
merit also had some advice lor 
severe weather. Knowing how 
and where to seek shelter in a 
tornado situation was one tip 

Another was to be cautious 
of high water flowing QVfl 
roads 

"People in vehicles stmu 
times think they can go over 
flooded roads," Quintsnar said. 
"If there's water on the mad 
stay off of it " 




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Wednesday, June 8, 2005 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 9 



Award brings summer work 



By Leiht* Hansen 

KANSAS 5TMUQI I tGIAN 

Ten K-Staie students may be 
slightly busier this summer than 
they expected 

The students were named 
as McNair scholars, a program 
funded by the federal Higher 
Education Act in which students 
are given the opportunity to re- 
search in their particular field 
with a professor at K-State and 
are also assisted in preparing for 
graduate work, 

Evan Cullens, senior in elec- 
trical engineering, will be work- 
ing on testing a program for a 
radio transaver for future Mars 
rover missions. 

He said he is excited to be able 
to combine his interests in com- 
munications and the integrated 
circuit. 

Most of their work and con- 
struction can only be conducted 
under the lens of a microscope 

Cullens said he is looking for- 



ward to working with all of the 
facilitators of the McNair pro- 
gram He said he appreciates 
their energy and enthusiasm and 
personal interest that they have 
in helping each individual suc- 
ceed. 

Lancelot Watson, junior in 
philosophy and radio-television, 
will be working on the philo- 
sophical issue relating to the in 
teraction of mind and body. 

Walson explained it as: "My 
fingers punch the keys on the 
computer because my mind in 
structed them to do so This hap- 
pened, although my fingers are 
physical and my mind is non- 
physical My non-physical mind 
interacted with my physical body 
and the intended task was ac- 
complished" Rene Descartes 
( 1 596-1650) was the first to bring 
this to lijihl Watson said he feels 
honored to have this chance to 
work hard to turn his academic 
dreams into a reality 



The McNair program was 
started in honor of Ronald E 
McNair, who was an African 
American scholar who worked as 
a physicist and the NASA Space 
Shuttle Program. 

Congress established the pro- 
grant to prepare students from 
groups underrep resented in grad- 
uate schools for doctoral studies 
and college teaching careers 

Fast facts 

Selected McNair Scholars 

M«4|an Masrorro. senior in theater, Hutchinson 

Lancelot Watson, junior in philosophy and 

radio television. Junction City 

Beth Larrabee, senior in psychology, Manhattan 

Pamela Rlodkiewta, senior in nrniobwlooy, 

Manhattan 

William "Matt" Anderson, junto! in philosophy 

and history, Overland Part 

Joseph Lancaster, senior in computer science. 

Riley 

Evan Cullens, senior m decimal engineering. 

Sharon Springs 

Sara Hupp, senior in history, lopeka 

Mathew Leonard, junior in physics, lopeka 



Female orgasms: It's in the genes 



By Emm* Ross 

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS 

LONDON - A woman's 
ability to have an orgasm is 
at least partly determined 
by her genes and can't be* 
blamed entirely on cultural 
influences, new research 
suggests 

Experts say that's likely to 
In interpreted as both good 
and bad news 

It'll be upselting because 
some women will think, 'Oh 
my God, maybe I just can t 
On the other hand it ttlCM 
away a kind of guilt or ptv*> 
sure," said l)r Virginia Sa 
dock, director Of the human 
sexuality program at New 
York University Medical 
Center 

Either way. specialists 
say the Findings don't mean 
women who inherit an un- 
fortunate gene package are 
doomed They mean more 



work, or patience, is required 

The main benefit of discover- 
ing the genetic elements of sex- 
ual function, experts say is to 
help scientists find better treat- 
ments for sexual problems The 
study was reported this week in 
Biology Letters, a journal of the 
Royal Society, Britain's hide 
prudent academy of science 

In ihe study, scientist) from 
St. Thomas' Hospital in London 
senl questionnaires to 4.037 
women who are part of (he Brit 
ish twin registry. About half of 
(hem were identical twins and 
half were non -identical twins 

One hi thru til the women 
reported never or hardly over 
reaching orgasm during Intel 
course and 21 percent said they 
hardly, if ever, achieve climax 
during masturbation. Those fig- 
ures are consistent with other 
surveys conducted over the last 
few decades. 

But the questionnaires re 



vealed significant genetic influ 
ettce on lite ability to reach or 
easin. said lead researcher Tim 
Spector, a generic epidemiolo- 
gist at Si Thomas Hospital 

The similarity in orgasm ex 
perience was greater in identi- 
cal twins than it was in non 
identical (wins, Spector said 
Because the only difference 
between the two groups was 
genetic, (he researchers con- 
cluded that the gap between tin 
groups was the genetic compo 
nenl. 

After taking into account 
other factors that could tnflu 
ence orgasm, the scientists M 
timated that 34 percent of the 
difficulty women face in reach- 
ing orgasm during intercourse 

is due to grsnei 

Problems in sexual response 
during masturbation seemed lo 
be non genetically influenced 
than orgasm ability during in- 
terior i 



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We require a form of pic 
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For Rent- 
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Manhattan City Ordtn|nce 
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200 

serv ice 

directory 

300 

employmen t/ 
opportunities 



Help Wanted 

The Collegian cannot veri- 
fy ihe financial potential ol 
advertisements in the Em- 
ployment/Career classifi- 
cation Readers are ad- 
vised to approach any 
such employment oppor- 
tunity with reasonable 
caution. The Collegian 
urges our readers to con- 
tact the Better Business 
Bureau. 501 SE Jefferson. 
Topaks. KS 88607-1190. 
(785)233-0454 

Manhattan City Ordinance 
4614 assures every per- 
son equal opportunity In 

securing and holding em- 
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work or labor lor which 
ha/ she is properly quali- 
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3101 



Help Wanted 

CAREER AND Employment 

seeks Gi 
Assistant tor 2005 2006 
acadeir i )e indi- 

vidual advising to students 
U coiifciyns on ca- 
uvung |Ob i 

job issue 

It workshops. 

■ 

Providi- in pro- 

ipecial 
i e Backpack to 
Me the 
Dining Etiquette, 
Career Fairs. Open House 
Appointment is 1 8 hours per 
week lor 9 months and pro- 
vides m -stale tuition eligibili- 
ty Those planning to ba 
idtnts at Kan- 
Utihwnay tor 
2005- 2006 school year are 
encouraged to app>v 
ground m counseling, stu- 
dent development 
man resources helpful 
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Help Wantftd 

HEti' WAMtlJ PART. 
TIME RECEPTIONi 

Ford Lincoln-Met 
cun/ has an encellenl oppor- 
tunity available tor a part 
Ifcna. rejrapfioniH Tin- peji 
ton requires an energetic in- 
dividual who Mies lo work 
with people and an] 
But ,■ |i i >, <: i nrjpraj wort 

envifonmeril The applicant 
must be able to wort trom 
4 30 pm until a 00 pm Mon 
day through Friday, and 
8 00 am to 6:00 pm Satur 
day (work three Saturdays 
and oh the fourth Saluioay) 
it ions include 1 1 
ahilrty to answer communi- 
cate with Ihe caller and 
iransler telephone calls to 
the correct individual 2\ 
some knowledge ol the 
wofklnga ol a tastpaeed 
buimess office, including 
some computer skills 3) the 
willingness lo learn venous 
office dukes as may be re- 
quired Apply m person at 
DICK EDWARDS FORD 
LIMCOLN-MERCURV 7920 
E Hwy 24 Manna' 
Wi." an* , Alcohol 

Free Workplace and Equal 
rtunity Employer 

USD 3?B Hiley County is 
ng applications tor 

ley County High 

1 Becky F-. 
1785)485-4000 01 

&OillU7&uvJ378 org Appli- 
cations accepted until posi 

"'.-,■ iiinty --i 
ins lor 

lor Riley C iunl) limit 

School Contact Becky Pulli 

■ i^!:.-4000 or 

B OHJ Appli 

ill pOSl- 
ll^'l 17S nitey County a 
(ilitations for 

"ui Rlkty County Middle 

. . k. v PoW 

Ol 

. Appli- 

iirlly • 

accepting applical 

Full lime and SubsliluM Bus 

Dnvers Contact Becky I 'nil.' 

: '85 1485-4000 or 

cations accepled until posi- 
tion II tilled 



3301 

Business 
Opportunities 

The Collegian cannot veri- 
fy the financial potential of 
advertisements in the Em- 
ploy men I/Career claaaiti- 
calion Readers arc ad- 
vised to approach any 
such business opportuni- 
ty with reasonable cau- 
tion. The Collegian urges 
our readers lo contact the 
Better Business Bureau. 
5D1 SE Jefferson, Topeka, 
KS 86607-1190. < 785)232- 
0454. 



400 

open 

markel 



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Deadlines 

Oassfflei] mk, HMl i>e 
placed by noon the day 
before you want your ad 
lo run. Classified disptay 
adi must be placed by 
4pm two woikinf days 
prior lo the dale you want 
your ad in run 

CAU 532-6555 



ClasstfiedRATES 

1DAY 

20 words of less 
t&SS 

each word ovet 20 
20c per word 

2 DAYS 

20 words or less 

S965 

each word over 20 

25C per word 

3 DAYS 

20 words or less 
111.30 

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4 DAYS 

20 words or less 

$12 50 

each word over 20 

35c per word 

5 DAYS 
20 words or less 

SI 3 60 

each word over 20 

40c per word 

i consecutive day rate I 



TO PLACE AN AD 

Go to Kedzie 103 

(across from Ihe 

K-State Student Union) 

Office hours are 

Monday fhrough Friday 

from 8 a. rn to 5 p.m. 

The office is open 

except on holidays 



HOW TO PAY 

All classifieds must be 

paid m advance unless 

you have an account 

with Student 

Publications Inc 

Cash, a- 

MasterCard or Visa are 

accepted There Is a 

$10 service change on 

all relumed checks 

We reserve the nojhl to 

edii reject or properly 

classify any ad. 



FREE FOUND ADS 

As a service to you. we 

run lound ads tor three 

days free ol charge. 

CORRECTIONS 
H you find an error in 
your ad, please cad us 
We accept responsi- 
bility only lor the first 
wrong insertion. 

CANCELLATIONS 

It you self your item 

before your ad has 

expired, we will relund 

you lor the remaining 

days. You must ca". us 

before noon Ihe day 

before the ad ts to be 

published. 



HEADLINES 

For an extra charge, 

*•! Put a hearJine 
above your ad to catch! 
the reader's attrition 



I 






Pa 



Page 10 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



| Wednesday, June 8, 2005 



fb 










STAT 




Sub E*P D aU ' 
Kansas Slate Historical Society 
Newspaper Section 
PO Box 3585 
TopehaKS 66601 



3| 



i neater renovations 
improve seating, 
ticket counters 



Pat/at 







www kstatecol Icgian com 



Wednesday, June 15,2005 



Vol 1 04 No 160 



Colleg ians's lawsuit dismissed; First Amendment not violated 



By Jess* Manning 

KANSAS SHU COL I (WAN 

A federal district court ruled that 
two K-State officials did not violate for- 
mer Collegian adviser Ron Johnson's 
and student editors' First Amendment 
rights. 

The case - brought by Johnson and 
two former Collegian editors against 
Todd Simon, former director of the 
school of journalism and mass com- 
munications, and Steve White, dean of 
the College of Arts and Sciences - was 
dismissed on June 7. 



In her decision, U.S. District Court 
Judge Julie Robinson ruled that while 
defendants White and Simon may have 
violated Johnson's employment con- 
tract and overstepped the policies of 
Student Publications, Inc., the plain- 
tiffs did not prove they were denied 
any Constitutional rights. 

With a First Amendment violation 
no longer in question, "the Court is 
thus without federal question jurisdic- 
tion," the ruling stated 

Former Collegian editor in chief Ka- 
tie Lane hied the lawsuit with Johnson 
in June 2004, shortly after |ohnson was 



dismissed as the Collegian's adviser. 

Former managing editor Sarah Rice 
joined the case in July 2004 

Citing an overall drop in the Col 
legian's quality, Simon recommended 
Johnson's dismissal to White. Lane 
and Rice said the recommendation 
was based on content, and Johnson's 
dismissal was the result of months of 
questions regarding the Collegian's di- 
versity coverage 

The court did not agree. 

"We were prepared Tot the case to 
be dismissed but we're obviously dis- 
appointed," Rice said. "I think we stilt 



have a good case and not only is it im- 
portant (or K-State, it's important in 
the precedent it might set for college 
journalists across the country." 

White said he <s pleased with the 
court's decision to dismiss the case. 

"I think (Robinson) made the right 
decision," he said. "There were no First 
Amendment violations and no evi- 
dence that suggested otherwise " 

White also defended the respect 
that the First Amendment is given at 
K-State 

"I feel very strongly about the im- 
portance of the First Amendment, and 



to my knowledge, no administrators at 
KSU have violated it," he said. 

Lane said she disagreed 

"We were being punished for the 
choices we made about what went into 
our paper," she said. "Even after the 
act of his removal, things changed in 
the newsroom People were fearful of 
the consequences of our actions. The 
chilling effect was obvious, and the ac- 
tion taken hy the university was illegal 
That's when we decided to bring a suit 
to right the injustice " 

SeeADVbfRPjgeS 



Military jury 
gives life 

sentence to 
soldier 



By John Ml I bum 

THEASSQCIMIDWBS 

FORT RILEY, Kan. - An Army ser 
geant convicted of shooting two fellow 
soldiers to death last year at his farm- 
house will serve life in prison with no 
chance of parole, a military jury decid- 
ed Saturday. 

Sgt. Aaron Stanley, a 23-year-old 
veteran of the Iraq war, was sentenced 
a day after his conviction by the same 
eight jurors on two counts of premedi- 
tated murder. They deliberated about 
six hours over his 
sentence - and only 
three hours over his 
guilt 

"These were ex 
traordtnarily vio 
lent and senseless 
murders," Maj. John 
flamner, the lead 
prosecutor, told the 
panel 

Stanley was con- 
victed of killing Staff 
Sgt Matthew Werner, 
30, of Oxnard, Calif , and Spc Chris- 
topher D llymer, 23, of Nevada, Mo , 
in September in Clay Center, about 30 
miles west of Fort Riley. 

Stanley, of Bismarck, N.D., argued 
he acted in self-defense and to protect 
another soldier who was there, but 
prosecutors said he shot the two men 
to conceal an illegal drug trafficking 
operation, believing the victims to be 
informants for I-urt Riley police Stan- 
ley and the other soldier, Sgt. Eric Col 
vin, had acknowledged manufacturing 
methamphetamine and growing man 
juanu at the farmhouse. 

Stanley wiped a few tears from 
his eyes but otherwise was composed 
when the jury announced its decision 

"It's OK," he told a half-dozen fam- 
ily members seated behind him 

He patted them on their backs, add- 
ing, "It's not the end of the world Re 
lax" 

But his family members gasped 
when the sentence was announced 
All were either shaking or crying after- 
ward. 

W SOLDIER P*fl« 6 




Stan'»y 

mam 



Following the storm 




Draw Rose | cotltCiAN 
Uqtenk^jtnltoHwgr<H»nd*i*toundef*locm moves rhmi^ Pr*dpftationinJun«Mcrftu«d*yw*s,J1 Winches, Lt»t*un1ifnMle»«rwof<WinJufi#.M^Kri*pp,rtJt*d»iMtoto9Bt. Mid 

Local residents contribute to weather reporting 



By Joanna Rub.ck 

KANSAS STATE COL LEGHH 

Some K-Staters contribute to keep- 
ing Kansans safe during summer 
storms. 

From storm spotting to checking 
the high and low temperature fur the 
day, many people are involved in the 
process, 

Tim Stoecklein, assistant director 
of recreational services, is a storm 
spotter for a local organization called 
Weather Amateur Radio Network 
that reports to the Topcka National 
Weather Service 



Stoecklein said he does it on a vol 
unteer basis and started out because 
he liked watching the weather. 

WARN volunteers go to designated 
areas when serious weather is ap 
proaching, he said 

"We look for areas that would 
be high visibility," Stoecklein said 
"The majority are on the outskirts of 
town" 

One such area is the scenic outlook 
outside of Manhattan on Highway 
177, because there is high visibility, he 
said 

WARN uses Ham radios to activate 
the group and call in reports, Stoeck- 



lein said. 

"If eminent weather is threatening, 
everybody kind of pays attention," he 
said. 

Besides being a storm spoiicr. 
Stoecklein said he lakes pictures of 
lightning and will chase storms occa- 
sionally. 

He said his family will sometimes 
go with him when he takes pictures. 

■ They understand that when the 
weather gu .. kind of nasty J disap 
pear, and sometimes they ride along," 
Sloecklein said 

Mary Knapp, state climatologist, 
said June has been a very wet month 



Knapp reports the official high and 
low temperatures in Manhattan each 
day and checks the rainfall. 

This June is one of the wettest Junes 
for Manhattan, which followed a few 
very dry months, Knapp said. 

"We started out the beginning of 
the wet season extremely dry" she 
said "It's not the wettest June. yet. 
We're in the top five even if we don't 
get any more rain ." 

Knapp said March, April and May 
were the driest Manhattan has on re- 
cord, which goes back to 1890 

See STORMS Pw* 10 



K-State track team caps off season with Ail-American performances in California 



By Jonathan Carta* 

KANSAS SHIICOLLIGIAN 

The K-State track team wrapped up its season this 
weekend as four Wildcats earned All-America hon- 
ors at the NCAA Outdoor Championships in Sacra- 
mento, Calif. 

The meet, held at the Alex G Spanos Sports 
Complex, ran from June 8-11 There were 13 Wild- 
cats who qualified to go to the National Champion- 
ships in Sacramento. 

Junior Kyle Lancaster was named an All- Ameri- 
can for the third time, placing fifth in the men's high 



jump. Lancaster, a native of Fort Scott, Kansas, had 
a jump of 7-0.375 feet 

Redshirt freshman Laci Heller also was named 
an All-American with an eighth place finish in the 
women's hammer throw, Heller, of Meriden, Kan., 
had her second-best performance of the season 
with a distance of 199-09. 

Junior Breanna Eveland was named an All 
American with a fourth place finish in the women's 
pole vault. Eveland became the first female Wildcat 
to clear 14 feet with a height of 14 125 feet. 

Senior Chaytan Hilt capped off her career as a 
Wildcat with a seventb place finish in the women's 



triple jump. Hill earned her sixth A 11 -American 
honor overall and her third in outdoor events with 
a jump of 43-7.25. 

Others who qualified for Nationals were sopho 
mores Lisi Maurer in the 100-meter hurdles. Can- 
dice Mills in the long jump, Shunte Thomas in the 
400, juniors Stelios Kapsalis in the triple jump, 
T.J. Staab in the shot put. Josh Sheer in the javelin. 
Christian Smith in the 800 and 1500, and seniors 
Matthew Che sang in the 10,000 and Lysaira Ro- 
man Del Valle in the 800. 

The women's team tied for 29th overall while the 
men finished 46th 




■ramni Ewtand, 
shown her* compel 
login the pole vavh 
sttheWMHiyhtt 

Invitational in May 
2M4, hat tamed 

Mt-AflMftQ hOFWMV 

Draw Rom] 

COUKiUi 



Today 



O 



High K 
Low 62 



Thursday 

:a rtpk High 83 

Low 62 



NEWS HIGHLIGHTS 



Quake in California 

A rnajweailtiguate struck about 
SO mies off the coast of northern 
Ijtfornia on Tuesday night briefly 
prompting a tsunami warning along 
the Pidnc oust, Ihtre were no imme 
dine reports cf damages or injuries 
The 7 O-nvqnNude quite struck at 
atom 7:50 am southwest of the 
twtal (MWNnfty of (mart City 



Nkholsdediftes to testify 

Oklahoma Oty bombing conspirator 
Terry Wchols was called before a 
federal grand Jury In Denver Thursday 
but dedmed to testify, according to 
a published report Mts sister, Susie 
McDonnell, and ei-wtfe, tana PadHk 
confirmed Nichols' appearance before 
the grand Jury They also said Nichols 
fear Ms safety m prison. 



Teen accused of battery 

A high school student who vomited on 
his Spanish teacher has been charged 
with battery against a school official 
The father said tav son didn't mean to 
but had been made uncontrollably III 
bythesuessofonaieiamiProsecu 
tors dam the art was Intentional, and 
the teacher, David young, called the 
act ■outrageous.' 



DON'T FORGET 



■ ApptkjtiwBjrtdae 


■ Father's Day is tone 


today for undergraduate 


It. 


international students 




(residing within the US.) 


■ <*Mt Mates Otaw- 


for fa* H»5 semester. 


tmpM begins tot It 




and continues until hmc 


■ ttrb tatwcMng 


21 in Oty Park, for more 


Ow Watte (GftOWl 


information contact the 


summer workshop begins 


Kansas HutnanttiesCoundl 


today 


1715057-0)59 




Page 2 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Wednesday, June I 5, 2005 



■Claflin. Book* and £cy>4ci 



18H Claflin Rd. 
www.ctaflinbooks com 



k 



(785) 776-3771 
Fax: (785) 776-1009 



Puzzles | Eugene Sheffer 



FOR RELEASE TUESDAY, MAY 24, 2005 



CROSSWORD H\ Eugene Sheffer 



ACROSS 

1 r-ton 
uprise'" 

s/arioty 
8 From the 

top 

12 Buckeye 
Stale 

13 Export 

14 Relocate 

15 Travel 

17 Touma- 
mt" 
format 

18 Banned 
insacti- 

19 Last-page 
phrase 

21 Tested 
me 
WrJBNI 

24 Paint 

25 Finished 

26 Weari- 
some 
com,/ 
lions 

30 Artesian 
appella- 
tion 

31 "Yog 
Were 
Moan! for 
Ms/ 
singer 

32 Strike 

Mirror 
Has—" 



35 'David 

Copper- 
Rtjtf 

character 
38 Ostenta- 
tion 

37 Less 

38 Satf rorv 

rteh 

recipe 

41 Predtca 
ment 

42 October 
stone 

43 "Love Is 
a Many 
Splendor 
ed Thing" 
group 

48 Ascenl 

49 Pitch 

50 Wine's 
bouquet 

51 Sharp 

52 Firmament 
53Tea- 

spoonUji, 
maybe 



DOWN 

1 Cranberry 
territory 

2 "Caught 
nT 

3 Tryihe 
Tokay 

4 Container 

5 Datum 

6 Lemieux 
milieu 

7 Para- 
phrases 

8 One- 



animal 
9 "Uhh-unh" 

10 Square 

11 Make 
one's 
way 

16 Put into 
the mix 

20 Throw 

21 Refusos 
to 

22 Acknowl 
edge 



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29 Cohort 
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31 "Monop- 
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DTQCSJQ, UAE'FF D Q A I T I I- U 

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YetlcnUv'l < rvptmjuip; WHliN I.INtit 

DO VCIll SUPPOSE ALL THEY 
WEAR ARE. DIPI1THONG 1 

Today's Cryptoquip Clue: U equals Y 
HiWZWfOCHm* BOOKS J 4 41 !>xl B«i> tf «t.w»» 

tar BETl 
BS47S 



Crazy Captions 




At the Collegian, we strive to conned our readers with their newspaper in tun and innovative ways. This past 
week we asked for our r worn to * mail tapt wm to the above photo Her* are the response* we received: 

I've oor wood, now where are my nuts?* 2ach ttkfl'. 

"Sassy Furrypanrs, 1, Heps out to smell the air before deddmo. whit coal to wear 'I always check the weather before I 

(jet dressed,' she sard/ Joanna Nubick 



DIVERSIONS 

See how you add up to our musk quiz 



1 Dream of wit drawn of kars Dream of dragons fire 
And of fbmqs ttur wi bite Sleep wtfi one eye opmGrtti- 
ptngyn* DtoWDght* 

4 MeTaMca, Inter Sandman" 

bB^Sat^MeAaWberOsance" 

t.Jutoftie^%-4runqrhel4W- 

2 Ithmk o^ismomgrfttowjue ftm art no crowds in 
thestrmsandnosunwmyownsurnrTwTrresbadeisa 
toot a device. * umw we, I try ««f tadi up to the dry but 
myejiesbum" 

4Godsrruixk,"w(«lewr 

ivNrrwa,-uIhwrn' 

cDetton "My ft<m Summer (Show It)" 

l^urtwtjrjojoMt kwibet I grabbed my nrnr 

All I br.ird weir <Mk, (aUrrT on the cunoete real to. 

Jurricmiinmyur.sUmriwdonrtwojs Bumper to bumper 

tht*MHiescudfed* 

4. Oueen, *TJohemjjn RrupsooV' 

b.VdrriUk-t'kekeBitiy' 

Llhe8uciEyedftefi,1)eyM4iTw- 

4. Tweart rwt hts (xjd on t plkw mide of Conor*. 
4cpn Oh, teelm' n«ybf he"! «ci Wfle beflu ift i (toys. 
oohyMh Oh, fund om.facej the tie sees tirrwiciiinirn't 
Out tmrtur, oh yuh Oh, <brt ojw, he C4n1 hHft whenbrt 
fuppy looks irrune, oh W4ti* 
t(y4rtlOT,*t*eflftow" 

b. Allte in Oiws/Owr How* 

c. Sttoe TempV Wots, Turp«r 



S-thtfus colors cm the nreet. Red, whit* jnd btaeftople 
shufftn' their leet FWipleslfepm m thet shoes 
Hut IhereS t W4mm' sign on the raid 4he*4 IheWs t lot at 
people uym'we'dbe better tjff dead. Donl feel hke SaUn. 
twtlimtoifiernSoltryiokjrartitariywjylan* 
4 Led2rpttrc*SairwaytoHeiWff" 
b Nei VOung, ^odorfti the Free WtefcT 
cODsby.SiiK f^indtbunq'Ohio' 

6 Trfeett*ryhiherT>i»n*cjWssoiJllnsK^ 

kxttrite t ohost town on i moonless summer mghL 

llaMdnps on the wwdsMd thettt 4 storm nwsnqhhrt 

headm' hart fwm sornevvhereltut he wirershouWhive 

wen. 

4 i*oote&(Xm "Neon Moon" 

b BobSeger, Turn the F > »ge" 

c.r J arThlsroolts,'i^rhuncWFWh' 

7"Mam4 tok) me when I was young. Come sit bead* me, my 
o»^son.andtrstenckisetylowh*ls4>And»youdorJiBW 
wl help you some sunny day. lake your time . OonlltwiDO 
tastOouMeswi some and they wi pass. 
GotWawoiTunarrdiwlfmliW.afrfiJontfo^ 
ttat b sotnnnt up abow* 
4. LynyiuSsyrtfid, MmpieMarr" 
b. Smash Mouth, "Wilun' on the Sun" 
c Sitpknot, Dualny' 

How did you do? 

tV 1 : *kjm up the radto, you need more musical eiposuret 
14 four* dotn; okay, but thmos could be better 
S « You> i musical genius* 



lil^S'ctVil-Vi 



The blotter 

Arrests in Riley County 

Reports are taken directly from Riley County Police 
Department's daily logs. The Collegian does not list 
wheel locks or minor traffic violations because of space 
constraints. 

Saturday, June 11 

■ At 12:12 p m , Joseph seaman, (lay Center, was arrested for dmrngon 
a suspended license Bond wis set dt SSOO 

■ At 3:05 p m., Karen Sutton, lopekj, was arrested for failure to appHr. 
Bond was set at 5750. 

■ At «:JQ p.m . Mitthew Vounkin. Riley, was artested lor detimy/manu 
facTurtnq sfmuiited controlled subsiant e , u nlawful possession of depies 
sants/stlinulanKlsaMucinooeniaand Dili Bond was set at 51,500 

■ Al 10:58 p.m., Nathan Hanson, Leonardvltle, was arrested for pen 
session of a simulated controlled substance and unlawful possession of 
dep, rtsants/sMmul jrrts/halludnogenics Bond was set at 5 1 ,500 

Sunday, June 12 

■ At 12 JS a.m., Travis Most. 2404 Stadium Place, Apt. i., was arrested tot 
DUI.BondwassetttSSOO. 

■ At 1 :10 am , tmrfianuel Sciwell, 25J5 Brockman St., was artested for 
failure to appear SaH was set at It W, 

■ At 1:45 am, Bryan Bcnsen, 91 5 Claflin (load, was arrested for QUI 
Bond was set at $500, 

■ At 1:5 J am, Marcus Miles, 244 Westwood Road, was arrested for 
disorderly conduct. Bond was set at 5750. 

■ At U 30 p m„ Ryan Coleman, 250 farm Bureau Road, Lot 202, was 
arrested for failure to appear Bond was set at S 1,000 



Monday, June 13 



■ Ai II 40 am, LeronK* Gto^et, } 300 Marlatt Aw ., Apt 601, was ar- 
rested (or stalking and giving faise alarm Bond was set at 53,000 

■ At 1 pm , Kelly Johnson, 135) Flint Hilts, was arrested for battery Bond 
was set at $500 

■ At 2:40 p m . John (toners, 3641 Osborne Lane, was arrested for prooa 
twn notation Bond was set al $500 



Corrections and 
clarifications 

Corrections and clarificaiioM appear in this stvace II you see 
something that should be corrected, call managing editor 1 Scott 
Bowman at SJ2-65S6 or e-mail tolkgiafmfm@yohoo.(om 



Kansas State Collegian 

(USPS 291 020) The Kansas State Collegian, a student newspaper 
at Kansas State University, ts published by Student Publications 
Int., Kedzie 103, Manhattan, KS 66506 The Collegian is published 
weekdays during the school year and on Wednesdays during 
tne summer Periodical postage is pax) al Manhattan, KS66S02 
POSTMASTER Send address changes to Kansas State Collegian, 
circulation desk, Kedzie 10), Manhattan, KS 665067167. 
C Kansas State Collegian, 2005 



icheewmol to Oteknue 
Ortindo. a WBSWS47S 



Th*Qy|stCtf^««Hi)l«IUtIWO0Wln 

another, II you *** (Hot X equakt O, d w* erauatl O tsrouorwut t* 
pom. Sngfo letirm, that work and words using an ■postroprsa 

SossMonksleyMsI 

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Wednesday, June 1 5, 2005 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Page 3 



Attorney says Jackson won't 
share his bedroom with kids 



By Linda Deutsch 

TMEMSOCIMIDPRBS 

SANTA MARIA, Calif. - 
Michael Jackson's lawyer said 
Tuesday that the pop star is 
Hoing to be more careful from 
now on and not let children 
into his bed anymore because 
"it makes him vulnerable to 
false charges," 

In an interview with The 
Associated Press the morning 
after Jackson's acquittal on all 
counts, Thomas Mesereau Jr. 
said he is convinced that the 
pop star "has never molested 
any child ." 

Mesereau and his colleague 
Susan Yu spoke to the AP by 
telephone, and both defense 
lawyers described Jackson as 
the most vulnerable person 
they have ever met. 

Mesereau said he has been 



baffled by the public's will- 
ingness to believe unfounded 
charges against Jackson 

Because of public percep- 
tions, he said, Jackson will have 
to change his lifestyle. "He's 
going to have to not let people 
easily enter his life. He was very 
generous to people who didn't 
deserve it," Mesereau said. 

As for letting children sleep 
in his bed, "he's not going to do 
that because it makes him vul- 
nerable to false charges." 

Prosecutors were allowed 
to support the allegations that 
Jackson abused the 13-year-old 
in 2003 by bringing in evidence 
of inappropriate behavior with 
other boys, even though those 
purported incidents never led 
to criminal charges. 

Some jurors indicated that 
they were inclined to believe 
Jackson had such a past, but 



that it did not prove the current 
allegations against Jackson 

"He's just not guilty of the 
crimes he's been charged with," 
said Ray Hultman, who told the 
AP he was one of three people 
on the 12-member jury who 
voted to acquit after the oth- 
ers persuaded them there was 
reasonable doubt. "He prob- 
ably has molested boys at some 
point." 

Mesereau and Yu said they 
have not discussed Jackson's 
future with him. Mesereau also 
said that he was first contacted 
by Jackson's family when au- 
thorities raided Neverland in 
late 2003, but he did not take 
over the case until months lat- 
er. 

"1 think we were on the at- 
tack from the opening bell," he 
said. "My strategy was to never 
let up." 



Online program provides advanced degrees 



By Lindsay Porter 

KHftASSIAIUOIU&UN 

A program involving K-Statc 
is growing in more ways than 

one 

The Great Plains Interactive 
Distance Kducation Alliance is 
an inter- institutional program 
i if luring distance education 
master's degrees and post-bac 
ca laureate certiflcatCf in human 
ices. 

It creates a way for universi- 
ties to join together to offer an 

dank program they didn't 
have the capacity to offer alone," 
said Virginia Moxley, found- 
ing member of the Great Plains 
I DBA and assistant dean of hu- 
man ecology "Students still get 
a degree from one university but 
the instruction comes from fac- 
ulty at several universities" 

The program targets profes- 
sionals seeking education for ca- 
M.i i advancement and change 

Students apply at one of the 
partner institutions, enroll, then 
ive the degree from that insli 
tut ion. but online course instruc- 
tion is ted by faculty at several of 
I he partnering universities 

"Our name is the Great Plains 
hiUTiidive Di^ance [Education 
Alliance and interactive was 
chosen very purposefully," Mox- 
ley said "It is an online graduate 
program in every part designed 
io l>e interactive " 

There are three master's de- 
gree programs offered through 
I In- inter institutional program 
and this fall there will be a 
fourth, pending final approval 
by directors and regents 

HISTORY 

The Great Plains I DBA was 

nded in 1994 with the mod- 
cat goal of increasing the access 
of rural professionals to post 
baccalaureate educational op- 
portunities by creating shared 
distance education graduate 

i rata, Moxley said. 

She said the inter institution- 



al collaboration raised the bar 
for distance education program 
ming 

During the first four years, the 
Great Plains IDEA institutions 
worked on their partnerships 
and learned from each other 

An early obstacle was get- 
ting faculty interested in online 
courses. Moxley said for that rea- 
son, the first two years focused 
on educating faculty and admin 
istrative participants about the 
significance of distance educa- 
tion, the changing public percep- 
tion of higher education and the 
technological advances appli- 
cable to educational programs 
through the Internet 

In 1996, the alliance was 
sharing courses and a Web page 
was implemented 

THE BEGINNING 

In 1998, the focus remained 
on meeting needs of profession- 
al audiences, Moxley said, and 
let the alliance to realize those 
needs called for degree programs 
instead of individual courses. 
The alliance spent the next few 
years developing the curricula, 
assigning leaching responsibili- 
ties and setting admissions crite- 
ria 

The first inter-institution.il 
program implemented in 2000 
was financial planning. 

"When 1 came to K- State in 
1999, the alliance faculty was 
just being put together," said 
John Grable, associate profes- 
sor in family studies and human 
services "t am in financial plan- 
ning, so it was a good fit" 

TODAY 

The alliance has included 
youth development and geron- 
tology and is preparing to add 
community development. 

Ray Weiscnburger, associate 
dean of architecture, planning 
and design, said the community 
development program started as 
a larger program, but was scaled 
back to be approved sooner 



Did you know? 

Great Plains I0EA universi- 
ties 

■ Colorado State Uniwntty 

■ Iowa Slat* u"nn*rcit| 

■ tonus State Wvwifcy 

■ law Itch MwrtQ 

■ Mkhiain State Untwntty 

■ Montana State University 

■ llnimsry of Nebraska 

■ North Dakota State University 

■ Oklahoma State University 

■ South Dakota State University 

■ UntvenityolWhconvln 

Multi-institutional aca- 
demic programs 

■ family Financial Wanning: Master's 
degree or graduate (ertifkate 

■ Gtfwrtotogy. 

Matters degree or graduate cwtinaie 

■ Youth PfwtipwMit: 
Masters degree or graduate certmcate 

■ Community Duilitwsnl, (pending 
approval) Master's degree 

Single institution academic 
programs 

■ Family and Consumer Soenrev 
Master i degree from The University of Nebraska 

■ dotting, and T«t»>v 

Masters degree from the University of Nebraska 

■ utotttks; 

Bachelors degree from Kansas State University 

■ Restaurant, Motel and InrtrtutmnaJ 



Master's degree from Texas tech University 



There are currently 200 stu 
den Is working on their master's 
degree through the Great Plains 
IDF A Moxley said more than 40 
of those arc K Stale students. 

Grable said there are students 
from every state in the country 
and even internationally in Eng- 
land, India and Asia pursuing 
online degrees. 

"You do almost everything 
you do in class online," he said 
"There is just not a live human 
being sitting in front of you." 



Retail developments continue 



By Scott SmI 

UNSASSTATttOmGIAN 

Seth Child Commons just 
continues to develop. 

Lyle Butler, president of the 
Manhattan Area Chamber of 
Commerce, said the area is de- 
veloping just as everyone had 
hoped it would. 

The newest construction is 
located just north of the building 
occupied by Pier One. Though 
Butler said he wasn't aware of 
who the tenant were, signs at 
the location indicated it would 
be occupied by financial services 
company Wells Fargo. 

The area is part of a trend of 
expanding restaurant and retail 
stores in Manhattan. 

Butler said Seth Child Com- 
mons would not adversely affect 
places like Westloop Shopping 
Center, even though Baskin 
Robins Ice Cream and Pier One 
have chosen to move from al- 
ready existing locations. 

"I think with the availability 
of retail space that has developed 
in the last five years in Man hat 
tan, some businesses have cho- 
sen to relocate," Butler said. "1 
think that's good, because for 
the most part, there are people 
coming back in and filling up 
the vacant stores" 

Manhattan, he said, along 
with K-State and Port Riley, 
is growing rapidly with more 
growth expected, which has put 
the city on the radar of several 
national chains. 

"Over the next five years, 
we're going to see a great deal 
of increase, not just in national 
and regional retailers and res- 
taurants but changes in some of 
our local and regional retailers 
and restaurants," Butler said 

Though the Chamber of 
Commerce does not directly re- 
cruit specific businesses, Butler 
said they are hoping to continue 
to make Manhattan a regional 
retail center. 




Undsvy Bauman J 1 01 1 (WAN 
Mike (left) and Tom Meyer of IF It Construction, St. touts, prepare paint to be used in the new 
WeNi Fargo Financial office in the Seth Child Commons shopping area 



"Some of the smaller retailers 
do realize it's the large retailers, 
box stores that bring people to 
the market place," he said "The 
smaller retailers attract those 
people while they are here." 

City Commissioner Bruce 
Snead said that tike the Cham- 
ber of Commerce, the city of 
Manhattan does not play a direct 
role in recruiting businesses 

"In terms of what we do to 
enable development, it has to do 
with zoning actions and com- 
prehensive land-t'se plans and 
then redevelopment as well 
Snead said "We are helping to 
enable that kind of redevelop 
ment by the actions we take in 
terms of zoning and funding of 
infrastructure that may enable 
further development" 

Cor example, Snead said the 
roads surrounding Seth Child 
Commons were specifically de- 
signed to enable retail develop- 
ment on the site. 

There is concern, he said, 
with an adverse affect on local 
businesses or existing retail ar 
eas, but Snead said there are no 
major problems at present 

"Certainly we're aware that 
when areas of new development 



open up, businesses may choose 
to relocate there," he said. We 
have to find a balance in that wc 
want all the businesses that are 
here to be successful, we know 
there was and is demand for re 
tail and restaurant .trv.is 01 well 
as demand for other land uses in 
the community We haven't 
vided any incentives to diminish 
lot ;il business" 

Snead said there will he al 
ways be some instability in this 
particular area of the economy, 
so some businesses will not last 

"Competition in the market 
place will lead to the ebb and 
flow of retail and restaurant 
businesses especially ," he said 
"I don't think lli.il urn' doing 
anything that really tweaks the 
marketplace abnormally" 

finally, he said, the city doM 
not play any role in the funding 
or construction of businesses 
coming to (own 

"I think it's important to note 
that in redevelopment, tin 
of lax funds would be for ii> 
structure and not for direct retail 
or restaurant businesses, I think 
there's a misconception that the 
city pays for buildings and it 
does not," he said 



Memorial service for former Collegian editor, 
K-State news director planned for next Tuesday 



By Johanna Barnes 
KANSAS STAU COLLEGIAN 

A memorial service Tuesday 
will honor the life ol a former K- 
State news services director 

There will be a memorial 
service for former director Carl 
Rochat at 3 p.m. Tuesday in the 
K State Student Union Little 
Theater Rochat died May 12 at 
his home in Manhattan a I 86. 

Rochat was bom Sept. 18, 
1918, in Wilsey, Kan He re 
ceived a bachelor of arts degree 
in industrial journalism horn 
Kansas State College in 1940 
He was also the editor ol the 
first Kansas State Collegian 



to win All -America honors in 
spring 1940. 

In 1953. Rochat joined Baa 
staff al K State as an associate 
professor of journalism and di- 
rector of the news bureau. In 
1976, he was promoted to news 
editor of the university relations 
office, and in 1981 was pro 
muted lo the news editor and 
assistant director of the univer 
sity relations office He retired in 
1985 

Rochat brought national and 
international media exposure 
to K State and coordinated the 
media arrangements for the vis 
its of two sitting presidents, a 
past r resident and a sitting vice 



If you go 
Memorial service 



: I p m. luesday 
unwn Little Theater 



president, among other visit 

Members of the Rochat (am 
ily will greet friends following 
the memorial service 

Memorial contribution! mag 
be made to the Kansas Stall 
University Foundation l'>r the 
Carl R Rochat Scholarship 
Fund or the AQ Miller school 
of journalism in (he care al the 
Yo rgensen - M cloan - Lon d e« ■ n I 1 1 
neral Home, 1616 Poyntz Am 



Religion Directory 



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OPINION 



Page 4 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Wednesday, June 15, 2005 



To the point Is an 

editorial selected 
and debated by 
the editorial board 
and written after a 
majority opinion is 
formed. This is the 
Collegian's official 
opinion. 



J. Scott Bowman 
Scott W 



TO THE POINT 
Development must 

keep small 
businesses in mind 



The commercial development in the 
city of Manhattan over the past few 
years has been truly remarkable. 

Everyone involved, directly or indi- 
rectly, from the City and County com- 
missions to zoning 
boards and other 
boards and committees 
and the Chamber of 
Commerce, should be 
commended for their 
service to this city. 

The job creation and 
economic boost result- 
ing from this influx of 
retail establishments is 
undeniable. 

Famous Dave's Barbecue, Target, Wal- 
Mart Supercenter, Panera Bread and 
Home Depot are just a few of the na- 
tional companies that have added Man- 
hattan to the growing list of cities they 
do business with. 

Each of these establishments serve as 
a regional attraction, bringing visitors 
and money into the Manhattan econo- 
my, as well as providing employment for 
the rapidly growing city. 

Though economic development has a 
long list of functional benefits, it can be 
dysfunctional as well. 

For instances, major retail chains like 
Home Depot and Wal-Mart can use 
their incredible buying power to price 
local and regional competitors, which 
many believe are the true sign of a 
strong economy, out of the market 

Though entities like the City Com- 
mission and Manhattan Area Chamber 
of Commerce play no direct role in the 
recruitment of specific businesses to the 
Manhattan market, they certainly have 
an effect on the environment which 
those businesses would consider before 
moving here. 

While such development is crucial 
to the continued prosperity of the city, 
everyone involved should continue to 
maintain a balance which allows for 



WRITE TO US 

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wtwmibi t^n c olkgiann M $yjm,Bm t ct\r\pt!rsan 
roKedde 116. Please Indude your M mm, year In school and 
major Letters should be Mmted to 250 words Al submitted 
letters may be edited for length and dartty. 



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iCrt- 



Democratic Disaster 

Dean leading party to continued failure in elections; 
harsh rhetoric toward Republicans hurts image of Democrats 



* 



JESSf MANNING 



It hasn't been an easy few years 
for the Democratic Party. 

It was hard 
enough for them 
to stomach a Bush 
victory in 2000 
Bush's relatively 
easy re-election 
victory in 2004 
seemed to defy all 
logic, 

And not only have the Demo- 
crats been out of power in Congress 
since 1994, but the Republicans 
actually managed to increase their 
majorities under a Republican pres- 
ident - a political anomaly. 

With their party in disarray, 
it would only make sense for the 
Democrats to seek a unifying per- 
sonality to lead their forces - a heal- 
er, if you will. 

Well, they did choose a doctor. 

Howard Dean, the failed presi- 
dential candidate who drafted 
hippies nationwide to flock to his 
cause, has only been the chairman 
of the Democratic Party for a little 
over four months, and he's already 
making his fellow donkeys cringe 
with shot after verbal shot fired at 
the Republican Party. 

Dean has been under fire for say- 
ing that many Republicans, "have 
not made an honest living in their 
lives." Later, speaking in public to 
a mostly white, Christian nation, 
Dean criticized the Republican 
Party for all acting alike, all looking 
alike and being mostly white and 
Christian. 

White Christians? How offen- 
sive. Can you imagine the expo- 
nentially louder outcry there would 
nave been had any Republican at- 
tempted to stereotype any other 
racial or religious group in such an 
obvious manner? 

Several prominent Democrats 
were quick to distance themselves 
from the man leading their own 
party. Delaware Senator Joseph 
Bid en and House minority leader 
Nancy Pelosi made it clear in tele- 
vision interviews that Dean didn't 
speak for them. 

Moderate Nebraska Sen. Ben 
Nelson said that he was, "very con- 
cerned about anything that is un- 
necessarily divisive" 

New York Sen. Chuck Schumer, 
one of the few Democrats to back 
Dean's recent comments, accused 
the Republicans of trying to create 
a smokescreen with their response. 

The average American doesn't 
care," Schumer said, referring to the 
back -and -forth between Republi- 
cans and Democrats. 

Not so fast. Senator. 

Average Americans are paying 
attention, and they have been pay- 
ing attention, which accounts for 
the recent stream of Republican 
victories. 

Republicans will be sure to seize 
on Dean's comments and bring 
them to the public's attention. 

House majority whip Roy Blunt 
said in a statement, "Howard Dean 
continues to throw some of the most 
below- (he-belt political punches in 
recent memory" It's almost a guar- 
antee that those masses of Republi- 
cans who ensured President Bush's 
re-election feel the tame way that 
Blunt does. 

What Howard Dean and many 
other Democrats are failing to re- 
alize is an entire block of voters 
who are tired of being chastised for 
thinking the way they do. 




They've been told by liberals for the 
last several years that they're igno- 
rant for simply believing what they 
believe. 

And while many ultra-conserva- 
tive voters may not have a detailed 
concept of why they're on the right 
of the political spectrum, telling 
them that they've never made an 
honest living is a pretty poor way 
to begin explaining the Democrats' 



Conservatism is a powerful force 
in America right now, and most 
Democrats have come to the real- 
ization that in order to win elec- 
tions, moderation is necessary 
While Howard Dean isn't a flam 
ing liberal on a lot of issues, he is a 
loudmouth, and an offensive one at 
that 

The identity crisis of the Demo- 
crats continues, and with Dean 



Illustration 
by Jesse Manning 

COUEGIAN 



holding the reins, their ship only 
continues to drift Inflammatory 
comments won't help them win in 
2006, and those Democrats who 
realize the folly of Dean's approach 
would do well to keep him under 
control. 




Sensationalized coverage leaves bad image 



1 hale the national television 
media. 

No, this isn't 
about the Michael 
Jackson trial - al 
though I could 
certainty spend 
(time on that 



JL 



subject - no, celebrity trials have 
taken a back scat to a new form of 



Nowadays, the news that gets 
the ratings is misting persons. 

I'm sure you all know about the 
tragedy that is unfolding in Aroba. 

Natalee Holloway, a Mississippi 
teenager who was vacationing on 
the tropical island with members of 
her recently graduated high school 
dam, hat been missing for more 



No one can argue that the search 
lor Natalee and the subsequent in- 
vestigation Into bar disappearance 
■ rmoortant However, I find my- 



itacalw 



Mtsysj 



HoOowiy's 
ous other 



bum the 

children in 



the 



country 9 

Over the past few months, it 
seems that there has been a story 
of a missing person, usually chil- 
dren, has been on the front page of 
CNN.com every day. 

According to the National Cen- 
ter for Missing and Exploited Chil- 
dren's Web site, wwwmissingkids 
org, an estimated 797,500 children 
were reported musing and 58,200 
were abducted by non-family mem- 
bers in 1999. 

Additionally, a search of the 
site's missing children database 
over the past year resulted in over 
600 results. 

So why the sudden focus on 
these cases? 

With the adoption of the Amber 
Alert system, child abduction caeca 
have gotten gobs of national media 
attention, but is that a good thing? 

In an effort to be one step ahead 
of the other guys, members of the 
media - especially the 
itedla - will do almost 
anything. Oh, by the way, they 



want to help find the missing per- 
son as well. 

In the Holloway case, Aruba 
officials had to publicly scold the 
news media after "unofficial sourc- 
es," which turned out to be one of 
the individuals who was originally 
detained, were cited saying a sus- 
pect had admitted to the crime, 
saying such activity was hindering 
the investigation. 

The national media doesn't care 
about Natalee Holloway any more 
than they do the other 58,199 chil- 
dren abducted by non-family mem- 
bers. They care about ratings. 

By picking certain cases in a 
seemingly arbitrary manner to be 
plastered across the top of CNN's 
Web site, it trivializes those cases 
that weren't selected 

Additionally, this sudden ex- 
plosion of coverage on child ab- 
duction cases seems to portray an 
(mage that instances of such crime 
have risen exponentially in recent 
months, but there is no evidence of 
that. 



By taking these events out of 
context and playing to the emo- 
tional side of Americans, major 
news outlets are forcing other 
smaller outlets to cover the events 
as well and portraying a clouded 
version of the truth. 

Just like every other child who 
was abducted and may or may 
not have had their face plastered 
across the country, Holloway and 
her family deserve justice. But is 
that what this coverage is provid- 
ing? 

If national news outlets truly 
cared about the issue of child ab- 
duction, they would cover every 
case possible, not hist the one here 
and the one there that they think 
appeals to consumers. , 

All news media, from CNN, Poi 
News and MSNBC to a small town 
newspaper, should cover the news 
not what they think Is the most 




I 



Wednesday, June 1 5, 2005 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Pages 



PERSPECTIVES 



Enlisting great Americans 



By Todd Swiss 

DAILY III INI (U IILIN0IS1 

CHAMPAIGN. Ill -Amer- 
icans seem to love their lists. 
From VHl's "100 Most Shock- 
ing Moments in Rock and Roll" 
to El's various lists about Paris 
Hilton. Normally, the celebri- 
ty experts and entertainment 
magazine writers arc allowed 
to make their voices heard, 
and due to a recent list opened 
to the public, I know why. 

America Online, CNN 
and the Discovery Channel 
teamed up to sponsor a list 
of the 100 "Greatest" Ameri- 
cans is compiled through the 
vote of regular Americans. As 
I look through the list, 1 am 
happy to sec such nominees as 
Abraham Lincoln, Albert Ein- 
stein and Martin Luther King 
Jr. However, 1 am mortified by 
some of the people that Ameri- 
cans have chosen to be in such 
an elite group 

Tom Cruise, Tom Hanks, 
Mel Gibson and George Lucas 
were all chosen to be in a list 
with true greats like Franklin 



Roosevelt and Thomas Edi- 
son. I suppose everyone has 
their own definition of "great," 
but a few of these entertainers 
have not received a top prize 
in their respective field! 

Moving on to political hacks 
that made the list, 1 present you 
with Rush Limbaugh and Mi- 
chael Moore Rush Limbaugh 
is the worst of the worst I f 
he is a great American, I am 
afraid to find out what a bad 
American is. 

Michael Moore IS more re 
spectable than Limbaugh, but 
is definitely not what 1 would 
call "great." While I may be 
entertained by Moore's films 
and agree with many of his po 
litical leanings, he is merely a 
liberal with a camera and the 
guts to confront some very 
powerful and famous people 

Now, I must mention the 
plain weird and terrible selec 
tions made by the American 
public 1 present you with Mi- 
chsel Jackson and Dr Phil Mc 
Graw. Jackson has no redeem- 
ing qualities. Surely he made 
some great pop records and 



could do his share of dancing, 
but look at what he has done 

Or. Phi) McGraw may have 
a Ph.D. in psychology, but he 
really has not said a word that 
makes him stick out from my 
mom or dad His "tough love" 
approach is neither unique nor 
new, but 1 guess Americans 
fall for his shtick 

Afterseeingallofthesepeo- 
ple who have broken the law 
and preyed on the less power 
ful, 1 was sure that I could find 
tons of Americans who are 
more deserving of such a title 
and honor. However, I was 
hard pressed to really find any 
really "great" Americans after 
over an hour of brainstorming 
1 guess that there just have not 
been many great Americans. 

This thought led me to two 
conclusions that are sad but 
true: America really is not as 
good as we believe it is, and 
America Online, CNN and 
Discovery Channel should 
have just trimmed their list 
down to 50 because there re 
ally have not been 100 Ameri- 
cans worthy of such praise 



U.S. exit from Iraq ill-advised; 
situation too unpredictable 



By Andy Mt M urray 

NOfttHtRN STAR {NORTHERN ILLINOIS U I 

DEKALB, 111 - On Sunday's 
"Meet the Press." Rep. Curt Wei- 
don, R-Ra , and Sen Joe Biden, 
D-Del., joined other lawmakers 
urging a shift in the Bush ad- 
ministration's Iraq policy. They 
want a timetable for American 
withdrawal. 

So does Rep. Walter Jones, 
R-N.C , the man who coined the 
term "freedom fries " He said on 
ABC's "This Week" he would be 
offering up legislation to set the 
aforementioned timetable. 

There are a number of rea- 
sons why setting a withdrawal 
timetable will not work. 

Pint is the reality of the situ- 
ation on the ground in Iraq. 
What will happen there is not 
dictated by the US. military No 
one can know what Iraq will be 
like a week from today, let alone 
months or years in the future 

Despite the fact that 60 per- 



cent of Americans support a 
withdrawal in a recent Gallup 
poll, the situations in Iraq du 
not permit a rushed movement 
out of that country. 

What such polls really show 
is that 6 out of 10 lonely voters, 
who answer calls from telemar 
keters, think the United States 
should withdraw from Iraq. 

These lonely voters may have 
a better grasp on foreign policy 
than our president, but letting 
til em decide the course of the 
Iraq War is probably not in our 
best interest. It is certainly not 
in the best interest of the Iraqis 

While lawmakers insist on 
this withdrawal date, they spew 
forth nonsense about the war 

Weldon said of Iraq, "Wt 
can't come back to Amenca 
and have our people being con 
vinced that the Iraqi troops are 
prepared to take over, when 
they're not" 

Regardless, Weldon is one of 
the voices calling for a legislated 



withdrawal date 

How can the United States 
possibly withdraw if the Iraqis 
are not ready to take over' 

By trying to put an end date 
on the Iraq War, politicians lull 
(he public into a false sense of 
hope Wh;ii happens when the 
United States still cannot with 
draw by the given date? 

Legislating an exit strategy 
may look good to embattled Re- ' 
publicans heading into the 200b 
mid term elections but it is the 
worst solution for the Iraqis. 

What it comes down to is 
that war is not a circumstance 
that can be contained in an 
IHpndj or timetable 

The wisest thing American 
lawmakers can do is to let the 
military do the job it was asked 
to do Let the commanders 
on the ground decide when to 
leave Politicians and bureau- 
crats should stick to what they 
do best Which is coming up 
with really bad ideas. 



Former alliance with Saddam should be considered 



By Jeremy Othlart 

KJVMMATLWUlYlKJWASTMtUt 

AMES, Iowa - On the other side 
of the world in a small, concrete 
cell, surrounded by iron bars and 
armed guards, sits a man who once 
struck fear in the hearts of millions 
He does not look quite as tough as 
he used to be, when he would fire 
a rifle into the air as he stood on a 
balcony in front of a cheering crowd 
of thousands 

Now he paces the length and 
breadth of a container he may have 
placed political prisoners in at one 
lime; poetic justice some might say, 
but the irony is startling 

In spite of the American pro- 
paganda machine, which portrays 
Saddam Hussein as a monster, when 
stripped of his uniforms, icons, sol- 
diers and wealth, we realize that he 
is just a man, not unlike many other 
middle-aged men He has a sagging 
belly, receding hairline and, prob- 
ably, especially now, his fair share 
of constipation 



It is also difficult to imagine that 
15 years ago he was an important 
U.S. partner in the Middle East. 

This August marks the 15th an- 
niversary of the day things changed 
for Saddam, the day he cast his lot 
and soured his relationship with 
the United States by invading Ku 
wait Up until this time, Hussein 
had been a strategic partner of the 
United States, keeping Iran in check 
and keeping Iraqi crude flowing to 
feed our thirst for oil. 

The relationship began as early 
as 1982, when an Iranian offensive 
was pushing hack the initial victo- 
ries won by Iraq during the Iran- 
Iraq War 

In order to help Iraq beat back 
the Iranians, it was conveniently re- 
moved from the US State Depart- 
ment's list of nations that support 
terrorism and provided with guar- 
anteed loans for U.S commodities. 

In 1983 it was clear to (he United 
States that Iraq was in violation of 
Geneva protocols as it used chemi- 
cal weapons against the Iranians, as 



well as Kurdish insurgents, "almost 
daily" according to one U.S. State 
Department memo 

The response of the United States 
was to send Secretary of Defense 
Donald Rumsfeld as a presidential 
envoy, to meet with Hussein on no 
less than two occasions 

One declassified State Depart- 
ment video (Google "Saddam Hus- 
sein Sourcebook ") shows Rumsfeld 
shaking hands with the dictator 

Iraq's proclivities to use chemi- 
cal weapons were never discussed, 
but strategies to keep Iraqi oil flow- 
ing were 

This strategic relationship con- 
tinued through Saddam's domestic 
purges and gassing of civilians. 

It was only when Iraq invaded 
Kuwait that the former ally became 
a bitter enemy. 

Hundreds of billions of dollars, 
thousands of American lives, and 
15 years later we are still trying to 
make right our former relationship 
with Saddam 1 lussdn. 

As much as we might like to pre- 



tend otherwise, the United States is 
not in the freedom business; it is in 
the security business. Like any na- 
tion, we seek to stack the chips in 
our favor when we can and serves 
our interests, we tend to make deals 
with devils more frequently than we 
would like to admit. 

It is neither right nor wrong that 
we befriended Saddam only to be- 
tray him - in his eyes at least. We 
did what any other country would 
have done in our place We pre- 
ferred Hussein in charge of Iraq's 
oil instead of Iran Principles mean 
little in politics 

When Saddam Hussein is tried, 
and potentially put to death, it wilt 
be impossible for us to fully absolve 
ourselves of our own guilt in the 
matter, having been the nation that 
supported him as long as he played 
by our rules 

Nevertheless, we should keep in 
mind who supported his regime for 
nearly a decade and, for what it is 
worth, have at least some sympathy 
for the devil 



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Page 6 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Wednesday, June 15,2005 



Art classes offer chances 
for all ages, skill levels 



By J. Scott Bowman 

KANSAS SIATt COL I IGIAN 

The Manhattan Arts Center 
offers classes in a variety of me- 
dia, age groups and experience 
levels. 

Classes are offered all year, 
but the summer classes are 
a little different, said Penny 
Senften, executive director of 
the Center. 

"We offer classes year-round, 
but the summer classes are 
structured differently," she said. 
"Enrollment is open for each 
class, but if we don't get enough 
to start a class, then we aren't 
able run it. 

"They start at different times, 
so we don't have a specific time 
for all of the classes, but for 
each one. We first started our 
summer classes on June 5 and 
we have some that start in Au- 
gust." 

The MAC tries to offer a vari- 
ety of classes, including ceram- 
ics, violin, theater and drawing, 
said Brady Miller, program and 
marketing director for the Cen- 
ter. 

"We offer classes for adults," 
Milter said, "but something we 
try to do over the summer is of- 
fer children's courses that are 
week-long courses. That way it's 



easy to fit into schedules and it 
gives them something different 
to do each week." 

He said that if a child is 
signed up fur a class, there is a 
$5 discount for each extra class 
or for a sibling that signs up 
with the child 

Connie Schlageck, art teach- 
er, said she has taught art to 
both children and adults. She 
said she teaches at the Center 
as well as for the Riley County 
School District. 

She said she likes both kinds 
of teaching because she can 
spend more time with her kids, 
but there are differences be- 
tween the two ways of teach- 
ing. 

"When you do your own 
classes you have control to 
teach, but it takes more time," 
Schlageck said. "When you sub- 
stitute teach, you pretty much 
show up and leave, there's no 
planning for the next day's ac- 
tivities" 

Teaching children can be 
stimulating and help her think 
of her next project, Schlageck 
said. 

The best bargain the MAC 
offers is the open ceramics stu- 
dio, which is open 6 to 9 p.m. 
each Sunday and Monday, Julie 
Gibbs, studio technician, said 



Did you know? 
Summer (lasses 

for more information call the MAC at $37- 
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visit their Web site at 
www.manHortanom.org 

She said each session costs 
$5, and a bag of clay costs $7 
with a $10 firing fee She said 
the clay and firing fees may not 
apply to each session since a bag 
of clay can last you longer than 
one session. 

The studio is open for any 
experience level that is 18 years 
of age and older, Gibhs said She 
said children and teenagers may 
be admitted to work at Gibbs' 
discretion 

"We have some professional 
potters that come in and some 
beginners," she said. "It's not a 
class, but if 1 have some time, I 
can give some instruction. 1 try 
to accommodate all that I can." 

Senften said they've had 
good responses from the com- 
munity. 

"It varies quite a bit," she said, 
"but now we have good respons- 
es, which is very encouraging. I 
just hope that lots of people take 
advantage of the opportunities 
they can have here " 



SOLDIER | Mixed emotions felt during sentencing 



Continued from Page 1 

Hymer's father, David, said 
"All right!" when he heard the 
sentence "1 feel justice is here," 
he said later. "It makes me put a 
close to this." 

Supporters praised Stan- 
ley's performance as a soldier 
and his character as a young 
boy growing up But on Satur- 



day, Hamner told the panel it 
shouldn't be swayed by those 
pleas. 

"On 13 September, he was 
the antithesis of everything 
good that was said about him 
yesterday," he said. 

Stanley read an apology in 
court Friday. 

"I'm so sorry," he said to the 
victims' families. "I hope that 



you will find it in your hearts to 
forgive me, and 1 hope that this 
brings peace." 

All four soldiers were part 
of the 1st Battalion of the 41st 
Infantry Regiment, 3rd Bri- 
gade, 1st Armored Division 
based at Fort Riley. Both Stan- 
ley and Colvin were with Bra- 
vo Company and had served in 
Iraq. 



Africa terror cells increasing fighters in Iraq 



Watercolor studio exhibit on display 



By Todd Pitman 

THE ASSOCIATED PUSS 

DAKAR, Senegal - Up to 20 
percent of suicide car bombers 
in Iraq are from Algeria, a sign 
of growing cooperation between 
Islamic extremists in northern 
Africa and like-minded Iraqis, a 
senior US military official said 
Tuesday. 

The American officer said 
terror cells in the Middle East 
and northern Africa were in- 
creasingly joining forces as they 
face crackdowns in their own 



countries, leading to a stepped 
up flow of money and Islamic 
extremists to Iraq. 

The United States has reacted 
by funneling more money and 
troops into north and northwest 
Africa to train and equip armies 
to combat the growing threat 
from local terror and insurgent 
groups like Algeria's Salafist 
Group for Call and Combat, 
which is believed to have links 
with Osama bin Lad en's al Qa 
ida network and is considered 
a terrorist organization by the 
United States. 



Last week, U.S. troops 
from the European Command 
- which overseas US military 
interests in Europe and most of 
Africa - kicked off a two-week 
counter-terrorism training exer- 
cise called Flintlock involving 
forces from Algeria, Chad, Mau- 
ritania, Mali, Niger, Senegal, Ni- 
geria, Tunisia and Morocco. 

The officer said north Afri- 
can Islamic militant groups were 
providing some cash to the insur- 
gency in Iraq - about $200,000 
so far, mosdy tunneled through 
Europe to Syria and into Iraq. 



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KANSAS i (All LOUt&IAN 

The Manhattan Arts Cen- 
ter's Watercolor studio's lat- 
est exhibit "Symphony in 
Color" is on display until July 
16. 

Meeting every Wednesday 
morning, the MAC Watercol- 
or studio is a group of about 
20 artists that paint togeth- 
er and critique each others' 
work, Brady Miller, program 
and marketing director, said. 

"It's not a class, but a work- 
shop that meets each week," 
he said. "They generally have 
an exhibit here at the Man- 
hattan Arts Center either an- 
nually or semi-annually " 

The group started off as a 
class, but continued to meet 
to help each other out, Laurie 
Pieper, coordinator of the ex- 
hibit, said 

"It started with a class in 
the Manhattan Arts Center," 
she said. "When the class 
was over, the group wanted 
to keep meeting and that was 
about nine or 10 years ago 

"The membership has 
changed some since then, but 
the people in the group are 
faithful." 

Pieper said part of the re a 
son that the group is success- 
ful is because they want to 
meet each week. 

"It's a nice group and they 
meet because they want to 
meet," she said "They all 
know it can be hard to make 




UndMy Bauman | COI IIUAN 
"The Temporal and the eternal" by Gayle Dwell rungs In the Manhattan Am Center as 
part ot an rjchtbrt entitled 'Symphony in Color* rhe eihRut runs through Jury 16. 



progress, so they're all sup- 
portive of each other." 

Pieper said the exhibit is 
intriguing because there are 
several different styles of 
painting to admire. 

"We had our opening re- 
ception a while ago," Pieper 
said, "and people were get- 
ting a chance to see how 
members' work has changed. 
People have started to recog 
nize the styles of some of the 
members, which is not some 
Ihing you get with a show out 
of town. 

"That's only something 
you can get with local art 
ists and shows. The commu- 
nity has been very supportive 
and people like to hear about 
what people are doing," 

The front gallery of the 
Center has an exhibit of in- 
structors, Miller said. He 



said there are five instructors 
that have art on display, but 
it isn't part of the "Symphony 
in Color" exhibit 

"There are some instruc- 
tors that are also in the Sym- 
phony in Color' ex